May 24, 2022  
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Explanation of Course Descriptions

Graduate courses may be taken by persons other than regular or provisional graduate students in Arts and Sciences only with the consent of the chairperson of the department/program committee concerned.

Pairs of numbers (501,502) indicate continuous courses. A hyphen between numbers (501-502) indicates that the courses must be taken in the succession stated.

Courses involving laboratory or studio activity are so labeled. All others are classroom courses.

Semester hour credit for each course is indicated by numbers in parentheses.

 

 

American Studies

  
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    AMST 500 - American Material Culture


    Fall 3 Staff.

    This course uses a series of case studies to approach the material worlds of people in the United States, past and present. Studies vary but may focus on ethnic groups like the 19th century Pennsylvania Germans, the construction of regions such as Appalachia, the special circumstances of the Hmong and other refugees, the classification of objects as ‘folk’ or ‘fine,’ and the alteration of landscapes or structured environments over time. Each case study serves the dual functions of illuminating the role of material life in making and maintaining American identities and of introducing an interdisciplinary array of methods, fields of inquiry, and theories that assist interpretation of artifacts and their contexts. (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 515 - Cultural Politics of Art


    Fall 3 Staff.

    Exploration of the cultural and political world of art as experienced by artists, museum visitors, gallery owners, teachers, collectors, curators, critics, and charlatans. Class discussions will consider anthropological and art historical perspectives in addressing questions central to both disciplines. (Not offered in 2013-2014) Cross-listed with [ANTH 586 ]

  
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    AMST 518 - Material Life in African America


    Fall 3 Gundaker

    This seminar explores the world of things that African Americans have made and made their own in what is now the United States from the colonial era through the present. Topics include landscapes of enslavement and freedom, labor practices, architecture, foodways, objects, aesthetics, contexts of production and use, and the theories of material life, expression, and culture through which these topics are studied. (Not offered 2013-2014) Cross-listed with [ANTH 530 ]

  
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    AMST 523 - The Museum in the United States


    Spring 3 Staff.

    This seminar will study specific museums while focusing on basic questions having to do with the social forces that gave rise to museums and the roles museums have played and continue to play in U.S. society.  (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 529 - Exploring the African Diaspora Past


    Fall 3 Staff.

    A study of the commonalities and differences across the Diaspora. Works in Anthropology, History, and literature will be used to explore diverse ways of understanding and writing about the social-cultural complexities of the world’s largest forced migration.  (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 534 - Ethnographic History


    Spring 3 Staff.

    Critical readings of recent works by anthropologists and historians, with an emphasis on cross-disciplinary theory and method.  (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 545 - The Making of a Region: Southern Literature and Culture


    Fall 3 Donaldson.

    The U.S. South has long functioned as a repository of national anxieties, failings, and backwardness, the “exception” to the American narrative of freedom, success, and progress by virtue of its defining features of slavery, segregation, economic exploitation, and endemic violence. This course will focus on the role of the region as the nation’s imaginative borderlands in the aftermath of the Civil War and emancipation, when definitions of regional and national identity were undergoing radical realignment along with reformulations of family, community, race, and racialization. Making use of narratives, nonfiction, film, history, and visual representations, we’ll examine the highly contested arena of Reconstruction, the rise of Jim Crow, contending narratives over memory and ownership of the past, visual and verbal critiques of segregation, Civil Rights battles, and postmodern reclamations and reconstructions of a region that continues to struggle with its long legacy of cultural abjection and marginalization.  (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 566 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring variable 3-4 credits Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirments.

  
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    AMST 570 - Topics in American Studies


    Note: If there is no duplication of topic, may be repeated for credit.

    Topics for Fall 2013


    The Museum in America. (3) Braddock.
    This seminar explores the American museum in its multiple overlapping guises – collection, institution, representation, spectacle, nexus, space, edifice, pawn – since around 1800, with emphasis on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The course will not provide utilitarian instruction in museum administration, management, or connoisseurship. Instead, it will approach the museum critically as a site where history, theory, and geopolitics have been imagined, constructed, and contested.
     

    Race: History & Methodology (3) Rosen.
    This seminar explores historical and theoretical approaches to analyzing race, focusing on scholarship on slavery, emancipation, segregation, and immigration in the US.
     

    Sexuality in America. (3) Meyer.
    The course will introduce students to the study of American culture through history, popular culture, multiple media, and scientific literature concerned with sexualities in America. The course will also show how normative sexualities are articulated distinctly depending on race, class, ethnicity, immigrant status, and other factors related to specific American communities.
     

  
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    AMST 581 - Collecting and Exhibiting Culture


    Spring 3 Staff.

    This course will examine the history of field collecting in different parts of the world, questions of cultural ownership, theories of acquisition and preservation used by museums and private collectors, and issues in the exhibiting of both objects and people. Readings will draw mainly on material from the Americas, Africa, and Europe.  (Not offered 2013-2014) Cross-listed with [ANTH 484]

  
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    AMST 582 - Arts of the African Diaspora


    Fall 3 Staff.

    An exploration of artistic creativity in the African diaspora-song, dance, folktales, painting, ceramics, architecture, textile arts, woodcarving, and other media. Consideration of tradition and art history, the articulation of aesthetic ideas, cross-fertilization among different forms and media, the role of gender, the uses of art in social life, kinds of meaning, the nature of artistic creativity, and continuities with artistic ideas and form in African societies. Readings will draw on materials from Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean.  (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 583 - The Material Culture of Early America: Artifacts as Design and as Commodities


    Spring 3 Staff.

    As groundwork for the interpretation of objects in museum exhibits, historic house museums, and a variety of scholarly studies, this course introduces techniques for visual analysis of artifacts and ideas about relationships between design, technology, production, and marketing of consumer goods. Students explore various theoretical approaches to the analysis of material culture, develop critical bibliographical skills, and learn to phrase questions (artistic, technological, economic, functional, social, and cultural) about objects. They explore a wide range of sources that may illuminate the questions, and they develop designs for research projects that may answer them.  (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 584 - The Material Culture of America: Focus on Decorative Arts


    Spring 3 Staff.

    How do we describe the objects with which Americans have furnished their domestic and public buildings? What do they tell us about how American lived and what they thought about themselves, others, and their various worlds? From the time of the earliest seventeenth-century settlements until the present day, the decorative arts in America have both been closely tied to European heritage and to the colonies and nation. This course concentrates on artifacts made or used in America and explores issues of design, production, and distribution in relation to the changing American experience.  (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 590 - Writing and Reading Culture


    Spring 3 Staff.

    Trends in Ethnography (and Ethnographic History), during the past two decades. Students will begin with a classic monograph go on to read about the crisis in representation as depicted in Clifford and Marcus, and then devote themselves to a critical analysis of a range of more recent work.   (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 602 - American Culture Through the Lenses of the Social Sciences


    Fall 3 Staff.

    This seminar introduces students to seminal social theories of social organization, individual and society, cultures, stratification, and social change. Emphasis will be on interdisciplinary theory-building in the social sciences.  (Not offered 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 603 - Problems in Literature and Society


    Fall 3 Staff.

    This semester’s topic will be “The Cultures of Intimacy.” The seminar will explore intimate relations as a dynamic source of social and cultural reproduction and resistance in the late 19th and early 20th century US, particularly as it was manifested in discourses of family life, social obligation, and subjectivity. Emphasis will be on close interpretive engagement with culturally complex materials. (Not offered in 2013-2014)

  
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    AMST 605 - Practicum in American Visual and Material Culture


    Fall or Spring 3 Staff.

    The practicum requires permission of both the instructor and specialist host prior to enrollment. It combines an individual learning experience in one area of hands-on or curatorial study with related directed readings. Students should propose a practicum at least one semester in advance of projected enrollment. In some cases the practicum can be combined with an assistantship assignment at a cultural institution. Ideally the chosen topic should relate to the student’s long-term professional plans. During the course of the semester students develop a research or bibliographic essay on their specialty.

  
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    AMST 661 - Introduction to American Studies


    Fall (3) Thompson.

    This course is required of all entering graduate students in American Studies. In this reading- and writing-intensive seminar, students encounter both current and classic works of the field. They will acquaint themselves with a wide array of interdisciplinary approaches, focusing on both critical theory and practical application in research. MA-only students will produce the first iterations of the Master’s thesis, MA/Ph.D students will acquire Interdisciplinary research skills for use in their two thesis papers, while Ph.D. students will produce the first outline of their comprehensive fields or alternatively, a dissertation topic. The course provides training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research, including discussions of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. May be repeated for credit with permission from Instructor and Grad Director.

  
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    AMST 671 - American Studies: Profession and Practice


    Spring 1 Staff.

    This course investigates both practical and theoretical issues relevant for American Studies in and outside the academy. The class offers students strategic approaches to areas critical for successful careers, areas such as planning long term research, writing grant applications, conference planning, and honing classroom teaching skills. As well, we explore pertinent issues that influence American Studies today: the university system, public culture, and professionalism. The course features the regular participation of guests from American Studies and outside the program. The course is open only to American Studies graduate students, preferably nearing their comprehensive exams.

  
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    AMST 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring (variable 0-2) Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course may be repeated.

  
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    AMST 690 - Directed Research


    Fall and Spring 3 Various Faculty

    A program of extensive reading, writing and discussion in a special area of American Studies for the advanced student. Students accepted for this course will arrange their program of study with an appropriate faculty advisor. Permission of the program chair is required. This course may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.

  
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    AMST 695 - Directed Thesis Master’s Research


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-9) Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.    This course may be repeated, but no more than 9 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for submitting a master’s thesis.

  
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    AMST 700 - Thesis


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Graded Pass/Fail Note: Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a master’s thesis.

  
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    AMST 715 - Topics in American Studies


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff Prerequisite(s): Open only to candidates for advanced degrees. Note: Topics change each semester; see open course list.

    These seminars explore specific areas, themes, or critical issues in American Studies. This course may be repeated for credit when topic differs.

  
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    AMST 766 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring (1-12) Staff Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements. This course may be repeated.

  
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    AMST 790 - Directed Research


    Fall and Spring 3, 3 Various Faculty. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the program chair is required.

    A program of extensive reading, writing and discussion in a special area of American Studies for the advanced student. Students accepted for this course will arrange their program of study with an appropriate faculty advisor. This course may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.

  
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    AMST 795 - Directed Dissertation Research


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 12 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.

  
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    AMST 800 - Dissertation


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.


Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 525 - Applied Anthropology


    Spring 3 Hamada Connolly

    This seminar introduces basic applied anthropology perspectives and methodology for community research. It combines classroom discussion, empirical fieldwork, data analysis, and ethnographic writing. Topics include statistical analysis, collaborative research, professional ethics, behavioral observation techniques, interview and survey techniques, report writing, digital representation, policy application, and grant-writing. It introduces quantitative/qualitative research design, data collection, analysis and interpretation used in applied anthropology.

  
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    ANTH 526 - Foodways and the Archaeological Record


    Spring 3 Bowen.

    A multidisciplinary perspective on how societies procure food. Drawing upon archaeological, historical, and anthropological studies, students will learn about provisioning systems found in foraging, horticultural, agrarian, and industrialized societies. Emphasis will be placed on Great Britain and North America.

  
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    ANTH 527 - Native People of Eastern North America


    Spring 3 Bragdon.

    This course treats the native people of eastern North America as they have been viewed ethnographically, theoretically and historically. Students will apply anthropological theory to historical and contemporary issues regarding native people of the eastern United States, and develop critical skills through reading, research and writing about these people.

  
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    ANTH 529 - Exploring the Afro-American Past


    Fall or Spring 3 Gundaker, Norman.

    A study of the commonalities and differences across Afro-America from the U.S. to Brazil. Works in anthropology, history, and literature will be used to explore the nature of historical consciousness within the African Diaspora and diverse ways of understanding the writing about Afro-American pasts.

  
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    ANTH 530 - Material Life in African America


    Fall 3 Gundaker.

    This seminar explores the world of things that African Americans have made and made their own in what is now the United States from the colonial era through the present. Topics include landscapes of enslavement and freedom, labor practices, architecture, foodways, objects, aesthetics, contexts of production and use, and the theories of material life, expression, and culture through which these topics are studied. Cross-listed with [AMST 518 ]

  
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    ANTH 532 - Maroon Societies


    Fall or Spring 3 Gundaker.

    An exploration of the African American communities created by escaped slaves throughout the Americas, from Brazil up through the Caribbean and into the southern United States. Emphasis on the processes by which enslaved Africans from diverse societies created new cultures in the Americas, on the development of these societies through time, and on the present-day status of surviving maroon communities in Suriname and French Guiana, Jamaica, Colombia and elsewhere.

  
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    ANTH 545 - Issues in Anthropology


    Fall and Spring 1/3/2(0)13 Staff.

    Students will conduct research in anthropology focused on selected issues and problems such as inequality and justice, the environment, ethnic relations and minorities, war and peace, population, and social changes. This course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

  
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    ANTH 550 - Archaeological Conservation (I)


    Fall 3 Moyer.

    An introduction to the theory and practice of archaeological conservation, including systems of deterioration, treatment, and storage. The first semester emphasizes the material science and technological underpinnings of archaeological artifacts.

  
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    ANTH 551 - Archaeological Conservation (II)


    Spring 3 Moyer.

    In the second semester, students receive instruction and experience in the laboratory treatment of artifacts from 17th to 19th century archaeological sites in North America and the West Indies.

  
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    ANTH 553 - Zooarchaeology


    Spring 4 Bowen.

    An introduction to the identification and interpretation of animal bones recovered from archaeological sites.

  
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    ANTH 554 - Quantitative Research Methods in Anthropology


    Fall 3 Gallivan.

    Introduction to the design and implementation of quantitative research in anthropology. Statistical methods covered include those used in describing and interpreting archaeological , biological, ethnographic and linguistic data. The course focuses on exploratory data analysis, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression.

  
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    ANTH 555 - Practicing Cultural Resource Management


    Spring 3 Staff.

    This course introduces students to the practice of cultural resource management (contract archaeology), including hands-on experience in planning, proposal preparation, field and laboratory strategies, project management, and the reporting process.

  
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    ANTH 556 - Human Skeletal Biology


    Fall or Spring 3 Blakey.

    This course covers technical aspects of human identification involving skeletal remains. These techniques include bone and tooth identification, age and sex estimation, and methods for the assessment of nutrition and disease in archaeological populations.

  
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    ANTH 557 - The Archaeology of Colonial Williamsburg and Tidewater Virginia


    Spring 3 Brown.

    This course examines the archaeological research on sites located in and around Williamsburg, the capital of the colony of Virginia from 1699-1781. The course explores the contributions that archaeological research has made to understanding the development of Jamestown and Williamsburg, in relation to a regional, plantation-based economy and society. Consideration is also given to larger issues surrounding the relative position of Williamsburg and its hinterland within the Atlantic World. Specific comparisons will be made with the development of other English colonies such as Bermuda and Barbados.

  
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    ANTH 558 - Caribbean Archaeology


    Fall 3 Smith.

    The archaeology of western Atlantic islands for the period 1492-1900 AD. The pre- Columbian background, contact between indigenous and European groups, European settlement and island development will be examined through recent archaeological work on urban settlements, military forts, commercial structures, sugar mills and others.

  
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    ANTH 559 - Tsenacomoco: Native Archaeology of the Chesapeake


    Spring 3 Gallivan.

    This class explores the “deep history” of Native Chesapeake societies by tracing a 15,000- year sequence resulting in the Algonquian social landscape of “Tsenacomoco”. The class considers Pleistocene-era settlement, hunter-forager cultural ecology, Woodland-period migration, agricultural adoption, chiefdom emergence, Native responses to colonialism, and contemporary uses of the Native past.

  
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    ANTH 566 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring variable 3-4 credits Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirments. This course may be repeated.

  
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    ANTH 572 - Ethnographic History


    Fall or Spring 3 Bragdon, Glasser, Gallivan.

    Critical readings of recent works by anthropologists and historians, with an emphasis on cross-disciplinary theory and method.

  
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    ANTH 584 - Collecting and Exhibiting Culture


    Fall or Spring 3 Moretti-Langholtz, Norman.

    The process of assembling material artifacts across cultural boundaries. The course will examine the history of field collecting in different parts of the world, questions of cultural ownership, theories of acquisition and preservation used by museums and private collectors, and issues in the exhibiting of both objects and people. Readings will draw mainly on material from Canada, the U.S., Mesoamerica, the Caribbean, Africa, and Europe.

  
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    ANTH 586 - Cultural Politics of Art


    Fall or Spring 3 Gundaker.

    Exploration of the cultural and political world of art as experienced by artists, museum visitors, gallery owners, teachers, collectors, curators, critics, and charlatans. Class discussions will consider anthropological and art historical perspectives in addressing questions central to both disciplines.

  
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    ANTH 590 - Writing and Reading Culture


    Fall or Spring 3 Staff.

    Trends in ethnography (and ethnographic history), during the past two decades. Students will begin with a ‘classic monograph,’ go on to read about the ‘crisis’ in representation as depicted by Clifford and Marcus, and then devote themselves to a critical analysis of a range of more recent work.

  
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    ANTH 592 - Biocultural Anthropology


    Spring 3 Blakey.

    Recent advances in the study of interactions between human biology and culture are examined. Biocultural anthropology extends beyond the limitations of evolutionary theory, employing political and economic perspectives on variation in the physiology and health of human populations.

  
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    ANTH 600 - Socio-Cultural Theory


    Fall (3) Staff.

    The course will discuss major concepts, theories and findings in cultural and social Anthropology. Students will be introduced to the history of thought within the discipline from 19th-century evolutionism to postmodernism. This course includes training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research, as well as discussion of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism.

  
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    ANTH 602 - Biological Anthropology


    Spring 3 Staff.

    Anatomy and behavior of nonhuman primates, fossil hominids, and modern human populations are analyzed via theories and methods in biological anthropology. Emphasis is given to construction of models for understanding the evolution of human behavior, focusing on bipedalism, technology, and language.

  
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    ANTH 603 - Archaeological Theory


    Spring (3) Gallivan.

    An examination of the major concepts and methodological approaches in prehistoric archaeology as background for the understanding of historical archaeology.

  
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    ANTH 604 - Archaeological Method


    Spring 3 Staff.

    A general introduction to field and laboratory techniques of prehistoric and historical archaeological research.

  
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    ANTH 605 - Anthropological Linguistics


    Spring 3 Bragdon.

    This course will examine the history and theories of linguistic anthropology. Focus will be on the ways in which linguistics has influenced the development of anthropological theories concerning cognition and practice.

  
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    ANTH 606 - Documentary Anthropology


    Fall 3 Bragdon.

    Introduction to methods and theories of text analysis for archaeological and anthropological research. Structural, symbolic and cognitive models of culture are presented. Emphasis is on the integration of these models, the use and evaluation of documents by historical archaeologists, and research with primary historical data.

  
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    ANTH 607 - Bioarchaeology and the African Diaspora


    Spring 3 Blakey.

    This course is a graduate seminar on the use of paleopathological and paleodemographic data derived from human skeletons uncovered at archaeological sites. The historic archaeological sites of the African Diaspora in the Americas provide the comparative examples of the course.

  
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    ANTH 610 - Artifacts


    Spring 3 Smith.

    An examination of Euro-American ceramics, glassware, tobacco pipes and other portable artifacts of the period c.1600-1900 A.D. Students will learn how to date, identify, and analyze classes of objects from historic archaeological contexts, as well as how to obtain information pertaining to technology, function, and social and economic status.

  
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    ANTH 611 - Historical Archaeology


    Spring 3 Brown, Smith.

    An historical review of the method and theory of American historical archaeology, with emphasis upon specific research strategies and accomplishments in relation to the broader study of American material culture. The role of historical archaeology within historic preservation, cultural resource management, and historic museums will also be considered.

  
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    ANTH 612 - American Material Culture


    Fall 3 Staff.

    This course examines American life and culture, past and present, through its material artifacts. It focuses on the historical development and behavioral aspects of American material culture as revealed by archaeological and documentary research. The relationship of material culture including vernacular architecture, ceramics, glass, mortuary art, and other household and industrial artifacts, and various social dimensions, such as social class, gender and ethnicity, will be explored.

  
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    ANTH 613 - Historical Archaeology of the American South


    Spring 3 Staff.

    The course tests the notion of Southern uniqueness and Southern identity against an array of archaeological evidence dating from the earliest colonial settlements through to the archaeology of the Depression era.

  
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    ANTH 615 - North American Prehistory


    Spring 3 Gallivan.

    A seminar on the prehistory of North America north of Mexico. Topics covered are: the peopling of North America, the cultural development of indigenous peoples, the archaeology of Native Americans, and the cultural processes that attempt to explain North American culture history.

  
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    ANTH 617 - Special Topics in Anthropology


    Fall and Spring (1-4) Staff.

  
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    ANTH 625 - Field Work in Archaeology


    Summer 6 Brown, Gallivan.

    The application of archaeological methods to an individual field project within the framework of a supervised archaeological field program.

  
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    ANTH 630 - Writing and Publishing in Anthropology


    Fall or Spring 3 Staff.

    A practical introduction to the whole range of writing and publishing activities engaged in by anthropologists, this course will cover techniques, conventions, and practices regarding grant proposals, book reviews, CVs, articles, abstracts, books, research reports, and job applications. We will consider submission procedures, the editing process, design considerations, distribution and marketing, legal issues, and ethical questions. The intent will be to demystify an aspect of the life of professional anthropologists that students are often left to discover on their own. In addition to substantial readings, there will be a writing assignment every week.

  
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    ANTH 640 - Presentation and Paper


    Spring (3) Staff.

    This seminar prepares students for the Presentation and Paper requirement through a program that includes reading examples of anthropological scholarship, developing and revising an article-length paper, and publically presenting a scholarly argument. All students in the M.A./Ph.D. and Ph.D. tracks will complete the Presentation and Paper process during their fourth semester by writing a paper that engages questions of anthropological significance and by presenting the paper to the department by the end of the academic year.

  
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    ANTH 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring variable 0-2 Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course may be repeated.

  
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    ANTH 690 - Directed Research


    Fall and Spring (3) Staff.

    A program of extensive reading, writing and discussion in a special area of Anthropology for students entering the M.A./Ph.D. program without a previous graduate degree. Students accepted for this course will arrange their program of study with an appropriate faculty advisor.

  
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    ANTH 695 - Directed Thesis Master’s Research


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-9) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.    This course may be repeated, but no more than 9 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for submitting a master’s thesis.

  
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    ANTH 700 - Thesis


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.  Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a master’s thesis.

  
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    ANTH 701 - Issues in Historical Anthropology


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff.

    An examination of selected topics in cultural anthropology. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
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    ANTH 702 - Issues in Historical Archaeology


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff.

    An examination of selected topics in historical archaeology. This course may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of material.

  
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    ANTH 766 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring (1-12) Staff Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements.  This course may be repeated.

  
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    ANTH 790 - Independent Study


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff.

    A program of extensive reading, writing and discussion in a special area of historical anthropology or historical archaeology for the Ph.D. student. Students accepted for this course will arrange their program of study with an appropriate faculty advisor. This course may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of material.

  
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    ANTH 795 - Directed Dissertation Research


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail Note: Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 12 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.

  
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    ANTH 800 - Dissertation


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.  Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.


Applied Science

  
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    APSC 566 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring variable 3-4 credits Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirments. This course may be repeated.

  
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    APSC 603 - Introduction to Scientific Research I


    Fall (2) Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

    This course sequence, designed for the first year graduate student, acquaints them with the range and scope of research opportunities in Applied Science and the skills and knowledge necessary to function as a professional researcher. Provides training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research, including discussions of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism.

  
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    APSC 604 - Introduction to Scientific Research II


    Spring (2) Prerequisite(s): APSC 603  and consent of instructor.

    Continuation of APSC 603 .

  
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    APSC 607 - Mathematical and Computational Methods I


    Fall (4)

    This course is a survey of important mathematical principles and techniques used to solve problems encountered in a variety of scientific disciplines and industrial applications. These disciplines and applications include chemistry, physics, and materials science. Computation is a major aspect of the course and will occupy a substantial portion of the curriculum. Computational instruction will include both analytical and numerical techniques and will make use of symbolic and numerical software packages.

  
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    APSC 608 - Mathematical and Computational Methods II


    Spring (4) Prerequisite(s): APSC 607  or consent of instructor.

    Continuation of APSC 607 .

  
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    APSC 621 - Applied Solid State Science


    Fall (4)

    Students learn advanced concepts for bonding, macromolecular ordering, and structure-property relationships in materials. The course begins with macromolecular bonding as it relates to material dipoles, crystallographic ordering, and surfaces/interfaces. The second unit focuses on processing and morphology involving metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, adhesives, plasticizes, and solvents. The final portion of the course considers material interactions (with other materials or with electromagnetic radiation). Feynman’s Coupled States approach is invoked for determining energies of electronic states arising in solid materials. Reduction/oxidation potentials, acidity/basicity, corrosion, adsorption, adhesion, electronic mobility/polarizability, and optical phenomenon are discussed in the context of the perturbation or interaction of electronic states.

  
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    APSC 622 - Quantitative Materials Characterization


    Fall (4)

    This course presents a wide variety of means by which the properties and characteristics of materials can be experimentally determined. These include electrical, optical, acoustic, thermal, spectroscopic, and resonance methods. The objective is to discuss these separate means under the umbrella of fundamentals of interactions of matter with particles and waves. The course will address issues of data acquisition, such as sampling, discretization, and signal processing. Applications of these techniques to research in materials development, synthesis, processing, and in situ manufacturing. Cross-listed with CHEM 622  

  
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    APSC 623 - Materials Science of Surfaces and Interfaces


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.

    Fundamental and applied aspects of metal, inorganic, polymer and other organic surfaces. Solid/solid, solid/liquid and solid/vapor interfaces. Their structure and defects, thermodynamics, reactivity, electronic and mechanical properties. Applications depend on class interests, but have previously included microelectronics, soils, catalysis, colloids, composites, environment sensitive mechanical behavior, UHV single crystal studies, materials durability, batteries and fuel cells, vacuum science and technology, and surface bioactivity. Cross-listed with CHEM 623

  
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    APSC 627 - Lasers in Medicine, Science, and Technology


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): PHYS 101/102 or PHYS 107/108.

    A basis for understanding and use of lasers and modern optics in medicine, science, and technology. Particularly interaction of laser beams with biological materials and tissue, refractive surgery, spectroscopic applications including Raman and fluorescence imaging, laser remote sensing, and laser safety.

  
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    APSC 631 - Applied Cellular Neuroscience


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.

    We examine cellular neurophysiology including topics such as: membrane potentials, ion channels and permeability, electrical signaling and cable properties, synaptic transmission, and neuromodulation. We apply these concepts to motor control, homeostatic regulation, and special senses.

  
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    APSC 632 - Applied Systems Neuroscience


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): APSC 631  or consent of instructor.

    We explore how behaviors emerge through multiple levels of organization in the nervous system. Topics include: cranial and spinal reflexes, central pattern generator networks, the neural control of breathing, the neural control of appetite, body weight, and obesity, and finally, the neuropharmacology of nicotine addiction.

  
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    APSC 637 - Introduction to Optoelectronics


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): PHYS 621 , PHYS 741 , and APSC 627  are recommended.

    This course is a comprehensive introduction to waveguide optics and photonics in semi-conductor structures, and provides the basic knowledge for understanding the concepts of optoelectronic devices for transmission and processing of optical signals. These optical communications engineering devices are becoming increasingly important for optical disk storage systems, optical chip-chip interconnections and optical fiber transmission and exchange.

  
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    APSC 640 - Membrane Proteins: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Research


    Fall (3) Cotten Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor Note: CHEM 415 (Advanced Biochemistry) or the equivalent is highly recommended.

    Biological membranes and their constituents are involved in virtually all processes vital to living organisms, including nutrient uptake, information transfer between the inside and outside of the cell, and the mediation of vital activities such as nerve impulse propagation and hormone signaling. It is therefore not surprising that our modern view of biological cells is profoundly related to the descriptions of their membranes and that membrane-associated receptors, enzymes, and ion channels are prime drug targets. This multi-disciplinary course will cover the interplay between the three-dimensional structures, dynamics, and functions of membrane proteins and lipids, the technical approaches used to characterize their functions and active sites under physiologically-relevant conditions, and the therapeutic potential of targeting membrane proteins to treat a broad range of illnesses, such as neurological disorders, infectious diseases, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

     

     

  
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    APSC 647 - Correlated Electron Systems


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): PHYS 621 , and PHYS 741  are recommended.

    This course is concerned with the microscopic aspects of magnetic and superconducting states encountered in nature, their properties, and possible technological applications. The following topics will be discussed: Itinerant Electron Magnetism, Spin Waves, BCS Theory of Superconductors, Vortices in Type II Superconductors, Josephson Effect, and Quantum Interferometers. The course can be understood with minimal prerequisites and the mathematical techniques used are fairly elementary. However a basic knowledge of spin and angular momentum is essential, since quantum mechanics lies at the heart of both magnetism and superconductivity.

  
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    APSC 651 - Cellular Biophysics and Modeling


    Fall (3)

    This course is an introduction to simulation and modeling of dynamic phenomena in cell biology and neuroscience. Topics covered include membrane transport and diffusion, the biophysics of excitable membranes, the gating of voltage and ligandgated ion channels, intracellular calcium signaling, and electrical bursting in neurons and other cell types.

  
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    APSC 653 - Cellular Signaling in MATLAB


    Spring (3)

    An introduction to computer modeling of cell signal transduction, that is, how cells convert external stimuli such as hormones and neurotransmitters into an integrated and coordinated intracellular response. Topics covered include: binding of ligand to receptors, ion channels and electrical signals, metabotropic signaling (G protein coupled receptors, effector molecules, second messengers), intracellular calcium dynamics, and sensory transduction in the visual and auditory systems. Each topic will be introduced from the biological perspective and studied by simulation using MATLAB. Prior experience with mathematical and computer modeling is not required.

  
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    APSC 654 - Bioinformatics and Molecular Evolution


    Spring (3)

    An introduction to computational molecular biology and molecular evolution including nucleotide and amino acid sequence comparison, DNA fragment assembly, phylogenetic tree construction and inference, RNA and protein secondary structure prediction and substitution models of sequence evolution. Cross-listed with [BIOL 454]

  
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    APSC 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring variable 0-2 Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course may be repeated.

  
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    APSC 690 - Readings in Applied Science


    Fall, Spring Hours and credits to be arranged.

    Subject and text to be selected by the instructor and the students. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
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    APSC 691 - Topics in Applied Science


    Fall, Spring Hours and credits to be arranged.

    Subject and text to be selected by the instructor and the students.

  
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    APSC 694 - Directed Research Topics


    Fall and Spring (variable 1-12)

    Students design and conduct research on a relevant topic with a faculty advisor.   Students who are submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. course may be repeated, but no more than 12 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements.

  
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    APSC 695 - Directed Thesis Master’s Research


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-9) Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.


    Students design and conduct research in support of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.    This course may be repeated, but no more than 9 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for submitting a master’s thesis.

  
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    APSC 700 - Thesis


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.  Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a master’s thesis.

  
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    APSC 701 - Fundamentals of Data Acquisition and Signal Processing


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): MATH 211, 212, and 302.

    Data acquisition of signals; sampling and discretization; the sampling theorem; undersampling and aliasing; convolution; correlation; frequent domain representation and analysis; discrete Fourier transform and FFT spectrum and filters; power spectrum estimation; z-transform and time-representation and analysis; wave shaping.

 

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