Aug 07, 2020  
2017 - 2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Marine Science

  
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    MSCI 398 - Marine Science Seminar


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff

    Seminar in interdisciplinary topics in Marine Science. The course topic, prerequisites, and instructors will vary from year to year.
      This course may be repeated for credit for different topics. Depending on the topic, a specific section may be crosslisted with GEOL 407 (Special Topics in Geology)  and/or ENSP 249 (Environmental Challenges: Topics) .
  
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    MSCI 401A - Fundamentals of Marine Science, Physical Oceanography


    Spring (2) Gong Prerequisite(s): MSCI 330  or BIOL 230  or GEOL 330 , and MATH 111  or permission of instructor

    This course provides an introduction to the various types and scales of motion in the ocean, the global heat budget, major water masses, and processes controlling distributions of temperature and salinity. Discussions on phenomena associated with water motion will include global circulation, wind-driven circulation in ocean basins, tides, coastal upwelling, storm surge, waves, turbulence, and circulation in estuaries. Underlying dynamics governing water motion will be presented, elucidating the role of the rotation of the earth. The El Nino/La Nina oscillation will be examined as a key example of large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions. MSCI 401A requires co-registration with the relevant MSCI 401R.
  
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    MSCI 401B - Fundamentals of Marine Science, Chemical Oceanography


    Fall (2) Smith, J., Shadwick Prerequisite(s): MSCI 330  or BIOL 230  or GEOL 330 , and CHEM 103  or permission of instructor

    This course presents an overview of the chemistry of estuaries and the ocean including chemical processes that occur in marine sediments and at the air/sea interface. Discussion topics will include the chemical properties of seawater, chemical equilibrium and kinetics, the seawater carbonate system and ocean acidification, the global and oceanic carbon and nitrogen cycles, ion speciation, trace metals, and nutrients, sediment diagenesis, and fundamentals of radioisotope and stable isotope biogeochemistry. Interdisciplinary applications are emphasized. MSCI 401B requires co-registration with the relevant MSCI 401R.
  
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    MSCI 401C - Fundamentals of Marine Geology


    Fall (2) Hein Prerequisite(s): MSCI 330  or BIOL 230  or GEOL 330  

    This course provides an introduction to the major topics of marine geology without expecting the student to have a background in geology. The course addresses the age and internal structure of the earth, the processes of plate tectonics including the formation of oceanic crust, seamounts, hydrothermal vents, the characteristics and classification of sediments and the distribution of sediments in the deep sea. Also addressed is the interrelationships among and importance of paleoceanography, climate change, and sea-level change, and the processes and characteristics of various marine, estuarine, and coastal sedimentary environments. The course includes discussion of various types of field equipment and logistics and of some economic and societal implications. MSCI 401C requires co-registration with the relevant MSCI 401R.
  
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    MSCI 401D - Fundamentals of Marine Science, Biological Oceanography


    Fall (2) Smith, W. Prerequisite(s):  MSCI 330  or BIOL 230  or GEOL 330 , and BIOL 220  or permission of instructor

    This course examines the biology and ecology of marine organisms and how they interact with their environment. Topics include the organisms and their behavior, distribution, and underlying physiology; effects of biology on elemental and nutrient cycles and visa versa; and ecosystem structure and ecological interactions. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken, as biology both depends on and influences ocean chemistry, physics, geology, and climate. The course will emphasize open ocean, pelagic systems, but will include many examples from coastal and estuarine systems, as well as shallow and deep-sea benthic systems. MSCI 401D requires co-registration with the relevant MSCI 401R.
  
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    MSCI 401E - Fundamentals of Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology, and Pathobiology


    Fall (2) Unger, Vogelbein Prerequisite(s): MSCI 330  or BIOL 230  or GEOL 330 , and BIOL 220  and BIOL 225 , and CHEM 103  

    This course emphasizes ongoing and emerging environmental concerns in the Chesapeake Bay and world ocean. Lectures will address basic concepts and mechanism of contaminant chemistry and toxicology, infectious and noninfectious diseases in aquatic organisms. Case histories will be used to illustrate sources, fate and effects of anthropogenic chemical contaminants, and the important role of environmental change on disease in marine and estuarine ecosystems. MSCI 401E requires co-registration with the relevant MSCI 401R.
  
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    MSCI 401F - Fundamentals of Marine Fisheries Science


    Spring, even years (3) Graves Prerequisite(s): MSCI 330  or BIOL 230  or GEOL 330 , and BIOL 220 

    This lecture course will introduce the principles and techniques of fishery science. Lecture topics will include the theory and impacts of fishing, description and status of international, North American and regional fisheries, fisheries oceanography, recruitment processes, single-species and ecosystem-based approaches fisheries management, and the goals and problems of sustaining an open-access common pool resource.
  
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    MSCI 401R - Fundamentals of Marine Science Recitation


    Fall or Spring (1) Staff Corequisite(s): MSCI 401A  or MSCI 401B  or MSCI 401C  or MSCI 401D  or MSCI 401E  

    MSCI 401R can be repeated once, and the title will change depending on whether the recitation section is biological or physical. The Biological topic reinforces and augments lecture material presented in MSCI 401D and E through discussion, problem sets, and review in advance of tests and quizzes. It is required for all students enrolled in MSCI 401 D or E. The Physical Science topic reinforces and augments lecture material presented in MSCI 401A, B and C through discussion, problem sets, and review in advance of tests and quizzes. It is required for all students enrolled in MSCI 401 A, B or C. MSCI 401R may be taken twice to fulfill the Fundamentals of Marine Sciences requirement, once with each topic.
  
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    MSCI 404 - Microbial Processes in a Changing Coastal Environment


    Fall (2) Anderson, Reece Prerequisite(s): BIOL 230  or (BIOL 220  and BIOL 225 ) or (BIOL 220  and MSCI 330 )

    The course will address current topics and societal concerns in coastal and estuarine systems including microbial responses to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, nutrient enrichment, and roles of bivalve-dominated systems, marshes, seagrasses, groundwater, and photic sediments on microbial nutrient cycling.
  
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    MSCI 460 - Oceans and Climate.


    Fall (2) Smith, W. Prerequisite(s): MSCI 330  or BIOL 230  (formerly 330), or GEOL 330 .

    This course will examine how physical, geological, chemical and biological processes in the oceans together affect the planet's climate in different time and spatial scales. Abrupt climate change caused by recent human activities will also be discussed.
  
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    MSCI 464 - Marine Conservation Biology


    Spring, odd years (2) Lipcius Prerequisite(s): MSCI 330  or GEOL 330  or BIOL 230  or BIOL 318  

    Application of multidisciplinary scientific principles to the protection, enhancement and restoration of marine biodiversity (genetic-ecosystem) threatened by habitat degradation, overexploitation, invasive species, and global change. Practical application through case studies and seminars by outside experts in marine conservation.
  
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    MSCI 490 - Research in Marine Science


    Fall, Spring, or Summer (1-3) Staff

    This course is designed to permit students (particularly marine science minors) to engage in independent research. Students will work closely with a faculty member as an advisor. Each student will be expected to conduct research and prepare aresearch paper appropriate for the number of credits. This course may be repeated for credit.
  
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    MSCI 497 - Problems in Marine Science


    Fall, Spring, or Summer (1-4) Staff

    This is the avenue through which supervised projects are selected to suit the need of the upper level undergraduate student. Projects are chosen in consultation with the student's supervising professor and the instructor. Credit hours depend upon the difficulty of the project and must be arranged with the instructor in advance of registration.
  
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    MSCI 498 - Special Topics in Marine Science


    Fall, Spring, or Summer (1-3) Staff

    This is the avenue through which subjects not covered in other formal courses are offered. These courses are offered on an occasional basis as demand warrants. Seminars can be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Seminars can be repeated for credit if the topic is different.

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 100 - Critical Themes in Mathematics, Historical and Modern


    Fall and Spring (4) Staff (College 100)

    The courses will explore ideas central to the evolution of mathematics and its application. Students will actively participate in the development of ideas explored in the courses. Some courses will require good high-school mathematics background. Sample topics might include Limits and Infinity, Linearity, Coding and Cryptanalysis, Geometry and Physics of Archimedes.
  
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    MATH 103 - Pre-calculus Mathematics


    Fall (3)

    A study of the real number system, sets, functions, graphs, equations, inequalities and systems of equations, followed by a study of the trigonometric functions and their properties. This course is designed only for students intending to take Math 108 or Math 111, and whose background is deficient in algebra and trigonometry. Juniors and seniors must obtain permission from the instructor to enroll. This course may not be applied toward either the minor or major in mathematics or the satisfaction of GER requirements. A student may not receive credit for this course after successfully completing a Mathematics course numbered higher than 107, with the exception of Math 150.
  
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    MATH 104 - The Mathematics of Powered Flight


    Fall and Spring (3) (College 200, NQR, MATH, GER 1)

    Applications of elementary mathematics to airplane flight. Wind and its effect on airport design and aircraft operation. Maps and map projections. Magnetic variation and compass navigation. Static air pressure: buoyancy and the altimeter. Use of a flight simulator will illustrate the mathematical analysis of certain aircraft instruments. Not open to students who have credit for a Mathematics course numbered above 210. (This course is anchored in the NQR domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    MATH 106 - Elementary Probability and Statistics


    Fall and Spring (3) (MATH, GER 1)

    Introduction to basic concepts and procedures of probability and statistics including descriptive statistics, probability, classical distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, in the context of practical applications to data analysis from other disciplines. Not open to students who have successfully completed a mathematics course numbered above 210.
  
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    MATH 108 - Brief Calculus with Applications


    Fall and Spring (4) (MATH, GER 1)

    An introduction to the calculus of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, including some multi-variable calculus, with applications in business, social and life sciences. Algebra proficiency required. Maple or Matlab may be used in the course. Students may not receive credit for more than one of Math 108, 111, and 131, and may not receive credit for Math 108 after receiving credit for any Mathematics course numbered higher than 108, with the exception of Math 150. To use Math 108 as a prerequisite for Math 112 or 132, students need approval of the department chair.
  
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    MATH 110 - Topics in Mathematics


    Fall and Spring (3)

    An introduction to mathematical thought with topics not routinely covered in existing courses. Material may be chosen from calculus, probability, statistics and various other areas of pure and applied mathematics.
  
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    MATH 111 - Calculus I


    Fall and Spring (4) (MATH, GER 1, NQR)

    Standard functions (linear, polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic) and their graphs. Tangents, derivatives, the definite integral and the fundamental theorem. Formulas for differentiation. Applications to physics, chemistry, geometry and economics. Requires graphing calculator. Concurrent enrollment in Math 111 calculus lab required. Students may not receive credit for more than one of Math 108, 111, and 131.
  
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    MATH 112 - Calculus II


    Fall and Spring (4) Prerequisite(s): MATH 111  or MATH 131 . (MATH, GER 1)

    Methods of integration. Applications of the integral to geometry, chemistry, physics and economics. Slope fields and the qualitative behavior of solutions to differential equations. Approximations: sequences, series, and Taylor series. Concurrent enrollment in Math 112 Maple or Matlab calculus lab required. Students may not receive credits for more than one of Math 112 and 132.
  
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    MATH 131 - Calculus I for Life Sciences


    Fall (4) (MATH, GER 1)

    Mathematical topics parallel to those in Math 111. Applications in Math 131 focus on issues of importance in the Life Sciences, e.g., mathematical models of population dynamics, ecology, physiology, genetics, neurology.  Students may not receive credit for more than one of Math 108, 111, and 131.
  
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    MATH 132 - Calculus II for Life Sciences


    Spring (4) Prerequisite(s): MATH 111  or MATH 131 . (MATH, GER 1)

    Mathematical topics parallel those in Math112. Applications in this course focus on issues of importance in the Life Sciences, mathematical models of population dynamics, ecology, physiology, and epidemiology.  Students may not receive credit for both Math 112 and Math 132.
  
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    MATH 210 - Linearity


    Fall (4) Johnson. Prerequisite(s): MATH 112 

    Linear equations, dimension, linear transformations and their eigenvalues. Quadratic forms and matrix factorization. An introduction to research problems will include work in MATLAB and the typesetting language LATEX. Note: Students may not take both Math 210 and Math 211 for credit.
  
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    MATH 211 - Linear Algebra


    Fall and Spring (3,3) Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: MATH 112  or MATH 132 .

    Linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, orthogonality. Optional topics include least squares problems, matrix factorization, applications. A computer lab using the software package Matlab may accompany the class. Note: Students may not take both Math 210 and Math 211 for credit.
  
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    MATH 212 - Introduction to Multivariable Calculus


    Fall and Spring (3,3) Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: MATH 112  or MATH 132 .

    Functions of several variables, surfaces in three-space, vectors, techniques of partial differentiation and multiple integration with applications. MAPLE or Matlab will be used in this course. Students may not receive credit for both Math 212 and 213.
  
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    MATH 213 - Multivariable Calculus for Science and Mathematics


    Fall and Spring (4,4) Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: MATH 112  or MATH 132 .

    Covers all Math 212 material plus other vector calculus topics (including Gauss' and Stokes' theorems). Students may not receive credit  for both Math 212 and MATH 213. Math 213 may replace Math 212 as a prerequisite and is particularly recommended for science and mathematics students.
  
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    MATH 214 - Foundations of Mathematics


    Fall and Spring (3,3) Prerequisite(s):  MATH 112  or MATH 132 .

    Fundamentals of advanced mathematics: Propositional logic, quantifiers and methods of proof; naive set theory including mathematical induction, relations, orders, functions, and countability.
  
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    MATH 300 - Mathematical Sciences Writing


    Fall and Spring (1) Staff Prerequisite(s): MATH 214 

    Students will develop their mathematical writing skills in a term written project. Sources for topice include the history of mathematics, research conducted by the student, or topics from an upper division course that the student has taken or is currently taking. Fulfills the major writing requirement.
  
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    MATH 302 - Ordinary Differential Equations


    Fall and Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and (MATH 212  or MATH 213 ).

    First-order separable, linear, and nonlinear differential equations. First-order systems and forced second-order linear equations. Systems of linear equations and linearization. Numerical methods, bifurcations, and qualitative analysis. Applications to biology, chemistry, economics, physics, and social sciences.
  
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    MATH 307 - Abstract Algebra


    Fall and Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and MATH 214 .

    Groups, rings, fields, isomorphisms; polynomials. Additional topics chosen from group theory and ring theory, as time permits.
  
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    MATH 309 - Intermediate Linear Algebra


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and MATH 214 .

    Complex numbers; inner product spaces; adjoints of linear transformations; projections; unitary transformations. Spectral theorem for normal, Hermitian and unitary transformations. Polar and singular-value decompositions. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors; the Jordan canonical form. Bilinear and quadratic forms; Sylvester's Law of Inertia. Dual spaces: linear functionals, biorthogonal systems, annihilators. Tensors and tensor products.
  
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    MATH 311 - Elementary Analysis


    Fall and Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 212  or MATH 213 ) and MATH 214 .

    An introduction to the theory of real variables, the topology of the real line, convergence and uniform convergence, limits and continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
  
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    MATH 316 - Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry with Applications to Art


    Spring (3) Bolotnikov (College 200, NQR)

    Euclidean Geometry: Plane transformations and inversive geometry;  projective Geometry and perspective; hyperbokic and spherical geometries.   Work of da Vinci, D:urer, and Escher will be considered. (This course is anchored in the NQR domain, and also considers aspects of the ALV domain.)
  
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    MATH 323 - Operations Research: Deterministic Models


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 211  or MATH 210 .

    An introduction to deterministic Operations Research techniques and applications. Topics include search algorithms, simplex search for linear programs, duality and sensitivity analysis for linear programs, shortest path problems, network models and discrete optimization.
  
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    MATH 332 - Graph Theory and its Applications


    Spring (3) Yu Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) or MATH 214   (College 200, NQR, MATH)

    This is an introductory course about graph theory and its applications. It covers graph-theoretic concepts such as paths, Eulerian circuits, trees, distance, matchings, connectivity, network flows, colorings, planarity, and spanning cycles.  It will also apply graph theory concepts in the analysis of social networks, and in the applications of natural and social sciences. (This course is anchored in the NQR domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    MATH 345 - Introduction to Mathematical Biology


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 211  

    An introduction to developing, simulating, and analyzing models to answer biological questions. Mathematical topics may include matrix models, non-linear difference and differential equations, and stochastic models. Biological topics may include ecology, epidemiology, evolution, molecular biology, and physiology.
  
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    MATH 351 - Probability and Statistics for Scientists


    Spring and Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 112  or MATH 132 .

    Basic concepts in probability and statistical inference. Topics include: probability laws, counting techniques, discrete and continuous random variables, probability and cumulative distribution functions, sampling distributions, central limit theorem, point estimation,  confidence intervals and one and two-sample tests of hypotheses. Mathematics majors are encouraged to take the more theoretical courses Math 451 and Math 452. Math 351 cannot not be taken concurrently with Math 451, nor after receiving credit for Math 451.
  
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    MATH 352 - Statistical Data Analysis


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 351  or MATH 451  

    Concepts in statistical data analysis. Topics include: simple and multiple linear regression, nonlinear regression, experimental design, nonparametric statistics and the use of statistical software. Other selected topics for statistical data analysis in order to provide a more in-depth exposure to the practice of statistics.    
  
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    MATH 356 - Random Walks in Biology


    Fall or Spring (3) Shaw Prerequisite(s): (MATH 111  or MATH 131 ) and BIOL 220 Prereq/Corequisite(s): BIOL 225  

    This course introduces random processes in biological systems. It focuses on how biological processes are inherently stochastic and driven by a combination of energetic and entropic factors. Topics include diffusion, cell motility, molecular motors, ion channels, and extinction in populations. (Cross-listed with APSC 456  and BIOL 356 .) 
  
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    MATH 380 - Topics in Mathematics


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and (MATH 212  or MATH 213 ).

    A study of 300-level mathematical topics not covered by existing courses. Topics may be pure or applied. Course may be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
  
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    MATH 400 - Mathematical Connections


    Fall or Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): At least 3 Math courses numbered higher than 300, at least one of which must be Math 307, 311, or at the 400-level (or permission of instructor) (College 400)

    This course gives a guide through the research process in mathematical sciences.  Students will choose a topic on which to research throughout the semester.  Students will give several presentations, give feedback on others' presentations, and will turn in a final paper.
    Math 400 is taken during the senior year and satisfies the College 400 requirement.  Mathematical maturity is needed and is typically indicated by having completed at least 3 Math courses numbered higher than 300, at least one of which must be 307, 311, or at the 400-level.  Otherwise, the course requires permission of the instructor to enroll.
     
  
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    MATH 403 - Intermediate Analysis


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 311 .

    Sequences and series of functions; analysis in metric spaces and normed linear spaces; general integration and differentiation theory.
  
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    MATH 405 - Complex Analysis


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 311 .

    The complex plane, analytic functions, Cauchy Integral Theorem and the calculus of residues. Taylor and Laurent series, analytic continuation.
  
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    MATH 408 - Advanced Linear Algebra


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and MATH 214 .

    Eigenvalues, singular values, matrix factorizations, canonical forms, vector and matrix norms; positive definite, hermitian, unitary and nonnegative matrices.
  
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    MATH 410 - Special Topics in Mathematics


    Fall and Spring (1-3)

    A treatment of topics of interest not routinely covered by existing courses. Material may be chosen from topology, algebra, differential equations and various other areas of pure and applied mathematics. This course may be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.
  
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    MATH 412 - Introduction to Number Theory


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 214 .

    An elementary course in the theory of integers, divisibility and prime numbers, a study of Diophantine equations, congruences, number-theoretic functions, decimal expansion of rational numbers and quadratic residues.
  
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    MATH 413 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis I


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and (MATH 212  or MATH 213 ) and CSCI 141  and MATH 214 .

    A discussion of the mathematical theory underlying selected numerical methods and the application of those methods to problems of practical importance. Computer programs are used to facilitate calculations and illustrate analytical results. The topics covered are: linear systems of equations, sensitivity analysis, least-squares problems, the singular value decomposition, and eigenvalue problems. Students planning to take 414 are encouraged to take 413 first.
  
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    MATH 414 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis II


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and (MATH 212  or MATH 213 ) and CSCI 141  and MATH 214  .

    A discussion of the mathematical theory underlying selected numerical methods and the application of those methods to problems of practical importance. Computer programs are used to facilitate calculations and illustrate analytical results. The topics covered are: nonlinear equations, interpolation and approximation, numerical integration, and numerical methods for the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Students planning to take 414 are encouraged to take 413 first.
  
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    MATH 416 - Topics in Geometry


    Fall of even-numbered years (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and (MATH 212  or MATH 213 ) and MATH 214 .

    A treatment of topics selected from Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, projective geometry, finite geometry, differential geometry or algebraic geometry.
  
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    MATH 417 - Vector Calculus for Scientists


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and (MATH 212  or MATH 213 ) and MATH 302 .

    Directional derivatives, differential forms and the Poincare lemma.  Vector bundles, contact forms and their application to ordinary and partial differential equations.  Applications to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics.
  
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    MATH 424 - Operations Research: Stochastic Models


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 451 .

    A survey of probabilistic operations research models and applications. Topics include stochastic processes, Markov chains, queueing theory and applications, Markovian decision processes, inventory theory and decision analysis.
  
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    MATH 426 - Topology


    Fall of odd-numbered years (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 311 .

    A study of topological spaces, metric spaces, continuity, product spaces, compactness, connectedness and convergence. As time permits, additional topics may be chosen from homotopy theory, covering spaces, manifolds and surfaces, or other topics in algebraic or set theoretic topology.
  
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    MATH 428 - Functional Analysis


    Spring of odd-numbered years (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 311 .

    Introduction to the geometry of Hilbert spaces, bounded linear operators, compact operators, spectral theory of compact self-adjoint operators, integral operators and other applications.
  
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    MATH 430 - Abstract Algebra II


    Spring of odd-numbered years (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 307 .

    The theory of groups, rings, and fields. Topics may include the fundamental theorem of Abelian groups, Sylow's theorem, field extensions, and Galois theory.
  
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    MATH 432 - Combinatorics


    Spring of even-numbered years (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and MATH 214 .

    A study of combinatorial theory and applications to practical problems. Topics include: graph theory, graphical algorithms, enumeration principles, inclusion-exclusion principle, recurrence relations, and generating functions. Optional topics: Polya counting principle, combinatorial designs, coding, Boolean algebra, and switching functions.
  
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    MATH 441 - Ordinary Differential Equations II


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 302 .

    Linear systems of ODEs. Nonlinear systems; dynamical systems, existence/uniqueness of solutions; phase plane analysis; bifurcation; Poincare-Bendixson theory. Applications in biology, circuit theory, and mechanics. Discrete dynamical systems.
  
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    MATH 442 - Partial Differential Equations


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 302 .

    An introduction to partial differential equations. Waves, diffusion, and boundary value problems; Fourier analysis; harmonic functions; Green's function and Green's identity. Introduction to numerical methods for approximating solutions.
  
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    MATH 451 - Probability


    Fall and Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): (MATH 211  or MATH 210 ) and (MATH 212  or MATH 213 ) and MATH 214 .

    Concepts in probability (formerly MATH 401). Topics include: probability laws, counting techniques, discrete and continuous random variables, probability and cumulative distribution functions, marginal and conditional probability distributions, moment generating functions, transformations of random variables,  multivariate transformations, order statistics, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem. Math 451 cannot be taken concurrently with Math 351.
  
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    MATH 452 - Mathematical Statistics


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 451 

    Concepts in statistical inference. Topics include: point and interval estimation, consistency, convergence in distribution, sufficient statistics, minimum variance unbiased estimators, method of moments, maximum likelihood estimation, small and large-sample hypothesis tests, uniformly most powerful tests and likelihood ratio tests.  Math 452 cannot be taken concurrently with Math 351. (formerly MATH 402)
  
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    MATH 459 - Topics in Statistics


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Statistical topics not covered in other courses. Possible topics include: linear models, nonparametric statistics, multivariate analysis, computationally intensive methods. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.
  
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    MATH 490 - Seminar


    Fall and Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 214 .

    Sections of this course will treat a single narrow topic. Possible areas of interest include linear algebra, operator theory, applied analysis, combinatorial theory, operations research, statistics, history of mathematics, mathematical pedagogy and computational mathematics. Students will present written and oral work for discussion in class. May be repeated with permission.
  
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    MATH 495 - Honors


    Fall, Spring (3)

    Students admitted to Honors study in mathematics will be enrolled in this course during both semesters of their senior year. The course comprises: (a) supervised research in the student's special area of interest; (b) presentation by April 15 of an Honors thesis; and (c) satisfactory performance in a comprehensive oral examination in the field of the student's major interest. Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs.
  
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    MATH 496 - Honors


    Fall, Spring (3)

    Students admitted to Honors study in mathematics will be enrolled in this course during both semesters of their senior year. The course comprises: (a) supervised research in the student's special area of interest; (b) presentation by April 15 of an Honors thesis; and (c) satisfactory performance in a comprehensive oral examination in the field of the student's major interest. Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs.

Medieval and Renaissance Studies

  
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    MREN 201 - Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Studies


    Spring (3) Staff (College 200, ALV)

    An introduction to key texts, and scholarly approaches to those sources, between 300 CE and 1600 CE in western Europe. The course is interdisciplinary, with attention to history, literature, art, and music. (This course is anchored in the ALV domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    MREN 351 - Special Topics in the Middle Ages


    Fall and Spring (3-4) Staff

    Exploration of a particular topic in the Middle Ages. Course may be repeated if topic differs.
  
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    MREN 352 - Special Topics in the Renaissance


    Fall and Spring (3-4) Staff

    Exploration of a particular topic in the Renaissance. Course may be repeated if topic differs.

Military Science

  
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    MLSC 101 - Leadership and Personal Development


    Fall (1) Staff

    Introduces students to issues and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer's responsibilities. These initial lessons establish a framework for understanding officership, leadership, and Army values. Additionally, the semester addresses life skills' including fitness and time management. The MLSC 101 course is designed to support recruiting and retention of cadets by giving them accurate insight into the Army Profession and the officer's role in the Army.
  
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    MLSC 102 - Introduction to Tactical Leadership


    Spring (1) Staff

    MLSC 102 overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. You will explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises.
  
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    MLSC 103 - MS I Leadership Laboratory


    Fall/Spring (0) Staff

    Taken with MLSC 101  and MLSC 102 . Presents basic leadership skills in practical situations. Introduces standard Army equipment, marksmanship, orienteering, and small unit tactics, and functioning as a member of a team or squad. Additional fees apply. See the class schedule for details and amounts.
  
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    MLSC 201 - Innovative Team Leadership


    Fall (1) Staff

    This course explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework. Aspects of personal motivation and team building are practiced planning, executing and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. The focus continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership values and attributes through understanding Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies will provide a tangible context for learning the Soldier's Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the contemporary operating environment.
  
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    MLSC 202 - Foundations of Tactical Leadership


    Spring (1) Staff

    This course examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COE). This course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Continued study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. MLSC 202 provides a smooth transition into MLSC 301. Cadets develop greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios.
  
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    MLSC 203 - MS II Leadership Laboratory


    Fall/Spring (0) Staff

    Taken with MLSC 201  and MLSC 202 . Develops intermediate leadership skills by placing cadets in small unit leadership roles in practical situations. Emphasizes acquisition of intermediate individual soldier skills and tactical theory. Advanced Courses These courses are designed to prepare juniors and seniors who have agreed to seek a commission as officers in the United States Army. Freshmen and sophomores may not take the Advanced Courses. Additional fees apply. See the class schedule for details and amounts.
  
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    MLSC 301 - Adaptive Team Leadership


    Fall (2) Staff Prerequisite(s): MLSC 101 , MLSC 102 , MLSC 201 , MLSC 202  or equivalent, and contract status in ROTC

    You are challenged to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive team leadership skills as you are presented with the demands of the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Challenging scenarios related to small unit tactical operations are used to develop self-awareness and critical thinking skills. You will receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership abilities.
  
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    MLSC 302 - Leadership in Changing Environments


    Spring (2) Staff Prerequisite(s): MLSC 301  or consent of department and contract status in ROTC

    You will be challenged to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as you are presented with the demands of the ROTC Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC). Challenging scenarios related to small unit tactical operations are used to develop self-awareness and critical thinking skills. You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leadership abilities. Leadership Lab concentrates on general military subjects directed toward the reinforcement of military skills and the development of new skills required for the ROTC Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC).
  
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    MLSC 303 - MS III Leadership Laboratory


    Fall/Spring (0) Staff

    Taken with MLSC 301  and MLSC 302 . Develops advanced leadership skills by requiring cadets to train and lead units of 10 to 40 fellow cadets. Includes intensive study of Army equipment, techniques and operational doctrine to achieve advanced proficiency and preparation for attending the Leader Development and Assessment Course. Additional fees apply. See the class schedule for details and amounts.
  
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    MLSC 401 - Developing Adaptive Leaders


    Fall (2) Staff Prerequisite(s): MLSC 302 

    MLSC 401 develops student proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. You are given situational opportunities to assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare you to make the transition to becoming an Army officer. During your MSL IV year, you will lead cadets at lower levels. Both your classroom and battalion leadership experiences are designed to prepare you for your first unit of assignment. You will identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use battalion operations situations to each, train, and develop subordinates.
  
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    MLSC 402 - Leadership in a Complex World


    Spring (2) Staff Prerequisite(s): MLSC 302 

    MLSC 402 explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the contemporary operating environment (COE). You will examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. You also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing you for BOLC and your first unit of assignment. It uses case studies, scenarios, and "What Now, Lieutenant?" exercises to prepare you to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as a commissioned officer in the United States Army. This semester you will: Explore Military Professional Ethics and ethical decision making facing an Officer, Gain practical experience in Cadet Battalion Leadership roles, Demonstrate personal skills in operations and communications, Evaluate and develop MSL III small unit leaders and examine issues of force protection in the COE, Prepare for the transition to a career as an Army Officer.
  
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    MLSC 403 - MS IV Leadership Laboratory


    Fall/Spring (0) Staff

    Taken with MLSC 401  and MLSC 402 . Develops advanced leadership and management expertise in the evaluation of subordinates, performance counseling, mentoring and development of programs of training for units of 100 or more members. Additional fees apply. See the class schedule for details and amounts.
  
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    MLSC 404 - Independent Study in Military Science


    Fall or Spring (1) Staff

    This course provides ROTC cadets who have completed their Advance Course program the opportunity to conduct detailed research and independent study on a current problem or topic associated with the military. Program of study will be arranged individually with a faculty advisor; admission by consent of the chair of the department. This course may be repeated as there is no duplication of topic

Modern Languages and Literatures

  
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    MDLL 150 - First Year Seminar


    Fall or Spring (4) Staff (C150)

    An exploration of a specific topic in Modern Languages. A grade of C- or better fulfills the COLL 150 requirement. Although topics vary, the courses emphasize academic writing skills, reading and analysis of texts, and discussion. Course may be repeated for credit if topic varies
  
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    MDLL 498 - Washington Program Internship


    Fall and Spring (4)

    This course combines an internship experience in Washington, D.C. with individual research supervised by the Washington Program instructor and results in a substantial assignment. Only students already accepted into the Washington Program are eligible to enroll.

Music

  
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    MUSC E03 - Wind Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) Staff (ACTV, GER 6)

    The Wind Ensemble is a large performing ensemble composed of woodwind, brass, and percussion instrumentalists that performs the finest wind literature from 16th century to the present day. Both chamber music and large ensemble works are rehearsed and performed. The Wind Ensemble performs several concerts per semester both on and off campus. Non-majors welcome. By audition. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E04 - Concert Choir


    Fall and Spring (1) Armstrong (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E05 - Women's Chorus


    Fall and Spring (1) Bartlett (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E06 - Symphony Orchestra


    Fall and Spring (1) Grandis (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E07 - Botetourt Chamber Singers


    Fall and Spring (1) Bartlett (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E08 - Jazz Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) Beckner (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E09 - Jazz Combo


    Fall and Spring (1) Simon (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E10 - Brass Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) DuBeau (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E11 - Woodwind Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) Carlson (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E12 - String Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) Cary (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E13 - Mixed Ensemble: Gallery Players


    Fall and Spring (1) Via (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E14 - Percussion Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) Lindberg (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E15 - Classical Guitar Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) Olbrych (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E17 - Early Music Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) Staff (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E18 - Middle Eastern Music Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (as available) (1) Rasmussen (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E19 - Opera Workshop


    Fall and Spring (1) Fletcher (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
  
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    MUSC E20 - Saxophone Ensemble


    Fall and Spring (1) Nesbit (ACTV, GER 6)

    Although students may take as many credits as they wish of ensemble courses, a maximum of 14 credits may be applied toward the 120 credits required for a degree by those not majoring in Music. All music ensembles may be repeated for credit
 

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