Nov 30, 2020  
2012 - 2013 Graduate Catalog 
    
2012 - 2013 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

LAW 317 - Law & Neuroscience


This course examines a variety of cutting-edge, at times controversial, linkages between law and neuroscience, ranging from social and environmental influences on the brain and behavior to the interpretations of neuroimaging and the prediction of criminality and predispositions towards mental illnesses and addictions. Students will learn how discoveries in neuroscience intersect with societal responses and legal decision-making. Scientists are increasingly using new techniques to investigate the brain activity underlying cognitive phenomena. The course will explore whether, and if so how, the law should engage with various emerging neuroscientific findings, technologies, and perspectives on such topics as evidentiary rules, memory bias and enhancement, lie and deception detection, the neurobiology of criminal culpability and punishment, emotions and decision making, addiction, adolescent brains and juvenile law, moral and legal reasoning, tort law, artificial intelligence, and the like. The course will also address a variety of challenging questions raised by the increasing introduction of brain scans as evidence in courtroom proceedings. A background in science may be helpful, but is not required, as the course will provide a “brain basics” introduction for law students.