Mar 29, 2020  
2017 - 2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HIST 261 - History of Ancient Rome


    Spring (3) Donahue (College 200, CSI, GER 4A)

    History of the ancient Romans from their earliest origins through the third century CE.  Principal emphasis will be on the political, social, and cultural aspects of Roman history. (This course is anchored in the CSI domain, and also considers aspects of the ALV domain.) (Cross listed with CLCV 228 )
  
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    HIST 265 - Postwar Japan


    Fall (3) Han (CSI, GER 4B)

    An examination of various aspects of post-World War II Japan. After an intensive look at politics and the economy, the course explores such topics as the popularity of new religions, changing attitudes toward sex and marriage, Japan's new nationalism, Japan's role in the larger Asian region and beyond, and the culture and life of Tokyo. Several documentaries and movies will be shown. (Open to all students, including freshmen and sophomores with AP history credit or exemptions.)
  
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    HIST 280 - West Africa Since 1800


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff (CSI, GER 4B)

    Explores the survival of West Africans in ancient environments, subsequent challenges in trans-Saharan and Atlantic slave trade, colonial overrule, political independence, and ever-increasing globalization as well as relocation to rural America in the early Atlantic era and eventually to contemporary American cities. (Cross listed with AFST 308 )
  
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    HIST 281 - Ancient African History


    Fall or Spring (3) Choin, Pope, Vinson (CSI)

    This course covers African history before AD 600, with emphasis on political and cultural histories of ancient cities and states.  It is a more focused survey than HIST 181 , but it has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of Africa. (Cross-listed with AFST 281 )
  
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    HIST 282 - Medieval African History


    Fall or Spring (3) Chouin, Pope, Vinson (CSI)

    This course covers African history between 600 and 1500, with emphasis on the influence of Islam and changing commercial networks. It is a more focused survey than HIST 181 , but it has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of Africa. (Cross-listed with AFST 282 )
  
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    HIST 283 - Early Modern African History


    Fall or Spring (3) Chouin, Pope, Vinson (CSI)

    This course covers African history between 1500 and 1800, particularly Africa's changing relationship with Western Europe and the Americas. It is a more focused survey than HIST 181 , but it has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of Africa.
      (Cross-listed with AFST 283 )
  
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    HIST 284 - African History during Colonialism and Independence


    Spring (3) Chouin, Pope, Vinson (CSI, GER 4B)

    This course cover African History from 1800 to the present, with emphasis on African state-building, slavery and abolition, the Africanization of Islam and Christianity, Colonialism and Anti-Colonial Politics, African Independence/Pan-Africanism and contemporary issues. (formerly HIST 182) (Cross listed with AFST 317 )
  
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    HIST 299 - History Courses Taken Abroad


    Fall, Spring, Summer (1-4)

    This is the designation for history courses taken abroad and approved for William and Mary history credit.
  
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    HIST 301 - The Historian's Craft


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff (CSI)

    This course is designed for history majors or for students who intend to be history majors. Ideally, they will take this class either in the semester in which they declare their history major, or in the following term. The class will familiarize students with historiographical schools and with the idea of history as a discipline while also covering the arts and techniques of historical writing. It will typically require a final paper demonstrating the use of reason, evidence, compositional skills, and scholarly apparatus. This course is strongly recommended for students who are considering writing a history honors thesis.
  
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    HIST 304 - History of Brazil


    Fall or Spring (3) Prado, Staff (CSI)

    Antecedents of modern Brazil, 1500-present, with accent on economic, social and cultural factors as well as on political growth in the Portuguese colony, the Empire and the Republic.
  
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    HIST 305 - History of Mexico


    Fall or Spring (3) Konefal, Staff (CSI)

    Development of the Mexican nation from the Spanish conquest to the present. Sequential treatment of the interaction of Spanish and Indian cultures, expansion of the frontier, independence, 19thcentury liberalism and caudillism, the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and its institutionalization.
  
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    HIST 306 - Terror, Human Rights, and Memory in Latin America


    Fall (3) Konefal (CSI)

    This course will examine state violence and its repercussions in Latin America since the mid-20th century, focusing on three case studies: Chile, Argentina, and Guatemala.  These cases (representative of a much broader phenomenon) give students the opportunity to engage critically and in-depth with some of the major questions surrounding violence and human rights: What explains the continent-wide wave of repression in Latin America in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s?  When and why did governments choose to use extreme force against their own citizens?  To what extent was the US government aware of or implicated in the violence?  How were the extremes of "dirty" wars possible?  How could the word "disappear," for example, come into everyday grammar in Latin America as a transitive verb?  In what ways could and did people resist? 
  
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    HIST 309 - The Caribbean


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff (College 200, CSI)

    Situated at the crossroads of Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the United States, the Caribbean has played a pivotal role in global transformations since 1492. The region's past helped shape and was shaped by many of the contradictory themes defining modern history: slavery and freedom, racism and equality, empire and independence, despotism and democracy, and migration and transnationalism. Focusing on Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and especially Haiti and Cuba, we will explore these themes in Caribbean history from the Haitian Revolution to the present. The course is structured around class discussion. Grading will be based on brief papers and class participation. (This course is anchored in the CSI domain, and also considers aspects of the ALV domain.) (Cross-listed with AFST 319  / LAS 309 .)
  
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    HIST 310 - African Americans and Africa


    Fall or Spring (3) Vinson (CSI)

    This course explores the political, socio-economic, educational and cultural connections between African Americans and Africa. It examines the close linkages but also the difficulties between Africans and diasporic peoples in the modern era. (Cross-listed with AFST 299 )
  
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    HIST 311 - Topics in History


    Fall (1-4) Staff

    Intermediate level topics courses open to all students but preferably those with previous experience in 100- and/or 200-level history courses. (These courses may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.)
  
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    HIST 312 - Topics in History


    Spring (1-4) Staff

    Intermediate level topics courses open to all students but preferably those with previous experience in 100- and/or 200-level history courses. (These courses may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.)
  
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    HIST 313 - Topics in Women's History


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff

    Intermediate level topics course open to all students but preferably to students who have completed HIST 221  / GSWS 221  and/or HIST 222  / GSWS 222 . (This course may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.)
  
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    HIST 315 - Asian Pacific American History


    Fall (3) Thelwell (College 200, CSI)

    This course offers a broad survey of Asian Pacific American history.  Given the immense diversity of Asian Pacific American communities, we cannot offer an exhaustive history in one semester.  Instead, we cover a number of major events in Asian Pacific American history and focus on many key concepts in Asian Pacific American Studies. Furthermore, we are interested in Asian Pacific American identity as a social construct, and spend a large amount of time focusing on race discourse.  Many of the readings address the ways in which Asian Pacific American racial identity was constructed in American popular culture and law.  Other key topics include immigration, exclusion, citizenship, class, and gender. (This course is anchored in the CSI domain, and also considers aspects of the ALV domain.) (Cross-listed with APIA 315 )
  
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    HIST 316 - Pan-Africanism: History of a Revolutionary Idea


    Fall or Spring (3) Vinson (CSI, GER 4C)

    This course surveys the history of Pan-Africanism, a global political movement that considers Africans and diasporic blacks to have a common history, present and future, often proclaiming an objective of African political, socio-economic and cultural self-determination and asserting a fierce pride in African history and culture. (formerly HIST 239) (Cross-listed with AFST 300 )
  
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    HIST 317 - History of Modern South Africa


    Fall or Spring (3) Vinson (CSI, GER 4C)

    This course provides a detailed examination of segregation and apartheid in twentieth century South Africa and charts the development and ultimate success of the anti-apartheid movement that led to the 'miracle' of a democratic South Africa. (formerly HIST 230) (Cross-listed with AFST 427 )
  
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    HIST 318 - United States Military History, 1860-1975


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff

    An examination of the growth of the U.S. military establishment and the exercise of and changes in military strategy and policies, as shaped by political, social and economic factors. Crucial to our inquiry will not only be discussions about the decisions and attitudes of ranking military and civilian leaders but also an analysis of the lives and circumstances of enlisted personnel, lower-ranking officers and civilian support staff.
      (formerly HIST 428)
  
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    HIST 319 - The Nuclear World


    Fall or Spring (3) Kitamura (College 200, CSI)

    This course explores the emergence of nuclear technology and its widespread impact on global politics, business, and culture from World War II to the present day. (This course is anchored in the CSI domain, and also considers aspects of the ALV domain.)
  
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    HIST 320 - Nubia: An African Kingdom in American Thought, 1767-present


    Fall or Spring (3) Pope (GER 4A)

    For over two centuries of American history, perceptions of Africa and of race have been expressed through shifting interpretations of an ancient African kingdom called Nubia. This course will trace the archaeological rediscovery of Nubia and explore its changing significance in American thought. No prior knowledge of Nubia is required.
  
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    HIST 321 - Topics in Civil Rights


    Fall or Spring (3) Vinson, Staff

    The description and organization of this course will vary in accordance with different interests and expertise of each individual instructor.
  
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    HIST 322 - The African Diaspora before 1492


    Fall or Spring (3) Pope

    This course examines the experiences of sub-Saharan Africans who traveled, before the Atlantic Slave Trade, throughout the Middle East, Indian Ocean, China, and Europe as merchants, soldiers, slaves, scholars, pilgrims, and ambassadors. (formerly HIST 232)
  
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    HIST 323 - The African Diaspora, 1492-1808


    Fall or Spring (3) Vinson (GER 4C)

    This course examines the migrations of Africans to the Americas during the Atlantic Slave Trade era, the development of new identities in their new societies and their continued connections to Africa. (formerly HIST 183) (Cross listed with  AFST 304 )
  
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    HIST 324 - The African Diaspora since 1808


    Fall or Spring (3) Vinson

    This course examines the African Diaspora since 1800 with major themes including the end of slavery, the fight for full citizenship and the close interactions between diasporic blacks and Africans. Students who have already taken  HIST 323 - The African Diaspora, 1492-1808  are particularly encouraged to take this more advanced class. (Cross listed with AFST 305 )
  
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    HIST 325 - The Rise and Fall of Apartheid


    Fall or Spring (3) Vinson (GER 4C)

    This class explores the rise and fall of apartheid, the system of rigid racial segregation and domination that existed in South Africa from 1948 to 1994. It examines the successful anti-apartheid movement but also considers apartheids legacy in contemporary South Africa. (Cross-listed with AFST 426 )
  
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    HIST 326 - African Religions in the Diaspora


    Spring (3) (GER 4C)

    Survey of the cultural retention and change of African religions in the Diaspora. Considers the encounter between African, indigenous, and European religions in the context of slavery and freedom. (formerly HIST 451)
  
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    HIST 327 - The Global Color Line: U.S. Civil Rights and South African Anti-Apartheid Politics


    Fall or Spring (3) Vinson

    This course examines the Civil Rights movement as part of a centuries-long tradition of black freedom struggles. The course also compares the Civil Rights movement with the South African anti-apartheid struggle and shows the close transnational relationship between African Americans and black South Africans. (formerly HIST 231) (Cross listed with AFST 312 )
  
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    HIST 330 - America and China: U.S.-China Relations since 1784


    Spring (3) Staff

    A study of U.S.-China relations from 1784 to the present, with special attention to Sino-American relations in the 20th and 21st centuries. This course satisfies the department's computing requirement.
  
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    HIST 331 - Modern Japanese History


    Fall or Spring (3) Han (GER 4B)

    A history of Japan from the Tokugawa period (1600-1868) to the present, with emphasis on the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. (formerly HIST 328)
  
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    HIST 332 - Modern Korean History


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff

    An examination of the major developments and issues in modern Korean history, including the collapse of the traditional order, Japanese colonial rule, the emergence of distinct political regimes in the north and south and north-south confrontation.
  
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    HIST 333 - Modern Chinese History


    Fall (3) Hubbard

    A history of China from 1644 to the present focusing on China's imperial system, the experiment with republican government, and China under communist rule since 1949. This course satisfies the departments computing requirement. (formerly HIST 329)
  
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    HIST 334 - Nation, Gender, and Race in South Asia


    Fall or Spring (3) Zutshi (GER 4B)

    This course examines the often inter-linked roles and definitions of nation, gender, and race, how these factors both undermined and reinforced British rule, and how they reshaped social relations in South Asia. Assignments include films, novels, memoirs, and travelogues. (formerly HIST 270)
  
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    HIST 341 - United States Immigration History


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): HIST 121  HIST 122  

    An introduction to the history of immigration to the United States from 1789 to the present. Emphasizing immigration from Ireland, China, Mexico and Eastern Europe, the course focuses on the history of U.S. immigration policy. It involves short lectures and discussions. (formerly HIST 431)
  
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    HIST 342 - The Invasion of North America


    Spring (3) Staff

    An introduction to the exploration, exploitation and colonization of eastern North America by the Spanish, French, English and Dutch; their cultural interaction with Native Americans in war and peace. (formerly HIST 426)
  
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    HIST 344 - Colonial North America, 1492-1763


    Fall (3) Mapp

    A survey of the history of North America north of Mexico from the beginnings of sustained European contact through the end of the Seven Years' War. (formerly HIST 411)
  
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    HIST 345 - The American Revolution, 1763-1789


    Spring (3) Mapp

    An in-depth study of the origins of the American independence movement, the struggle between the rebellious colonies and the British Empire, the formation of the United States, and the salient cultural and social developments of the Revolutionary era. (formerly HIST 412)
  
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    HIST 346 - Antebellum America


    Fall or Spring (3) Sheriff

    Covering the period from 1815-1850, this course examines social, political, economic and cultural transformations in the pre-Civil War United States. (formerly HIST 415)
  
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    HIST 347 - The Civil War Era


    Fall or Spring (3) Sheriff

    Examines the social, political, economic, and cultural history of the United States from 1850-1877. Military campaigns receive only minimal coverage. (formerly HIST 416)
  
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    HIST 348 - Old South


    Spring (3) Staff

    The American South from its colonial origins to the defeat of the Confederacy, including as major topics social structure, economic and geographic expansion, slavery as a system of profit and social control, the growth of southern sectionalism, and the southern mind. (formerly HIST 417)
  
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    HIST 349 - Exploring the Afro-American Past


    Fall or Spring (3)

    A study of the commonalities and differences across Afro- America from the U.S. to Brazil. Works in Anthropology, History and Literature will be used to explore the nature of historical consciousness within the African Diaspora and diverse ways of understanding the writing about Afro-American pasts. (formerly HIST 345) (Cross listed with AMST 402 and ANTH 429 )
  
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    HIST 350 - Free and Enslaved Blacks in the Old South


    Fall (3) Ely GER 4C

    Free and enslaved Afro-Southerners' relations with one another and with whites from colonization to the Civil War. Themes include the variety of human experience under the slave regime; cultural affinities and differences among blacks, and between black and white Southerners. (formerly HIST 452)
  
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    HIST 351 - U.S. Gilded Age


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff

    1866-1901. Explores the collapse of Reconstruction and the rise of big business. Topics include Victorian sexuality, the Jim Crow South, craft unionism, cities in the West and literary naturalism. Preference to juniors and seniors. (formerly HIST 418)
  
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    HIST 352 - U.S. Foreign Relations, 1763-1900


    Fall (3) Kitamura

    An examination of U.S. interactions with the wider world from 1763 to 1900. Topics include top-level policymaking, business exchange, cultural interaction, population movement, military confrontation, social control, racial affairs, and gender relations. (formerly HIST 433)
  
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    HIST 353 - U.S. Foreign Relations, 1901 to the Present


    Spring (3) Kitamura

    An examination of U.S. interactions with the wider world from 1901 to the present day. Topics include top-level policymaking, business exchange, cultural interaction, population movement, military confrontation, social control, racial affairs, and gender relations. (formerly HIST 434)
  
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    HIST 354 - America and Vietnam


    Spring (3) Staff

    An examination of the United States' role in Vietnam from 1945 to the present. The political, cultural, ideological and economic ramifications of the United States involvement will be analyzed from the American as well as the Vietnamese perspective. (formerly HIST 435)
  
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    HIST 355 - Religion in 19th Century America


    Spring (3) Grasso

    This course explores how nineteenth-century Americans construed and debated personal religious experience, and how religious institutions developed and competed for social, cultural, and political power in this period.  Topics include: Reason and Revolution; Evangelicalism; Democratization; Class Formation; Millennialism and the Apocalypse; Antislavery, Proslavery, and Reform; Civil War Christianities; Gender; Religious Psychology; Liberalism, Fundamentalism, and Agnosticism; and the Varieties of Religious Experience.
  
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    HIST 357 - Medieval Europe


    Fall and Spring (3) Daileader

    Surveys the history of medieval Europe from the later Roman Empire through the Renaissance.
  
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    HIST 358 - The European Renaissance


    Fall or Spring (3) Homza

    Investigation into the intellectual emphases and social and political contexts of humanist practices in Europe between 1314- 1598. Attention to historiography and historical method.
  
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    HIST 359 - The Reformation in Western Europe


    Fall or Spring (3) Homza Prerequisite(s): HIST 111  or consent of instructor. (College 200, CSI)

    An investigation into the Catholic and Protestant Reformations in early modern Europe, 1500-1700. Examination of the foundations and effects of religious upheaval and codification. Attention to literacy, printing, the family, the creation of confessional identity and historiography. (This course is anchored in the CSI domain, and also considers aspects of the ALV domain.)
  
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    HIST 360 - Roman Britain


    Fall or Spring (3) Hutton

    The history and archaeology of Roman Britain. The story of the founding of the Roman province in Britain and its subsequent development. Examination of various aspects of Roman-British culture, including town life, fortifications, religion, art, villas, leisure and amusements. (Cross-listed with CLCV 340 .)
  
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    HIST 361 - Roman Greece


    Fall or Spring (3) Hutton

    An archaeological, literary and cultural study of ancient Greece during the period in which Greece was part of the Roman Empire. How did Greece change under Roman rule, and how did Greek culture affect the rest of the empire? (Cross-listed with CLCV 341 .)
  
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    HIST 362 - History and Statecraft: Great Power Diplomacy, 1648-1949


    Fall and Spring (3) Butler

    This course uses case studies of episodes in Great Power politics from the Treaty of Westphalia to the founding of NATO to consider the application of history to current issues in international relations. Course readings prepare students to discuss and debate a range of key topics, such as the challenge of diplomatic/military overextension, foreign intervention in civil conflicts, relations among democracies and dictatorships, and the creation of successful (and unsuccessful) international structures. Evaluation is based on in-class participation, brief essays, and exams.
  
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    HIST 363 - The Age of Absolutism and Revolution in Europe, 1648-1789


    Fall (3) Schechter

    An intensive survey of Europe in transition: absolutism, enlightenment, enlightened despotism. This course satisfies the Department's computing requirement.
  
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    HIST 364 - The Age of Absolutism and Revolution in Europe, 1789-1870


    Spring (3) Schechter

    An intensive survey of Europe in transition: revolution, industrialization and the emergence of the modern state. This course satisfies the Department's computing requirement.
  
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    HIST 368 - Race, Class, and Gender in the British Empire


    Fall or Spring (3) Levitan

    This course will survey the social and cultural history of the British Empire from the sixteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on the ways in which diverse groups of people experienced empire. Themes will include migration, slavery, race, gender, imperial culture, class, and resistance to empire.
  
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    HIST 369 - History of Britain 1453-1783


    Fall (3) Levitan, Staff

    A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Britain.
  
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    HIST 370 - History of Britain 1783 to the Present


    Spring (3) Levitan, Staff

    A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Britain.
  
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    HIST 373 - East Central Europe


    Fall or Spring (3) Koloski, Staff

    Modern history of the east-central region of Europe between Germany and Russia. Topics include: 19th century multi-national empires, 20th century (re)emergence of nation-states, citizens' struggles to define political, social, and cultural identities despite foreign domination, and post-1989 developments.
  
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    HIST 377 - History of Russia to 1800


    Fall (3) Corney

    The political, cultural and intellectual development of Russia. From Kievan Rus' to the end of the 18th century, tracing the Mongol occupation, the rise of Muscovy and the Romanov dynasty.
  
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    HIST 378 - History of Russia since 1800


    Spring (3) Corney

    The political, cultural and intellectual development of 19th and 20th century Russia, tracing the twilight of the Romanovs, the rise of socialist thought, and the Communist state.
  
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    HIST 382 - History of Spain


    Fall or Spring (3) Homza

    A survey of Spanish history from 1478 to 1978 that also asks students to investigate cultural, political and social issues in depth, such as the goals of inquisitors, the question of Spanish decline and the context of the Civil War.
  
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    HIST 383 - History of Germany to 1918


    Fall (3) Benes, Staff

    Origins and establishment of the modern German state to the First World War.
  
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    HIST 384 - History of Germany since 1918


    Spring (3) Benes, Staff

    Establishment and course of Hitler's Third Reich, development of two Germanies since 1945, and their subsequent reunification.
  
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    HIST 385 - History of France, 1648 to 1800


    Fall (3) Schechter, Staff

    Intensive examination of a pre-industrial society with special emphasis on social, economic and intellectual problems during the ancient regime and Revolution.
  
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    HIST 386 - History of France, 1800 to the Present


    Spring (3) Schechter, Staff

    1800 to the present with special attention to social and economic problems as well as to the politics of 20th and 21st century France.
  
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    HIST 387 - England Under the Tudors, 1485-1603


    Fall (3) Popper, Staff

    A survey of developments in English political, social, intellectual, cultural, and religious history from the ascension of Henry VII in 1485 to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603.
  
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    HIST 388 - Britain Under the Stuarts, 1603-1714


    Spring (3) Popper, Staff

    A survey of the political, religious, cultural, social, and intellectual history of the British Isles from the coronation of James VI and I in 1603 to the death of Queen Anne in 1714.
  
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    HIST 391 - Intellectual History of Modern Europe: Renaissance to the Enlightenment


    Fall (3) Benes, Staff

    Cultural and intellectual development of the Western world from the end of the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment.
  
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    HIST 392 - Intellectual History of Modern Europe: 19th to the 21st Centuries


    Spring (3) Benes, Staff

    Cultural and intellectual development of the Western world from the Enlightenment to the present.
  
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    HIST 393 - American Cultural and Intellectual History from the Beginnings through the Early National Period


    Fall (3) C. Brown

    An interdisciplinary approach to the development of colonial and early national American culture and society, with special emphasis on the transit of European culture, regionalism and the emergence of the ideology of American exceptionalism. (formerly HIST 437)
  
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    HIST 394 - American Cultural and Intellectual History from the Early National Period through the Early 20th Century


    Spring (3) C. Brown

    An interdisciplinary approach to the development of colonial and early national American culture and society. Explores the social construction of knowledge, race, gender and class in the 19th- and early 20th-century United States, through an intensive reading of primary sources. (formerly HIST 438)
  
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    HIST 400 - Colonial and Revolutionary Virginia


    Fall or Spring (3) Whittenburg, Richter

    A specialized study of the founding and development of Virginia from the founding of Jamestown through the early years of the new nation with special emphasis on the evolution of its social and political structure, economy, gender, race, and material culture. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .
  
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    HIST 401 - Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia


    Fall or Spring (3) Richter

    An examination and assessment of the influence of gender, race, and power on the way in which all people--male and female; free and enslaved; Indian, European, and African--shaped the development of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Virginia society. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .
  
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    HIST 402 - Thomas Jefferson in America and the World


    Fall or Spring (3) Kern

    This course explores the life of Thomas Jefferson, his great contributions to ideas of liberty and government that reverberate in the world, and his many legacies that are part of U.S. history and culture, including being one of America's most famous slaveholders and author of Indian extermination policies. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .
  
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    HIST 403 - Archaeology of Colonial Williamsburg and Tidewater Virginia


    Spring (3) Brown

    Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or consent of instructor. This course examines the archaeological research on sites located in and around Williamsburg, the capital of the colony of Virginia from 1699-1781, as a way of reviewing the theory and method of historical archaeology. This course is sponsored by NIAHD . (Cross listed with  ANTH 457  and ANTH 557)
  
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    HIST 404 - Foodways and the Archaeological Record


    Spring (3) Bowen

    In a seminar format, students will draw upon archaeological, historical, and anthropological studies to explore topics such as human-animal relationships surrounding the procurement and production of food, as well as the distribution, preparation, and consumption of food. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .   (Cross listed with ANTH 426   and ANTH 526)
  
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    HIST 405 - History of Museums and Historic Preservation-US 1850-Present


    Fall or Spring (3) Kern

    This course will identify and challenge how landmark institutions define and redefine culture, history, and their own significance. We will consider private, volunteer, and government roles in preserving and creating historic sites, and how museums and public history have changed since the mid-nineteenth century. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .
  
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    HIST 406 - Architectural History Field School


    Summer (3) Lounsbury

    The course introduces students to the methods used in the investigation, description, and recording of historic buildings. The program is intended to help students distinguish the form, fabrication, and assembly of materials and building elements and understand their chronology. They will learn how to read and apply field evidence to answer larger questions concerning architectural and social history. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .
  
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    HIST 407 - Field School in Material Culture


    Spring (3) Kern

    This course provides tools for using material culture as a source for history through multidisciplinary study in the identification, documentation, analysis, and interpretation of material objects. The material culture of tobacco provides our subject, from ancient forms of consumption, agricultural practices, labor systems, to the rise of the modern corporation. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .
  
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    HIST 408 - NIAHD Field School in Public History


    Fall and Spring (3) Richter

    This course fulfills the NIAHD internship requirement and is designed to give students practical experience in a museum setting with a background of readings in public history and classroom discussion sessions designed to promote both critical and scholarly engagement with an individually chosen topic. The instructor will work with students before the start of the semester to arrange for a museum professional to host the student in a professional working environment for about ten hours a week in addition to the class meetings. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .
  
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    HIST 409 - Public History


    Fall (3) Richter

    Public History explores how history museums, especially Colonial Williamsburg, present history and make it meaningful today. The course uses current issues of society, politics, and race to interpret institutions that purport to speak to the collective identity of Americans through such media as exhibitions, performances, books, film, and digital communications. This course is sponsored by NIAHD . (formerly HIST 448)
  
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    HIST 410 - Early American Architecture


    Fall or Spring (3) Lounsbury, Kern

    This course is intended to introduce students to issues and research methods in early American architecture. Buildings are examined as expressions of fine art and social history. The course focuses on a variety of topics, building types, and theoretical approaches by examining archaeological and documentary sources and standing structures. This course is sponsored by NIAHD .
  
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    HIST 413 - Topics in History


    Fall (3) Staff

    Topics vary by semester. For current offerings, please consult the course schedule posted on my.wm.edu. (These courses may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.) (formerly HIST 490)
  
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    HIST 414 - Topics in History


    Spring (3) Staff

    Topics vary by semester. For current offerings, please consult the course schedule posted on my.wm.edu. (These courses may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.) (formerly HIST 491)
  
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    HIST 467 - Independent Study


    Fall (3) Staff

    A tutorial designed primarily for history majors who wish to pursue independent study of a problem or topic. Programs of study will be arranged individually with a faculty supervisor. Admission by consent of the chair of the department. Students must have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to pursue independent study in history. (These courses may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.)
  
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    HIST 468 - Independent Study


    Spring (3) Staff

    A tutorial designed primarily for history majors who wish to pursue independent study of a problem or topic. Programs of study will be arranged individually with a faculty supervisor. Admission by consent of the chair of the department. Students must have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to pursue independent study in history. (These courses may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.)
  
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    HIST 490C - Capstone Seminar


    Fall (4) Staff

    Topics vary by semester. Note: For current offerings, please consult the course schedule posted on my.wm.edu. (These courses may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.)
  
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    HIST 491C - Capstone Seminar


    Spring (4) Staff

    Topics vary by semester. Note: For current offerings, please consult the course schedule posted on my.wm.edu. (These courses may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.)
  
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    HIST 495 - Honors


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff

    Students admitted to honors study in history will be enrolled in this course during both semesters of their senior year. Each candidate will be responsible for (a) reading and discussion of a selected list of books in some specific area of historical literature; (b) submission of a scholarly thesis to his or her advisor two weeks before the last day of classes of his or her graduating semester; (c) a comprehensive oral examination. Admission by consent of the department chair. The department's honors program guidelines are available on the department's website and in hard copy (consult the department secretary). Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see Honors and Special Programs under Requirements for Degrees in this catalog.
  
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    HIST 496 - Honors


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff

    Students admitted to honors study in history will be enrolled in this course during both semesters of their senior year. Each candidate will be responsible for (a) reading and discussion of a selected list of books in some specific area of historical literature; (b) submission of a scholarly thesis to his or her advisor two weeks before the last day of classes of his or her graduating semester; (c) a comprehensive oral examination. Admission by consent of the department chair. The department's honors program guidelines are available on the department's website and in hard copy (consult the department secretary). Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see Honors and Special Programs under Requirements for Degrees in this catalog.
  
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    HIST 499 - Internship in History


    Fall, Spring, Summer (1-3) Staff

    This designation is used for internships that would count towards the major in history. Each internship application can be approved only by the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies who will decide whether the internship meets the academic standards and work requirements of the
    history department.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
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    INTR 100 - Big Ideas in Interdisciplinary Studies


    Fall or Spring (4) Staff. (College 100)

    An exploration of significant questions and integrative concepts in Interdisciplinary Studies, their grounding in the process of scientific discovery and application, and their broader relevance to society. Designed for first-year students. Although topics vary, the courses also seek to improve students' communication skills beyond the written word.
  
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    INTR 150 - First-Year Seminar


    Fall and Spring (4) Staff (College 150)

    An exploration of interdisciplinary topics in a seminar format. A grade of C- or better fulfills the COLL 150 requirement. Although topics vary, the courses emphasize academic writing skills, reading and analysis of texts, and discussion.
  
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    INTR 160 - Digital Information Literacy


    Spring (1) Swem Reference Staff

    Examines how computers process digital information; communicating using computers; security and privacy issues; analyzing research needs; finding information electronically; evaluating the information found; and information ethics.
  
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    INTR 204 - GIS In the Earth and Environmental Sciences


    Fall and Spring (3) Rose Prerequisite(s): ENSP 101  or GEOL 101 , GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W  

    This course will provide an introduction to using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as a tool in earth and environmental science and policy. Emphasis will be on hands-on application of GIS to create maps, to organize and visualize spatial data, and to query spatial data to elucidate answers to earth and environmental questions
  
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    INTR 220 - Curating, Collecting, and Connoisseurship


    Fall and Spring (3) Spike

    This seminar, held in the Muscarelle Museum of Art, emphasizes the role of the curator in the museum field, especially in the areas of exhibition, preparation,
    cataloguing, and public speaking. Through exploration of the Muscarelle permanent collection, seminar students will also gain practical curatorial training in primary source research that will provide a foundation in the knowledge and skills expected of museum professionals. Lectures by the Museum's permanent staff will broaden the students' knowledge of the inner-workings of a museum and the variety of skillsets required in a productive and attractive museum. Students may take this course two times for credit, making it possible for them to work with additional materials for exhibition and to learn more about connoisseurship curation.  (May be repeated once for credit.)
  
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    INTR 299 - W&M Summer Study Abroad Program Preparatory Course


    Spring (1) Directors of Each Program.

    This course is designed specifically for students going on one of the W&M Summer Study Abroad Programs and is intended to enhance a student's cross-cultural understanding and experience, and to cover a variety of pre-departure questions. This course will include substantive academic content.
 

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