May 25, 2019  
2017 - 2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies

  
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    GSWS 380 - Rhymes with Witch: Sexual Politics in Contemporary Culture


    Spring (3) Gray

    This course investigates contemporary sexual politics including: representations of "Woman" and what women have been doing about them; postmodern "gender bending" in theory and practice; relationships among identity constructs such as gender, race, and sexuality; what happens when women aren't "nice." Fulfills either the Social Science or the Humanities requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor.
  
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    GSWS 390 - Topics in Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies


    Fall, Spring (1-4) Staff

    An in-depth study of a topic in some aspect of feminist scholarship. Check with Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies for topic descriptions.
  
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    GSWS 390A - Topics in Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies-Humanities


    Fall, Spring (1-4) Staff

    An in-depth study of a topic in some aspect of feminist scholarship. Check with Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies or the registration bulletin for topic descriptions. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. May be repeated for credit
  
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    GSWS 390B - Topics in Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies-Social Sciences


    Fall, Spring (1-4) Staff

    An in-depth study of a topic in some aspect of feminist scholarship. Check with Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies or the registration bulletin for topic descriptions. Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. May be repeated for credit
  
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    GSWS 405 - Feminist Theory


    Fall (3) Staff (GER 7)

    An in-depth examination of contemporary feminist theories in relation to various disciplines of the humanities and social sciences as they interface with complexities of difference raised by issues of gender, race, class, and sexuality. Fulfills either the Humanities or the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies minor.
  
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    GSWS 414 - Major African American Women Writers


    Spring (3) McLendon, Braxton, Pinson

    This course studies the fiction and non-fiction of major African American women writers such as Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Gloria Naylor. Some attention to black feminist/ womanist and vernacular theoretical issues through selected critical readings. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. (Cross listed with ENGL 414A  or AFST 414  )
  
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    GSWS 416 - Literature and the Formation of Sexual Identity


    Spring (3) Heacox

    A study of the homosexual tradition and the formation of sexual identity in 19th and 20th century British and American literature. Authors include: Oscar Wilde, E.M. Forster, Willa Cather, Thomas Mann, Christopher Isherwood, Sigmund Freud and Michel Foucault. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/ minor (Cross listed with ENGL 416A )
  
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    GSWS 420 - Topics in Gender and Sexuality in Popular Culture


    Fall (3-4) Staff

    Study of historical and contemporary representations of gender and sexuality in popular culture, with a focus on the production, consumption, and reception of texts.  Primary texts may include new media, film, television shows, magazines, popular fiction, and/or music. Topics vary from semester to semester. If there is no duplication of topic, may be repeated for credit.
  
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    GSWS 430 - Comparative Studies in Gender and Work


    Fall or Spring (3) Ozyegin, Bickham Mendez Prerequisite(s): Recommended for juniors and seniors (CSI, GER 4B)

    A multidisciplinary examination of work and gender in the global economy. Topics include: constructing gender at work; occupational segregation by gender, race, and ethnicity; national and transnational labor migration; immigrants' work in the United States; and movements towards gender equality. Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor (Cross listed with SOCL 430 )
  
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    GSWS 480 - Independent Study


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff

    For majors who have completed most of their requirements and who have secured approval of the instructor(s) concerned. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits
  
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    GSWS 490 - Senior Seminar


    Fall or Spring (3-4)

    In-depth study of a specialized topic relevant to Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies. Work in this course will reflect senior-level research. Check with Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies or the registration bulletin for topic descriptions. May be repeated for credit
  
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    GSWS 492 - Women and the Law


    Fall or Spring (3) Grover

    This course will focus on the status and treatment of women in and under the law. It will be organized around the themes of women and work, women and the family, and women and health. Foundations for discussion will include readings of cases, legislation, historical and social science materials and jurisprudential work. Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies major/minor. Note: (Students must return to campus in time to attend when Law School classes start, usually one full week before undergraduate classes.) (Cross listed with PUBP 600 02 and LAW 492 01)
  
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    GSWS 495 - Honors


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff

    Students admitted to Honors study in Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies will be enrolled in this course during both semesters of their senior year. Each candidate will be responsible for: (a) formulating a program of study in consultation with a faculty advisor; (b) submission by April 15 of an Honors essay; (c) satisfactory performance in an oral examination on the subject of the Honors essay. Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs.
  
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    GSWS 496 - Honors


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff

    Students admitted to Honors study in Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies will be enrolled in this course during both semesters of their senior year. Each candidate will be responsible for: (a) formulating a program of study in consultation with a faculty advisor; (b) submission by April 15 of an Honors essay; (c) satisfactory performance in an oral examination on the subject of the Honors essay. Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs.
  
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    GSWS 498 - Internship


    Fall and Spring (1-3)

    Note: May be repeated for a total of 6 credits Graded Graded pass/fail

Geology

  
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    GEOL 100 - Key Concepts in the Earth & Environmental Sciences


    Fall or Spring (4) Staff (College 100)

    An exploration of significant questions and integrative concepts in Earth & Environmental Sciences, their grounding in the process of scientific discovery and application, and their broader relevance to society. Designed for first-year students. Although topics vary, the courses also seek to improve students' communication skills beyond the written word.
  
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    GEOL 101 - The Dynamic Earth: Physical Geology


    Fall and Spring (3) Kaste, Streit (College 200, NQR, GER 2A)

    An investigation of the major features of the earth and its materials and the interaction of the geologic processes active on the surface and in the interior of the earth. Topics include volcanoes, rivers, glaciers, earthquakes, natural resources, and global change. The lab course, GEOL 160 , is optional. (This course is anchored in the NQR domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    GEOL 110 - Earth's Environmental Systems: Physical Geography


    Fall and Spring (3) Bailey, Balascio, Lockwood, Staff (College 200, NQR, GER 2A)

    Introduction to the interactions between the earth's environmental systems - the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and solid earth. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between the environment and the human condition. The lab course, GEOL 160 , is optional. (This course is anchored in the NQR domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    GEOL 160 - Investigating the Earth: Introductory Geology Laboratory


    Fall and Spring (1) Morse, Staff Prereq/Corequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110 . (NQR)

    Investigating the Earth through exercises involving observations and interpretations of maps, minerals and rocks, groundwater and streams, coastal processes, and earthquakes. Field trips and laptop computer are required.  This course may be taken concurrently or after taking GEOL 101  or GEOL 110 .

      Three laboratory hours. There is a fee associated with the laboratory.

  
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    GEOL 250 - Geologic Evolution of Virginia


    Spring (3) Jiron, Morse Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOL 100, 101, 110, 150, 303, 307, 312

    The geology and landscapes of Virginia are remarkably diverse.  This second-level Geology course will investigate the geological processes that work to both create and modify the distinctive landscapes, watersheds, bedrock, and fossils of Virginia.  The course is hands-on with specific modules that require observation, data collection, hypothesis testing, and critical thinking, both in the field and lab. The focus on Virginia's geological evolution will be used to introduce a wide-range of earth science topics and skills: these include earth materials, deep time, tectonic processes, surface processes, climate, and sea-level change.  Although activities will focus on Virginia, the concepts learned can be applied anywhere on the Earth. Students who plan to major or minor in Geology must take this course.
  
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    GEOL 303 - Age of Dinosaurs


    Fall or Spring (3) Lockwood Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110 . (College 200, NQR)

    In this course, we'll use dinosaurs and the Mesozoic world to explore concepts of geologic time, extinction, climate change, evolution, and plate tectonics. Emphasis will also be placed on how science works and major discoveries in dinosaur paleontology. (This course is anchored in the NQR domain, and also considers aspects of the ALV domain.)
  
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    GEOL 305 - Environmental Geology


    Spring (3) Kaste Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110 , and  . Offered alternate years. (NQR)

    The application of geology toward understanding the connections between human activities and the environment. Topics include climate change, flooding and water pollution, coastal processes, and natural hazard prediction.
  
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    GEOL 307 - Planetary Geology


    Spring (3) Bailey Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110 . (NQR)

    An investigation of planetary bodies in the Solar System. Topics include celestial mechanics, the formation of planets and satellites, planetary surfaces, and planetary atmospheres.
  
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    GEOL 310 - Regional Field Geology


    Spring, Summer (1-3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110 , and GEOL 160 , and instructor consent. (NQR)

    Field techniques and their application in the study of the geology and geologic history of selected regions. This course may be repeated for credit. One to four-week field trip with pre-field trip lecture sessions. Fee Required.
  
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    GEOL 311 - Field Methods in the Earth Sciences


    Fall (3) Bailey Prerequisite(s): GEOL 200. (NQR)

    Field techniques and their application to solve geological and environmental problems. Topics include GPS surveying, topographic surveying, bedrock and surficial mapping, and introduction to geophysical methods. Required field trips.
  
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    GEOL 312 - Global Climate Change


    Spring (3) Balascio (College 200, NQR)

    An introduction to Earth's climate system and the causes of climate variability on different geologic timescales. This course will also cover recent climate changes with lessons focussed on the influence of anthropogenic activity and predictions about future climate trends and their potential impacts on society. (This course is anchored in the NQR domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    GEOL 314 - Watershed Dynamics


    Spring (4) Chambers, Hancock Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W  or   or  .

    This team-taught course will combine biologic and hydrologic approaches to explore the interactions between the physical, biological, and chemical processes active in watersheds. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how interactions between these processes control water quality and biologic diversity, and how anthropogenic activities modify these processes. Laboratory is required. (Cross listed with ENSP 201 )
  
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    GEOL 315 - Hydrology


    Spring (4) Hancock Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W , and MATH 111 , and GEOL 160 .

    Quantitative investigation of the major components of the hydrologic cycle and their interactions, including atmospheric water, surface water, and groundwater. Field trips required.
  
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    GEOL 316 - Environmental Geochemistry


    Fall (3) Kaste Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W , and CHEM 103  and GEOL 160 .

    This course examines the chemical interactions among water, rock, and biota. We will investigate the basic inorganic and organic chemistry of nutrients, metals, and carbon. Topics covered include weathering, oceanic and terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and heavymetal deposition.
  
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    GEOL 320 - Earth Surface Processes


    Fall (4) Hancock Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W , and GEOL 160 .

    A quantitative investigation of processes that act to shape the Earth's surface. Explores the links between surface processes, tectonics, and climate; the mechanics and rates of landscape processes and evolution; and the movement of water on and near the surface.
  
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    GEOL 321 - Rock-Forming Minerals


    Fall (4) Owens Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W , and GEOL 160 .

    An introduction to the structures, compositions, characteristic features, and uses of the most common minerals. This course will emphasize the fundamental role that minerals play as the building blocks of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. Field trips.
  
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    GEOL 322 - The Sedimentary Record


    Spring (4) Macdonald Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W , and GEOL 160 .

    An introduction to the origin and interpretation of sediments, fossils, and sedimentary rocks with a focus on depositional environments, paleoclimates, and the use of sediments, fossils, and sedimentary rocks in the interpretation of earth history. Field trips.
  
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    GEOL 323 - Earth Structure & Dynamics


    Spring (4) Bailey Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W , and GEOL 160 .

    An introduction to the internal structure of the earth and its dynamics. Geological and geophysical characteristics of the earth are used to understand tectonic processes. Examines major earth structures and investigates the physics of deformation. Field trips.
  
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    GEOL 330 - Introduction to Marine Science


    Spring (3) Bronk, Weng Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W . (NQR)

    This course provides an overview of physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes operating in the world ocean. The interdisciplinary nature of marine science is emphasized, providing an integrated view of factors that control ocean history, circulation, chemistry and biological productivity. (Cross listed with BIOL 230  and MSCI 330 )
  
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    GEOL 403 - Introduction to Geological Research I


    Fall (1) Staff

    Analysis of journal articles, discussion of research topics, and instruction in the use of library resources including electronic databases. Class work will include oral and written presentations. Enrollment is restricted to geology majors, normally in their junior year.
  
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    GEOL 404 - Introduction to Geological Research II


    Spring (1) Staff

    Students will develop a formal research proposal for a senior research or Honors project in consultation with their research advisor. Students will give an oral presentation to the class describing their research proposal. Class work will include discussion of research sources and questions, training in research techniques, and preliminary data collection and interpretation. Enrollment is restricted to geology majors, normally in their junior year.
  
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    GEOL 407 - Special Topics in Geology


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Advanced study of topics not routinely covered by existing courses. Subjects, prerequisites and instructor will vary from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit.
  
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    GEOL 409 - Independent Study in Geology


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff

    A program for geology majors who wish to pursue independent study of a problem or topic in geology. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    GEOL 422 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology


    Spring (3) Owens Prerequisite(s): GEOL 321 .

    Mineral and rock genesis in the igneous and metamorphic environments. A study of hand specimens and thin sections, structures, textures, and areal distribution. Field trips.
  
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    GEOL 423 - Paleontology


    Spring (3) Lockwood Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 110  or GEOL 150W , or both   and  .

    The taxonomy of fossil organisms and the role of fossils in the study of organic evolution and the time relations of rock sequences. The laboratory stresses invertebrate morphology and quantitative measurement of local marine fossils. Field trips. (Cross listed with BIOL 317 )
  
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    GEOL 424 - Sedimentology Seminar


    Fall (1-3) Lockwood Prerequisite(s): GEOL 322 .

    Advanced seminar in topics in Sedimentology.
  
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    GEOL 425 - Structural Geology Seminar


    Fall (1-3) Prerequisite(s): GEOL 323 .

    Advanced seminar in topics in Structural Geology.
  
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    GEOL 426 - Paleobiology Seminar


    Fall or Spring (1-3) Lockwood Prerequisite(s): GEOL 423 .

    Advanced seminar in topics in Paleobiology.
  
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    GEOL 427 - Surface Processes Seminar


    Spring (1-3) Hancock Prerequisite(s): GEOL 320 .

    Advanced seminar in topics in Surface Processes.
  
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    GEOL 428 - Geochemistry Seminar


    Fall (1-3) Kaste Prerequisite(s): GEOL 316 .

    Advanced seminar in topics in Geochemistry.
  
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    GEOL 429 - Hydrology Seminar


    Fall or Spring (1-3) Hancock Prerequisite(s): GEOL 314  or GEOL 315 .

    Advanced seminar in topics in Hydrology.
  
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    GEOL 437 - Special Topics Seminar


    Fall or Spring (1-3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101 , GEOL 110 , GEOL 150W , GEOL 160 .

    Advanced seminar.
  
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    GEOL 491 - Senior Research


    Fall (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GEOL 404 .

    Independent senior research study, culminating in a written thesis and a formal presentation in the Spring semester.
  
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    GEOL 492 - Senior Research


    Spring (1) Staff Prerequisite(s): GEOL 404 .

    Independent senior research study, culminating in a written thesis and a formal presentation.
  
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    GEOL 495 - Honors


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GEOL 404 .

    The requirements of Honors study in geology include a program of research accompanied by readings from the original literature, the satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination in geology, and the preparation and presentation of an Honors essay based on the student's reading and research. Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see the Department Honors section of the catalog under Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree. Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see the Department Honors section of the catalog under Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree.
  
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    GEOL 496 - Honors


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GEOL 404 .

    The requirements of Honors study in geology include a program of research accompanied by readings from the original literature, the satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination in geology, and the preparation and presentation of an Honors essay based on the student's reading and research. Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see the Department Honors section of the catalog under Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree. Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see the Department Honors section of the catalog under Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree.

German Studies

  
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    GRMN 100 - Critical Questions and Big Ideas in German Studies


    Fall and Spring (4) Staff (College 100)

    An exploration of significant questions and concepts, beliefs and creative visions, theories and discoveries in German Literary and Cultural Studies and the Humanities for first-year students. Although topics vary, the courses also seek to improve students' communication skills beyond the written word. Sample topics might include: Friendship, The Idea of Justice from Ancient Times to the Present, What is Literature?
  
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    GRMN 101 - Elementary German I


    Fall (4) Staff

    Training in grammar, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. All scheduled sessions associated with the course are required. For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website.
  
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    GRMN 102 - Elementary German II


    Spring (4) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 101  

    Training in grammar, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. All scheduled sessions associated with the course are required. For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website.
  
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    GRMN 150 - First-Year Seminar


    Fall and Spring (4) Staff (College 150)

    An exploration of a specific topic in German Studies. A grade of C- or better fulfills the COLL 150 requirement. Although topics vary, the courses emphasize academic writing skills, reading and analysis of texts, and discussion. Sample topics might include: Responses to the Holocaust, Bombing Germany, The Fairy Tale, Expressionism in Literature, Art and Film.
  
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    GRMN 201 - Intermediate German I


    Fall (4) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 102  or equivalent

    Training in grammar, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. All scheduled sessions associated with the course are required. For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website.
  
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    GRMN 202 - Intermediate German II


    Spring (4) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 201  or equivalent

    Readings of German cultural and literary texts. Training in pronunciation, speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing. All scheduled sessions associated with the course are required. For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website.
  
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    GRMN 203 - Combined Intermediate German


    Fall (4) Gülly Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor

    An intensive course for heritage speakers and highly motivated students who have completed GRMN 102 or the equivalent and wish to master the material of GRMN 201 and GRMN 202 in one semester. Intermediate German grammar, pronunciation, listening comprehension, reading and writing are all covered. Successful completion of GRMN 203 fulfills the College Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement. For additional placement information, please see the Modern Languages and Literatures website.
  
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    GRMN 204 - Preparation for Study Abroad


    Spring (1) Staff (ALV)

    Includes practical training in everyday life skills, abroad cultural sensitivity and the ways to get the most out of study abroad. Required of all participants in William & Mary summer study abroad programs in German-speaking countries.
  
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    GRMN 205 - Reading German Children's Literature: Intensive Reading and Grammar Review


    Fall (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 202  or equivalent (ALV, CSI)

    An intensive reading and grammar course focusing on canonical children's books including texts by the Grimms, Kaestner, Ende and others. Students will read several children's books, write short essays and give oral presentations.
  
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    GRMN 206 - Upper-lntermediate Conversation


    Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 202  or equivalent (ALV)

    A course beyond the College's foreign language requirement proficiency level stressing the cultural and linguistic notions of oral discourse in developing communicative ability in the language. Practice in simulated foreign cultural contexts through discussion and student presentations on themes in contemporary German life.
  
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    GRMN 207 - Introduction to German Cultural Studies


    Fall (3) Campbell Prerequisite(s): GRMN 202  or equivalent (College 200, ALV, GER 4A, 5)

    Introduction to the methodologies of German Studies. The course examines the construction of culture and the ways it is studied. Serves as an introduction to the major concentration in German Studies and as a prerequisite for 300-level courses. (This course is anchored in the ALV domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)
  
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    GRMN 210 - Topics in German Language


    Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 205  or GRMN 206  or consent of instructor

    Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
  
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    GRMN 220 - Survey of German Cinema. Taught in English


    Spring (3) (ALV)

    A chronological overview of the history of German cinema. Screenings outside of class. Lecture and discussion.
  
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    GRMN 221 - German Fairy Tales and National Identity


    Spring (3) Staff

    In English. An examination of the role of German fairy tales in the development of national identity in 19th Century Germany. Lecture and discussion.
  
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    GRMN 287 - Topics in German Studies (Taught in English)


    Fall and Spring (3-4) Staff (ALV)

    Students with advanced language skills, with consent of instructor, may take a 4th credit for reading and discussions (one additional hour per week) in the original language.

      Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.

  
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    GRMN 290 - Topics in German Studies


    Fall, Spring, Summer (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 202  or equivalent (ALV)

    Taught in German. Topics will be indicated in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
  
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    GRMN 306 - From Page to Stage


    Fall (3) Gully Prerequisite(s): GRMN 207  or consent of instructor

    In this course, we will read a handful of "classic" plays from German literary history, research the numerous and often controversial productions that these plays see even today, and realize how large of a presence the theater has occupied, and continues to occupy, in German cultural life and national identity. Careful analysis of historical context, dramaturgy, and the most important historical performances of the plays. An important component of this class will be your own performances and video tapings of select scenes, where alongside your analysis you will also hone your speaking and pronunciation skills. Authors may include Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Büchner, Wedekind, Schnitzler, von Horvath, Bauer, Bernhard. Conducted in German.
  
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    GRMN 307 - The German Speaking Peoples and Their Civilization


    Fall (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 206  or GRMN 207   (ALV, GER 4A, 5)

    This course presents the most important elements of Germanic civilization and is designed as an introductory step to other 300-level courses. It includes illustrated lectures, readings and films.
  
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    GRMN 310 - Advanced German Grammar and Stylistics


    Fall (3) Leventhal Prerequisite(s): GRMN 205  or GRMN 206  or GRMN 207  or consent of instructor

    This is an advanced language course for students who wish to further and deepen their competency in German. Difficult aspects of syntax, semantics, and pragmatics will be covered. Advanced stylistics, levels of discourse, and methods of formulation will be practiced through close analysis of different types of texts and essay writing.
  
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    GRMN 312 - Modern German Critical Thought I: 1670-1830. (Taught in English)


    Spring (3-4) Leventhal (ALV, GER 7)

    Examination of important German philosophical texts 1670 - 1830, which address such questions as the public vs. the private, the validity of moral and aesthetic judgment, the claims of interpretation, and the nature of political power. Students with advanced language skills, with the consent of instructor, may take a 4th credit for reading and discussions (one additional hour per week) in the original language.
  
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    GRMN 313 - Modern German Critical Thought II: 1830 to the Present. (Taught in English)


    Fall (3-4) Leventhal (ALV, CSI, GER 7)

    Examination of important German philosophical texts 1830 to the present which address such questions as the validity of moral and aesthetic judgment, the claims of interpretation, the nature of political power and the individual's relation to political power. Students with advanced language skills, with the consent of instructor, may take a 4th credit for reading and discussions (one additional hour per week) in the original language.
  
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    GRMN 320 - Modern German Literature 1750 to the Present


    Fall (3) Leventhal Prerequisite(s): GRMN 205  or GRMN 206  or consent of instructor. (ALV, CSI, GER4A, 5)

    An introduction to German literary studies and the history of modern German literature from 1750 to the present through the close reading and analysis of selected texts in their historical-cultural contexts. Authors to be considered include Lessing, Schiller, Goethe, Hoffmann, Kleist, Büchner, Heine, Droste-Hülshoff, Hauptmann, Hofmannsthal, Kafka, Celan, Grass, and Bachmann.
  
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    GRMN 333 - Nature, Place and Heimat: the German Idea of Home


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 205  or GRMN 206  or consent of instructor (ALV, CSI)

    "Heimat "or "home" is a key concept in German-speaking culture, and one which, it is claimed, cannot be translated. This course will explore what Heimat can mean and how it is constructed. Themes will include provincial life, eco-literature and the German relationship to the forest, as well as the particularly German genres of Heimat literature, poetry and film.
  
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    GRMN 334 - The German City


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 205  or GRMN 206  or consent of instructor. (ALV)

    Thinking, imagining and filming the city requires preliminary theoretical work (Mumford, Lefebvre, Benjamin, Agamben). Each iteration of this course will then examine issues of politics, culture, race, gender, class, temporality, individuality, nationalism and national identity through an in-depth analysis of one or more cities. 
  
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    GRMN 335 - Germans in Exile


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 205  or GRMN 206  or consent of instructor (ALV)

    In this course we will read selected texts about or from German artists, politicians and thinkers who lived and worked in exile. Each instructor will organize the course around certain groups of exiles and/or specific questions raised by exile.
  
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    GRMN 386 - Literature, Science, and Culture in Germany, 1700-1850


    Fall (3) Leventhal Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing. (College 200, ALV)

    This course deals with the emergence of the life sciences and the "sciences of man" (anthropology, philology, and political economy) in German speaking territories at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th century, and the differentiation of such disciplines as zoology, biology, botany, physiology, comparative anatomy and chemistry from "natural history and philosophy." While the human and life sciences are given special emphasis, the developments in math and physics (Bernoulli, Euler) in this era will also be studied. (This course is anchored in the ALV domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI and NQR domains.)
  
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    GRMN 387 - Topics in German Studies. (Taught in English)


    Fall and Spring (3-4) Staff

    Topic will be indicated in the schedule of classes.  Students with advanced language skills, with the consent of instructor, may take a 4th credit for reading and discussions (one additional hours per week) in the original language.

      Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.

  
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    GRMN 390 - Topics in German Studies. (Taught in German)


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff

    Taught in German. Topic will be indicated in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
  
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    GRMN 391 - Independent Research Abroad


    Fall and Spring (3-4) Prerequisite(s): GRMN 102 

    Independent research conducted abroad, either independently, or on a study-abroad program. May be repeated if research theme is different
  
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    GRMN 408 - Senior Seminar in German Studies


    Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): GRMN 207  and GRMN 307 

    This course is intended to serve as the capstone experience in the German Studies major. Each seminar is organized around a specific topic (Humor in German Literature, German Women Writers, etc.) which will change each year, and students will write and present individual research projects related to the seminar theme. Qualified non-seniors may take the course with permission of the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
  
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    GRMN 409 - Advanced Topics in German Studies. (Taught in English)


    Fall and Spring (1-4) Staff

    Taught in English. Topic will be indicated on the Schedule of Classes, and will vary. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
  
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    GRMN 410 - Topics in German Studies (Taught in German)


    Fall (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): One 300-level course in German literature or culture

    Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
  
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    GRMN 411 - Independent Study


    Fall or Spring variable Staff Prereq/Corequisite(s): Two other 400-level German courses (401-410) or consent of instructor (ALV)

    This course is designed to permit an in-depth study in an area of literature not available in current course offerings. A written petition to the instructor and approval of the Coordinator for German are required before registration. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
  
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    GRMN 412 - Teaching Practicum


    Fall and Spring (1) Staff (ACTV)

    A mentored teaching internship experience for students to work closely with a faculty member in teaching either a language or content course.
  
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    GRMN 417 - German Detective Fiction


    Fall (3) Campbell Prerequisite(s): GRMN 300 level course or consent of instructor (ALV)

    This is an advanced seminar that investigates both the theory and the genre of detective fiction in the German-speaking world and exposes the student to specific practices and methodologies of German Studies. Authors to be discussed includee Dürrenmatt, Brecht, Biermann, Arjouni, Gercke, Rüster, and others.
  
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    GRMN 420 - The Enlightenment in Germany


    Fall/Spring (3) Leventhal Prerequisite(s): A GRMN 300-level class or consent of instructor (ALV)

    What was the German Enlightenment, and how did it differ from its European counterparts? How did key Enlightenment figures seek to unify science, religion, aesthetics, politics and morality? Readings from Leibniz, Wolff, Thomasius, Mendelssohn, Nicolai, Lessing, Herder, Kant as well as the critical reception by Marx, Hegel, Adorno and Habermas.
  
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    GRMN 421 - The Turn of the Century: Vienna and Berlin


    Fall/Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): A GRMN 300-level class or consent of instructor (ALV)

    An investigation of Berlin and Vienna at the turn of the 19th century, with a focus on the notion of the modern. Readings of literary texts, dramas, art movements and scientific/philosophical movements.
  
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    GRMN 422 - The Weimar Republic


    Fall/ Spring (3) Campbell, Taylor Prerequisite(s): A GRMN 300-level class or consent of instructor

    What was the Weimar Republic, and why did it ultimately fail? This course offers a close look at Germany in the 1920's through reading the works of writers, artists, journalists and filmmakers from the only German republic before Nazism.
  
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    GRMN 423 - The GDR and the Unification of Germany


    Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): A GRMN 300-level class or consent of instructor

    This class investigates the former German Democratic Republic and the unification of the two Germanies as they are represented in official government publications as well as in literature and film. Readings include texts by Christa Wolf, Stefan Heym and films such as 'Run, Lola Run' and 'Good-Bye, Lenin.'
  
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    GRMN 424 - The Holocaust in German Literature and Film


    Fall (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): A GRMN 300-level class or consent of instructor (ALV)

    How is the Holocaust represented in German literature and film? Is this a Jewish or a German story? How do German Jews and non-Jews write about it? We will read several important literary texts, poems and films which attempt to work through this terrible period in German history.
  
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    GRMN 491 - Advanced Independent Research Abroad


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff

    Advanced independent research conducted abroad, either independently, or on a study-abroad program May be repeated if research theme is different.
  
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    GRMN 495 - Honors


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff Prereq/Corequisite(s): Two other 400-level German courses (401-410)

    Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs
  
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    GRMN 496 - Honors


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff Prereq/Corequisite(s): Two other 400-level German courses (401-410)

    Note: For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs

Global Studies

  
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    GBST 150 - First-Year Seminar


    Fall and Spring (4) Staff (College 150)

    An exploration of a specific topic in Global Studies. A grade of C- or better fulfills the COLL 150 requirement. Although topics vary, the courses emphasize academic writing skills, reading and analysis of texts, and discussion. Sample topics might include: globalization, migration, and nationalism.
  
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    GBST 390 - Topics in Global Studies


    Fall or Spring (1-4) Staff

    Selected topics in Global Studies are offered occasionally. The topic to be considered will be announced prior to the beginning of the semester. These courses may be repeated for credit.
  
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    GBST 391 - Short Course in Global Studies


    Fall or Spring (1) Staff

    Selected topics in Global Studies are offered occasionally. The topic to be considered will be announced prior to the beginning of the semester. These courses may be repeated for credit.
  
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    GBST 480 - Independent Study in Global Studies


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    For majors who have completed most of their major requirements and who have secured approval from a supervising instructor. A Global Studies major can include no more than six hours of independent study. These courses may be repeated for credit, if the topic varies.
  
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    GBST 495 - Senior Honors in Global Studies


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff

    Please see the detailed description of the honors process in the opening of the Global Studies catalogue section.
  
  •  

    GBST 496 - Senior Honors in Global Studies


    Fall, Spring (3) Staff

    Please see the detailed description of the honors process in the opening of the Global Studies catalogue section.
 

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