Aug 21, 2019  
2017 - 2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Environmental Science and Policy

  
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    ENSP 498 - Internship


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and director.

    This course is designed to allow students to gain knowledge through experience in the environmental area, through work with government agencies, nonprofits, or companies. Students will be supervised by faculty members, and students must complete an agreed-upon list of readings and write a paper tying their experience to existing theory and research. Requires written permission from the Director and a faculty advisor.
  
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    ENSP 499 - Internship


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and director.

    This course is designed to allow students to gain knowledge through experience in the environmental area, through work with government agencies, nonprofits, or companies. Students will be supervised by faculty members, and students must complete an agreed-upon list of readings and write a paper tying their experience to existing theory and research. Requires written permission from the Director and a faculty advisor.

European Studies

  
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    EURS 200 - Transfer Elective Credit


  
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    EURS 201 - Introduction to European Studies


    Fall or Spring (3) (College 200, ALV, CSI)

    An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of European Studies. Students explore how Europe has emerged and been contested as an idea, dynamic region, and shared community. Topics include 1) Imagining Europe; 2) The European Mix: Peoples, Ideas, Spaces; and 3) European Integration. This course fulfills the Major Computing Requirement. (This course is anchored in the ALV and CSI domains.) 
  
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    EURS 207 - Film Course in European Studies


    Spring (1)

    This course uses film to explore how Europeans have engaged a range of contemporary cultural, social, and political concerns. Topics change each semester. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    EURS 290 - Topics in European Studies


    Fall or Spring (1-4) Staff

    Selected topics in EURS are offered occasionally. The topic to be considered will be announced prior to the beginning of the semester. These courses may be repeated for credit if the topic varies.
  
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    EURS 300 - Transfer Elective Credit


  
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    EURS 390 - Topics in European Studies


    Fall or Spring (1-4) Staff

    Selected topics in EURS are offered occasionally. The topic to be considered will be announced prior to the beginning of the semester. These courses may be repeated for credit if the topic varies.
  
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    EURS 470 - Research Seminar in European Studies


    Spring (1-4)

    This course explores a European topic of contemporary significance through multidisciplinary readings that span several national contexts. Students develop independent research projects related to the topic. The course fulfills the Major Writing Requirement.
  
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    EURS 480 - Independent Study in European Studies


    Fall or Spring (1-3) Staff

    For majors and minors who have completed most of their requirements and who have secured approval from a supervising instructor. EURS 480 may be repeated for credit, if the topic varies.
  
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    EURS 495 - Senior Honors in European Studies


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff

    Please see the detailed description of the honors process in the opening of the Global Studies catalogue section.
  
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    EURS 496 - Senior Honors in European Studies


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff

    Please see the detailed description of the honors process in the opening of the Global Studies catalogue section.

Expository Writing

  
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    WRIT 101 - Writing.


    Fall and Spring (3) Zuber

    Practice in writing under supervision, with frequent conferences. This course may be used to satisfy the lower-division writing requirement by students who are not exempted. Each section is limited to 16 students.
  
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    WRIT 101A - Writing for Non-Native Speakers


    Fall and Spring (3) Alexander

    For non-native speakers of English. Practice in writing under supervision, with frequent conferences. This course may be used to satisfy the lower-division writing requirement. Instructor permission required.
  
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    WRIT 301 - Crafting the Essay


    Fall or Spring (3)

    Practice in writing essays on various topics emphasizing effective approaches to argumentation.   Sections limited to 15 students each.
  
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    WRIT 399 - Contemporary Theory and College Writing


    Spring (2) Zuber

    This course is designed to train students who have applied to work in the Writing Resources Center by analyzing the writing and speaking processes and the dynamics of one-on-one peer consultations.
  
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    WRIT 401 - Topics in Writing Professionally


    Fall or Spring (1-3) Staff

    Instruction in skills, practices, and styles for careers in writing. Topics may include editing and publishing, technical writing, business writing, and grant writing. If there is no duplication of topic, may be repeated for credit.

Film and Media Studies

  
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    FMST 100 - Big Ideas in Film and Media Studies


    Fall or Spring (4) Staff (College 100)

    An exploration of significant questions and integrative concepts in Film and Media Studies, their grounding in the process of scientific discovery and application, and their broader relevance to society. Designed for first-year students. Although topics vary, the courses also seek to improve students' communication skills beyond the written word.
  
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    FMST 150 - First-Year Seminar


    Fall or Spring (4) Staff

    An introduction to various topics in Film and Media Studies.
  
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    FMST 250 - Introduction to Film and Media Studies


    Fall, Spring (4) Joyce, Lowry, Zuber, Stadelmann, Staff GER 5

    This research- and writing-intensive course introduces methods for critical engagement with texts across different media (e.g., film, digital media, TV, print, recorded music). Students are strongly encouraged to take 250 before enrolling in 300-level courses in the Program.
  
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    FMST 302 - Theories of Film & Media


    Fall (3) Staff

    Explores major theoretical issues in visual culture since the advent of photography, as well as intersections with other theoretical approaches like critical theory, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, critical race theory, and postcolonialism.  This course satisfies the major computing requirement.
  
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    FMST 310 - Topics in Media History


    Fall, Spring (3) Barnard, Joyce, Knight, Prokhorov, Zuber, Staff

    These courses examine the history of a medium/media in social, cultural, and political contexts, with particular attention to the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This course may be repeated for credit when there is no duplication of topic.
  
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    FMST 330 - Topics in Global Media


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff

    These courses focus on the cultural products, values, and identities that emerge and circulate through media produced in and for countries outside the U.S. May be repeated for credit when there is no duplication of topic.
  
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    FMST 350 - History of Documentary


    Fall or Spring (3)

    A historical survey of documentary generes, ranging from ethnographic film to war propaganda to Direct Cinema. Documentaries will be place in their cultural contexts and analyzed according to the theoretical issues they raise.
  
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    FMST 351 - Special Topics in FMST


    Fall or Spring (1 - 3)

    Exploration of a particular topic in Film and/or Media Studies. This course maybe repeated for credit when there is no duplication of topic.
  
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    FMST 370 - Topics: Media in Practice


    Fall, Spring (1-3) Barnard, Davis, Stadelmann, Stock, Zuber

    Introduction to creative practices in film, media, or festival production with an emphasis on collaborative, hands-on projects. May be repeated for credit when there is no duplication of topic.
  
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    FMST 401 - Seminar in Film and Media Studies


    Fall, Spring (3-4) Staff

    Study in depth of a specialized topic in Film and/or Media Studies. This course maybe repeated for credit when there is no duplication of topic.
  
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    FMST 480 - Independent Studies


    Fall or Spring (1-4)

    A program combining (as appropriate to the topic) extensive viewing, production, writing, reading and/or discussion in a specific area of Film and Media Studies. The syllabus for this tutorial will be agreed upon by the student and instructor and approved in advance by the Coordinator. This course is open only to students who have completed at least half the requirements for the Film and Media Studies Minor and may ordinarily only be taken once.
  
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    FMST 495 - Honors


    Fall (3)

  
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    FMST 496 - Honors


    Spring (3)

  
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    FMST 498 - Internship


    Fall or Spring (1 - 4)

    Directed readings/research in conjunction with an internship to be approved by the Advisory Committee. Open only to majors  who have completed at least half their requirements; students may apply no more than 4 credits of internship to their major/minor.

French and Francophone Studies

  
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    FREN 100 - Big Ideas in French & Francophone Studies


    Fall or Spring (4) Staff. (College 100)

    An exploration of significant questions and integrative concepts in French & Francophone Studies, their grounding in the process of scientific discovery and application, and their broader relevance to society. Designed for first-year students. Although topics vary, the courses also seek to improve students' communication skills beyond the written word.
  
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    FREN 101 - Elementary French I


    Fall and Summer (4) Staff

    An introduction to the French language designed to develop basic communicative competence in speaking and writing skills, and basic listening and reading comprehension of cultural materials. Preliminary introduction to selected aspects of the Francophone world. For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website. Four class hours.
  
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    FREN 102 - Elementary French II


    Spring and Summer (4) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 101  

    An introduction to the French language designed to develop basic communicative competence in speaking and writing skills, and basic listening and reading comprehension of cultural materials. Preliminary introduction to selected aspects of the Francophone world.  For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website. Four class hours.
  
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    FREN 201 - Intermediate French I


    Fall and Summer (4) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 102  or placement by Achievement Test score or by department

    A review of basic French grammar through development of writing, speaking, comprehension and reading skills, with additional emphasis on cultural and literary readings. For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website. Four class hours.
  
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    FREN 202 - Intermediate French II


    Spring and Summer (4) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 201  or placement by Achievement Test score or by department

    Continued review of basic French grammar through development of writing, speaking and comprehension skills, with additional emphasis on cultural and literary readings. For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website. Four class hours.
  
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    FREN 206 - Upper-lntermediate Conversation


    Fall, Spring or Summer (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement by Achievement Test score or consent of instructor

    A course beyond the College's foreign language requirement proficiency level stressing the cultural and linguistic notions of oral discourse in developing communicative ability in the language. Practice in simulated foreign cultural contexts through discussion and student presentations on themes in contemporary French life.
  
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    FREN 210 - From Word to Text: An Introduction to Reading and Writing


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement by Achievement Test score or by department (ALV, GER 5)

    Continued development of all four language skills, with a special emphasis on reading and writing. This course will incorporate work with applied grammar, interactive video, film, and French and Francophone literary readings.
  
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    FREN 212 - Cross-cultural Perspectives on the Francophone World


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement by Achievement Test score or by department (GER 4C) (ALV)

    An introduction to comparative cultural studies of the Francophone world. An exploration of the rich cultural exchanges among Francophone communities with an emphasis on their geographical, historical and social contexts. Sustained attention to oral and written expression.
  
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    FREN 299 - French Studies Abroad at the Upper Intermediate Level


    Fall, Spring, or Summer (1-4) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 210  or FREN 212   and approval by department

    This number is intended for courses completed in France or in a Francophone country. May be repeated for credit
  
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    FREN 300 - French Studies Abroad at the Advanced Level


    Fall, Spring, or Summer (1-4) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 210  or FREN 212  and approval by department

    This number is intended for courses completed in France or in a Francophone country. May be repeated for credit
  
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    FREN 301 - Life in Montpellier


    Spring (1) Resident Director of the Summer in Montpellier, France Program

    A one-credit required course designed for students enrolling in the W&M Summer in Montpellier Program. Provides historical and cultural background of the program site, introduces social, cultural, and political trends that inform life in France today and sensitizes students to the media of the region and nation. Taught in French by the Director during Spring semester prior to enrollment in Summer Program.
  
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    FREN 302 - Perspectives on Contemporary Society


    Summer (4) Resident Director of the Summer in Montpellier, France Program

    A required two-credit supervised research project organized around three themes: 1) the ways in which cosmopolitan and pluralist France addresses issues of diversity, 2) the importance of Europe in France today, and 3) the Southern French perspective regarding themes 1 and 2. In French, under the supervision of the Resident Director of the Montpellier Program.
  
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    FREN 303 - Themes and Issues in the French/ Francophone World


    Fall and/or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 151   or FREN 210   or FREN 212  or placement by Achievement Test score, or by instructor's permission.

    Each semester's chosen topic will be indicated in the schedule of classes.
  
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    FREN 304 - French Phonetics and Diction


    Fall or Spring (3) Kulick Prerequisite(s): FREN 206  orFREN 210   or FREN 212  or FREN 303  or consent of instructor (CSI)

    Intensive study of concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonology in modern standard French. Readings in phonetic theory. Diagnostic evaluation of each student's pronunciation. Corrective phonetics.
  
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    FREN 305 - The Craft of Writing


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 210  or FREN 212  or FREN 303  or FREN 151   (ALV)

    Applied grammar and intensive written work. French 305 is a prerequisite for upper-level French courses.
  
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    FREN 306 - Advanced Conversation


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 210  or FREN 212  or FREN 303  , and FREN 206  (or consent of instructor)

    Intensive oral-aural training, with class discussions and oral presentations focusing on relevant issues in contemporary French and francophone society and culture as presented in a variety of texts and media.
  
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    FREN 310 - French Cinema


    Fall or Spring (3) Fauvel Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315  (GER 4A)

    History of the French cinema, including an introduction to film technology and aesthetics. This course is taught in French. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.
  
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    FREN 314 - Introduction to French Cultural Studies


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 305   (College 200, ALV, GER 4A, 5)

    This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary approaches to the study of French and Francophone cultures with a particular focus on the notion of French national identity.  Specific examples will include national mythology and collective memory, the cultural production of nineteenth-century Paris, and the contemporary issues of immigration and multiculturalism as they relate to the history of colonialism.This will introduce students to interdisciplinary approaches to the study of French and Francophone cultures with a particular focus on the notion of French national identity.  Specific examples will include national mythology and collective memory, the cultural production of nineteenth-century Paris, and the contemporary issues of immigration and multiculturalism as they relate to the history of colonialism. (This course is anchored in the ALV domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    FREN 315 - Provocative Texts: French Literature in its Cultural Contexts


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 305   (College 200, ALV, GER 4A, 5)

    What can literature do? This course will test the powers of fiction by studying provocative masterpieces of French & Francophone literature. In the process, we will also consider the material, social, legal, economic, and ideological forces that shaped French & Francophone literary culture over the centuries. (This course is anchored in the ALV domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    FREN 316 - The Middle Ages


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s):  FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    A study of French literature up to 1500: representative works. (Most texts are read in modern French translation.)
  
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    FREN 318 - The Renaissance


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s):

    FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    A study of the major writers of the French Renaissance.

  
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    FREN 321 - The Spectacular Culture of Early Modern France


    Fall or Spring (3) Pacini Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    A history of theater and theatricality in France from the XVIIth to the XVIIIth centuries. Readings include critically acclaimed literary masterpieces, as well as essays that theorize the effects of theater on the evolution of moral, social, and political conventions.
  
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    FREN 331 - Topics in Eighteenth-Century French Literature and Culture


    Fall or Spring (3) Pacini Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    Studies in the literature, history and visual culture of eighteenthcentury France. Topics will vary. This course may be repeated for credit if topics differ
  
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    FREN 332 - Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture


    Fall or Spring (3) Pacini Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    Studies in the literature, history and visual culture of early modern France. Topics will vary. This course may be repeated for credit if topics differ
  
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    FREN 341 - Romanticism as Revolution


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    This course will explore the multiple links between French Romanticism and the series of revolutionary upheavals that shook France beginning in 1789. Students will also discover the impact of this movement on subsequent literary and cultural trends.
  
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    FREN 342 - Inventing Modernity: Nineteenth-Century French Narrative


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    Why is the nineteenth century in France considered the Golden Age of the Novel? This course explores that question by focusing on how writers such as Balzac, Sand, Flaubert, and Zola used narrative in order to construct their own modernity.
  
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    FREN 350 - Modern French Poetry


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    From the post-romantic poets to the present with special emphasis on Baudelaire, the Symbolists and the Surrealists.
  
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    FREN 351 - Twentieth-Century French Literature I


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    A study of the principal novelists up to 1950: Colette, Gide, Proust, Sartre, Camus.
  
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    FREN 352 - Post-war, Post-modern, and Post-colonial


    Fall or Spring (3) Fauvel Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    A study of major post-World War II contemporary novelists and critics in relation to the political and social currents of the age from Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Butor to Duras and Modiano, Toussaint and Redonnet, with reference to critics such as Barthes, Foucault, Derrida,Cixous, and Said.
  
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    FREN 355 - Contemporary Women Writers and Movie Makers from the Francophone World


    Fall or Spring (3) Fauvel Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    Readings selected from French women writers and filmmakers of the 20th and 21st centuries. The course will focus in particular on feminist issues.
  
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    FREN 361 - Culture in Context 1: Art and Ideas


    Fall or Spring (3) M. Leruth Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315   (ALV)

    This course studies French artistic and intellectual production in its varied social contexts from the middle ages through the postmodern period.
  
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    FREN 362 - Culture in Context 2: The Republic


    Fall or Spring (3) M. Leruth Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315   (CSI) (ALV)

    This course studies the key role political institutions, geography, and representations of the past play in the formation of the French idea of nation in the republican era (1789-present).
  
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    FREN 363 - Culture in Context 3: Social Trends


    Fall or Spring (3) M. Leruth Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315  (CSI)

    This course studies contemporary French society, the historical origins of some of its most characteristic structures (e.g., institutions, representations, lifestyles), and the forces of change that have shaped it over the past twenty years.
  
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    FREN 385 - Francophone African Literature I (in French)


    Fall or Spring (3) Compan Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315   (ALV, GER 4B)

    This course explores the sub-Saharan African and Caribbean literature written in French that emerged in the French colonial period and continues in the post-colonial period. Major topics to be examined include Négritude and the rise of political consciousness, cultural conflict with the West, women's voices, Créolité, and postindependence literature.
  
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    FREN 386 - Francophone African Literature II (in English)


    Fall or Spring (3) Compan

    See course description for French 385  . The works for French 386 will be read in English translation and will not duplicate those covered in French 385 . This course cannot be included in the hours required for the major. (Cross listed with AFST 386 .)
  
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    FREN 390 - Topics in French/Francophone Culture and Civilization


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    Topic will be indicated in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit if topic differs
  
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    FREN 391 - Topics in French/Francophone Literature


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    Topic will be indicated in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit if topic differs
  
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    FREN 392 - Topics in French Language


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    Topic will be indicated in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit if topic differs
  
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    FREN 393 - Topics in French/Francophone Cinema


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 

    Topic will be indicated in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit if topic differs
  
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    FREN 394 - Topics in French & Francophone Studies (in English)


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff

    May be repeated for credit if topic is different.
  
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    FREN 406 - Contemporary Spoken French


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 , or consent of instructor

    Intensive training in the contemporary French idiom.
  
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    FREN 408 - Comparative Stylistics and Translation


    Fall or Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): FREN 314  or FREN 315 , or consent of instructor (CSI)

    An intensive course in writing and language analysis. Basic concepts in stylistics applied to writing in French and to the problems of translation.
  
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    FREN 411 - Independent Study


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff

    This course is designed to permit an in-depth study in an area of literature culture or linguistics not available in current course offerings. A written petition to the instructor and approval of the section coordinator are required before registration. May be repeated for credit if topic varies
  
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    FREN 412 - Teaching Practicum


    Fall and Spring (1) Staff

    A mentored teaching internship experience for students to work closely with a faculty member in teaching either a language or content course. May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits
  
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    FREN 413 - Field Research Abroad


    Fall, Spring and Summer (6) Staff Prerequisite(s): 9 credits in French Studies at the 300 level

    A mentored field research experience in French/Francophone culture conducted abroad. Project and related 50-page thesis developed in consultation with a university professor.
  
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    FREN 450 - Seminar in French/Francophone Literature, Language, or Culture


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): At least 9 hours of 300 and/or 400-level French courses (generally FREN 305 , FREN 314  and /or FREN 315 , and higher, or consent of instructor)

    Fulfills the Major Writing Requirement and the Major Computing Requirement.
  
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    FREN 495 - Honors


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): At least 9 hours of 300 and/or 400-level French courses (generally FREN 305 , FREN 314 , FREN 315 , and higher), and French Section approval prior to registration

    Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs or the Charles Center website.
  
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    FREN 496 - Honors


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): At least 9 hours of 300 and/or 400-level French courses (generally FREN 305 , FREN 314 , FREN 315 , and higher), and French Section approval prior to registration

    Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs or the Charles Center website.

Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies

  
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    GSWS 100 - Critical Questions in Gender, Sexuality, and Womens' Studies


    Fall and Spring (4) Staff (College 100)

    An exploration of significant questions and concepts, beliefs and creative visions, theories and discoveries in Gender, Sexuality, and Womens' Studies for first-year students. Although topics vary, the courses also seek to improve students' communication skills beyond the written word.
  
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    GSWS 150 - First Year Seminar


    Fall or Spring (4) (C150)

    An exploration of a specific topic in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies. A grade of C- or better fulfills the COLL 150 requirement. Although topics vary, the courses emphasize academic writing skills, reading and analysis of texts, and discussion.
  
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    GSWS 205 - Introduction to Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies


    Spring (4) Burns, Ozyegin, Putzi, Raitt, Staff (GER 4C)

    An interdisciplinary exploration of sex and gender differences; race and class-based differences and divisions among women; feminist epistemologies and practices. Topics include feminist histories, gender development, body images/representations, "women's work," activisms/subversions. Seminar format and weekly forum.
  
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    GSWS 221 - U.S. Women's History, 1600 to the Present


    Fall, Spring (3) Meyer, Wulf (GER 4A)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the main themes and issues of the field as it has developed in the past two decades. Primary themes throughout this course include: work, sexual/ gender norms and values, women's networks and politics, and how each of these has changed over time and differed for women from diverse cultures/communities. The course divides at 1870. Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (Cross listed with HIST 221 )
  
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    GSWS 222 - U.S. Women's History, 1600 to the Present


    Fall, Spring (3) Meyer, Wulf (GER 4A)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the main themes and issues of the field as it has developed in the past two decades. Primary themes throughout this course include: work, sexual/ gender norms and values, women's networks and politics, and how each of these has changed over time and differed for women from diverse cultures/communities. The course divides at 1870. Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (Cross listed with HIST 222 )
  
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    GSWS 290 - Topics in Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies


    Fall, Spring (1-4) Staff

    A study of a topic in some aspect of feminist scholarship. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.
  
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    GSWS 304 - Gender in Society


    Fall or Spring (3) Bickham Mendez, Slevin (College 200, CSI)

    This course explores different theoretical approaches to gender and its intersections with other sources of inequality such as race, class and age. Possible topics include: gender and sexuality, masculinities, gender and the body, and inequalities in the workplace and home. Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (This course is anchored in the CSI domain, and also considers aspects of the ALV domain.) (Cross listed with SOCL 304 )
  
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    GSWS 305 - Feminist Women Activist for Developing India


    Fall and Spring (3) Fowler (GER 7)

    The class examines the ethical values and interpretations of political engagement, environmental protection and development of three feminist women activists, two Indian and one American, and all internationally reknown for working for the environment and human rights in India: Vandana Shiva, Arundhati Roy, and Martha Nussbaum. (Cross-listed with ENSP 305 )
  
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    GSWS 306 - Women, Gender and Culture


    Spring (3) Kerns Prerequisite(s): ANTH 202 

    An examination of ethnographic research on women and the cultural construction of gender. Emphasis is given to non-Western cultures, with some attention to the contemporary United States. Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (Cross listed with ANTH 306 )
  
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    GSWS 312 - Comparative Sociology


    Fall and Spring (3) Ozyegin (CSI, GER 4B)

    This course explores non-Western societies, including a critical examination of the way in which non-Western cultures have been interpreted in the West. Topics include gender, class, and race-based stratification; family systems; industrialization; urbanization; international migration; globalization; national cultures as "imagined communities." Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (Cross listed with SOCL 312 )
  
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    GSWS 313 - Gender and Postcoloniality


    Fall (3) Staff (GER 7)

    This course focuses on gender and power relationships in discussing: the imposition of European normative values and ideologies within colonial contexts; European identities and normativity as a dynamic and ever emerging process between the metropole and colony; indigenous resistance to European enculturation; indigenous norms, values and ideologies; and the postcolonial legacies of these processes. The course provides critical analysis of European employment of enlightenment thought and emerging ideas on race to justify colonial expansion and oppression. Students will critically examine the historical and ideological claims to legitimacy and power within contemporary nations. Have colonial tools of oppression been employed by nations to maintain gender hierarchies and privilege? This course is discussion intensive. (Cross-listed with ANTH 313 )
  
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    GSWS 314 - Women and Love in Chinese Culture Literature. (In Translation


    Spring (3) Tang (GER 4B, 5)

    This course examines the practice of love or gender relationships in pre-modern China with an emphasis on the presentation of women in literary texts. Readings vary in genres and are analyzed within their own cultural, historical and philosophical context. Taught in English. (Cross listed with CHIN 316 )
  
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    GSWS 315 - Women in Antiquity


    Fall or Spring (3) Spaeth (GER 4A)

    A study, through analysis of dramatic, historical and artistic sources, of the role of women in Greece and Rome. The role of women in the home, in politics and in religion will be discussed, as will the sexual mores involving both heterosexual women and lesbians. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (Cross listed with CLCV 315 )
  
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    GSWS 316 - 20th-Century Italian Women Writers


    Fall or spring (3) Angelone (College 200, ALV, GER 5)

    Twentieth-century Italian women writers will be selected and read. The course will focus attention in particular on feminist issues. (This course is anchored in the ALV domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.) (Cross listed with ITAL 316 .)
  
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    GSWS 317 - Women in Islam


    Fall or Spring (3) Sonn (GER 4B)

    A study of changing status and role of women in Muslim society. The course focuses on the relationship between religion and culture as they shape the lives and options of women in traditional society, in the modern period and in the contemporary Islamic experience. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (Cross listed with RELG 317 )
  
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    GSWS 321 - Women in Africa and the Diaspora


    Fall (3) Sanford (GER 4B, 5)

    This course is a multidisciplinary study of women's organizations and collective agency in a range of African, African-American and African Diasporic settings.  It seeks to understand women's collective actions, often described as "wars," "riots," and "strikes," in the context of their own histories and societies. (Cross listed with AFST 321  )
  
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    GSWS 331 - Feminist Theory and Contemporary Theatre


    Fall or Spring (3) Wolf (GER 7)

    Readings in contemporary feminist theory (psychoanalytic, materialist, Brechtian, and others) as these pertain to the body onstage, character construction, playwriting, and audience reception. Course also investigates feminist performance art, scripts, and revisionings of the dramatic canon. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (Cross listed with THEA 331 )
  
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    GSWS 332 - Sex & Race in Plays & Films: Dramatizing Diversity


    Spring (4) Tanglao-Aguas (College 200, ACTV, ALV, GER 4C, GER 6)

    Study of sexuality, gender and race in plays and films dramatizing marginalized communities in the United States and selected countries like France, Iran, Martinique, Mexico, the Philippines, Senegal, and Turkey. Course work includes acting, creative projects, teaching methods, and analytical essays.  (This course is anchored in the ALV domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.) (Cross listed with AFST 332, AMES 332, APIA 332, and THEA 332.)
  
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    GSWS 350 - The Roman Family


    Fall or Spring (3) Swetnam-Burland (College 200, ALV, CSI)

    This course treats the social structure of Roman families and the spaces in which they resided.  The material includes
    literary sources, inscriptions, and archaeological remains from sites like Pompeii and Ostia. Class topics include:  nutrition, weddings, funerals, and education.    (This course is anchored in the ALV and CSI domains.)  (Cross-listed with  .)
  
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    GSWS 355 - Sport and Gender


    Fall and Spring (3) Hall

    A study of women's involvement in sport, the meaning of this participation and the social ramifications of women's inclusion in and exclusion from sport. Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor.
  
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    GSWS 375 - Feminist Research Methods


    Spring (4) Putzi, Staff

    An interdisciplinary course designed to acquaint students with the prevalent conceptual models and research methods used in feminist scholarship. Students will develop research projects based on the methodologies studied, and will present their findings at the end of the course. Fulfills either the Social Science or the Humanities requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/ minor, and the major computing proficiency requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major.
 

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