May 07, 2021  
2012 - 2013 Graduate Catalog 
    
2012 - 2013 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

School Psychology & Counselor Education (SPACE)


Programs

Counseling

School Psychology


Counseling

The M.Ed. Program in Counseling is organized into a series of required educational and research foundation courses, basic counseling courses, and specialized courses that enable a student to concentrate in Community Counseling, Community & Addictions Counseling, School Counseling or Family Counseling.

Culminating Experience

 The various internship experiences constitute the culminating experience activities for all master’s degree programs in Counseling.

The Exit Interview

Students in all emphasis areas of the M.Ed. program in Counseling must arrange an exit interview during the last semester of their program of study. The interview is conducted by the faculty of the Counseling program to obtain evaluative feedback about a student’s experiences in the program. 

Licensure as a Professional Counselor in Virginia (LPC)

At this time in Virginia, licensure as a Professional Counselor requires a master’s degree in counseling, 60 hours of graduate course work in counseling, a 4000-hour, post-master’s clinical residency, and successful completion of the licensure examination. The program of studies for all of the M.Ed. degrees in Counseling at the College of William & Mary includes all the required areas of classroom and clinical instruction needed for licensure as a Professional Counselor in Virginia and most other states. The entire 60 hours need not be taken duringthe M.Ed. program. Students in programs requiring less than 60 hours for graduation may elect to complete the 60 hours required for Virginia licensure before or after they graduate.

Licensure as a Substance Abuse Treatment Practitioner in Virginia (LSATP)

The program of studies for the Community & Addictions Counseling program also meets the coursework and clinical instruction requirements for licensure in Virginia as a Substance Abuse Treatment Practitioner.

Licensure as a Marriage & Family Therapist in Virginia

The program of studies for the Family Counseling program also meets the coursework and clinical instruction requirements for licensure in Virginia as a Marriage & Family Therapist and most other states.

For more information about licensing requirements by the state of Virginia, please visit their website at: Virginia Board of Counseling: http://www.dhp.virginia.gov/counseling/.

The Counseling Clinic

The Counseling Program features a teaching clinic offering state-of-the-art clinical training for students and providing two vital services to the William & Mary and surrounding communities.

New Horizons Family Counseling Center

The New Horizons Family Counseling Center is the product of the collaborative efforts of New Horizons Regional Educational Center and the School of Education at The College of William & Mary. The Center provides free services to families of children attending public schools in the region. It is an active and award-winning family counseling center that provides a much-needed clinical resource to the community and focuses on counseling methods that promote healthy families and school achievement for children. New Horizons is the internship site for master’s students in the Family Counseling Program, and also for doctoral students engaged in a cognate or clinical track in family counseling. Family counseling services are provided at sites both on the campus of William & Mary and in select public schools. Under licensed faculty supervision, students serve as family counselors for the Center where they develop and practice family counseling skills with diverse clients. Students also hold administrative and leadership roles on the Center, and participate in research projects and grants. For more information about the New Horizons Family Counseling Center, go to http://education.wm.edu/centers/newhorizons/aboutus/index.php or contact Dr. Victoria Foster at vafost@wm.edu.

New Leaf Clinic

The New Leaf Clinic provides brief counseling (6-10 sessions), to students at William & Mary with issues related to the use of alcohol or other drugs. Counselors at the New Leaf assess students’ behaviors and attitudes relating to alcohol and other drugs with research-validated instruments and conduct interventions using Motivational Interviewing techniques. Motivational Interviewing is a “cutting edge,” evidence-based intervention program that has proved effective for motivating change in substance use. It emphasizes clients’ choice. Counseling is provided by doctoral students or by masters’ students who are Counseling interns in the Community & Addictions Counseling track of the School of Education, under the supervision of a faculty and/or doctoral counseling student. For more information about the New Leaf Clinic, please contact Dr. Rick Gressard at (757) 221-2352 or cfgres@wm.edu.

School Psychology

The school psychology program incorporates a developmental course of study that ensures students’ learning is appropriately sequenced and coordinated with relevant practical experiences. The school psychology program curriculum has been structured with three major emphases: (1) psychological and educational foundations; (2) clinical training in assessment linked to intervention, consultation & collaboration, and prevention & intervention; and (3) effective application of skills in school settings.

Doctoral Comprehensive Examinations- SPACE

The purpose of the comprehensive examination process is threefold. The first emphasis is placed on the use of the comprehensive exam for the student to demonstrate the ability to produce an independent integration and synthesis across the graduate course work and topic areas in the program of study. The second emphasis is to assess the student’s ability to interrelate theory, research and practice in the program of study. Third, the comprehensive exam is an opportunity to assess the readiness of the student to continue the doctoral program to completion, with an emphasis on appropriate knowledge, scholarly writing and organizational skills.

Program Requirements

Formal written and oral comprehensive exams are required for admission to doctoral candidacy. The Office of Academic Programs schedules the comprehensive examination.

Eligibility

A student is considered eligible to take the doctoral comprehensive during or immediately following the final semester of required course work, or within six hours of completion of the courses listed on the plan of study, excluding dissertation hours. Completion of EDUC 663 , EDUC 664  and EDUC 665  is recommended prior to the semester in which the comprehensive examination is taken.

Comprehensive Examination Format

The Comprehensive Examination consists of the Standard Written Examination, the Candidacy Paper, and the Oral Examination based primarily upon the Candidacy Paper.

Step One: The Standard Examination

The Doctoral Program faculty in School Psychology and Counselor Education design essay questions representing areas of study that are central to doctoral study in the field. The questions require a demonstration of breadth of knowledge and call for description and analysis of central issues in the primary field of study and supporting fields or cognate areas as deemed appropriate by the Area faculty. The exam is to be completed in 10 hours and includes one question regarding research design.

Exam Evaluation

Each Doctoral Program Area is responsible for developing written criteria for the evaluation of the standard exam. These written criteria must be shared with students prior to the exam. The Committee will evaluate the standard exam on a Pass/Fail/Honors basis. A unanimous vote is required for an Honors designation; a majority vote is necessary for all other evaluations. The review of the standard exam should be completed within two weeks. Each member of the Committee will summarize his or her evaluation in a memo to the Chair. The Chair of the Committee will notify the Office of Academic Programs regarding the status of the student; subsequently, the Office of Academic Programs will notify the student. In the event of an unsatisfactory evaluation of the standard exam, the Chair will make recommendations and set a timetable to remedy any deficiencies. A second standard exam may be scheduled through the Office of Academic Programs. If a failing grade is received twice, the candidacy is denied.

Step Two: The Candidacy Paper

The Candidacy Paper serves as the focus for the Oral Examination. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate an in-depth critical analysis coupled with appropriate or original interpretations and applications of the topic under consideration. The student must submit an outline for the paper to the Chair within two weeks of receiving an evaluation of Pass or Honors for the Standard Written Exam. Within two weeks following submission, the Committee must accept the topical outline or may request a revised submission by the student. Upon approval, the Committee Chair will file the appropriate form with the Office of Academic Programs. Students must certify in an Honor Code statement that the paper is a substantially new product which may draw upon previous work, but represents fresh perspectives. The paper will be between twenty and twenty-five narrative pages in a topic area highly relevant to the primary field of study and follow standard APA style requirements. The paper must be completed within four weeks. During this period, faculty contact is limited to brief consultation on the process but not the substance of the paper. Ideally, the paper will be of publishable quality.

Paper Evaluation

Each Doctoral Program Area is responsible for developing written criteria for the evaluation of the paper. The student should demonstrate in the paper the content knowledge and critical analysis and writing skills necessary for the completion of the dissertation. Upon a satisfactory evaluation of the paper from the majority of the Committee members, the Chair of the Committee will notify the student and the Office of Academic Programs, and set the date for the oral exam. In the event of an unsatisfactory evaluation of the paper, the Chair will make recommendations and set a timetable to remedy any deficiencies. A second evaluation will be scheduled by the Chair. A student may rewrite an unsatisfactory paper only once. A second unsatisfactory paper denies the student candidacy.

Step Three: The Oral Examination

The Oral Examination will be facilitated by the Chair of the Committee, and all members of the Committee must attend. The oral examination focuses on verbal presentation of the content of the Candidacy Paper, as well as any other relevant content areas that are identified by the Committee and submitted to the student.

Oral Examination Evaluation

Each Doctoral Program is responsible for developing both a group orientation to the process of the oral exam as well as a written criteria for the evaluation of this exam. The Committee will meet at the conclusion of the oral exam to determine the status of the student based on his or her performance. The Committee will evaluate the oral exam on a Pass/Fail/Honors basis. A unanimous vote is required for an Honors designation; a majority vote is necessary for all other evaluations. The Chair will notify the student and the Office of Academic Programs of the evaluation that the student has received. In the event of an unsatisfactory evaluation of the oral exam, the Chair will make recommendations and set a timetable to remedy any deficiencies. A second oral exam will be scheduled by the Chair and the student. A student may retake a failed oral exam only once. A second failed oral exam denies the student candidacy.

Honors Designation

In order for a student to receive the Honors designation on his or her transcript for the comprehensive exams, all components (the standard exam, the candidacy paper, and the oral exam) must be judged at the Honors level. The Honors designation will be announced at the time of graduation during the recognition of degrees at the School of Education graduation ceremony.

For more information about the School Psychology or Counselor Education Programs, please send an e-mail message to:

  • Community Counseling Program Dr. Rip McAdams (crmcad@wm.edu)
  • Community & Addictions Counseling Program Dr. Rick Gressard (cfgres@wm.edu)
  • Family Counseling Program Dr. Victoria Foster (vafost@wm.edu)
  • School Counseling Program Dr. Ann Shillingford-Butler (mashillingford@wm.edu) or Dr. Shannon Trice-Black (stblack@wm.edu)
  • School Psychology Program Dr. Lea Theodore (ltheodore@wm.edu)
  • Counselor Education Ph.D. Program Dr. Victoria Foster (vafost@wm.edu)