Mar 02, 2024  
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Explanation of Course Descriptions

Graduate courses may be taken by persons other than regular or provisional graduate students in Arts and Sciences only with the consent of the chairperson of the department/program committee concerned.

Pairs of numbers (501,502) indicate continuous courses. A hyphen between numbers (501-502) indicates that the courses must be taken in the succession stated.

Courses involving laboratory or studio activity are so labeled. All others are classroom courses.

Semester hour credit for each course is indicated by numbers in parentheses.

 

 

Applied Science

  
  • APSC 710 - Research Project


    Fall (2)

    Students will select a faculty advisor in their area of research interest, undertake a research project, and write a paper describing their research. This course is normally taken after a student has completed 18 credit hours toward the MS degree. However, students are advised to begin the process of selecting a research area and an advisor, and to begin meeting with the advisor before completing 18 credits. It is not open to students who receive credit for APSC 700 . Students wishing to register for APSC 710 must submit a short abstract describing their research project to the Graduate Director at least two weeks before the class is scheduled to begin. The faculty member who will direct the research must sign this abstract. Any tenure track faculty may direct a research project. Any student, who is unable to convince any other faculty member to be their APSC 710 advisor, will be assigned to the Applied Science graduate program director. Any student in this situation must still submit a short abstract to the Graduate Director for approval at least two weeks before the semester begins. Completion of the course includes completion of the project, writing a report and receiving approval from the advisor. All requirements must be completed by the last day of classes (not of the exam period) for the student to receive credit in a given semester.

  
  • APSC 722 - Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation I


    Fall (3)

    An overview of techniques and physical principles for determining material properties and detecting and characterizing defects in materials. Ultrasonic and thermographic methods receive special emphasis.

  
  • APSC 723 - Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation II


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): APSC 722 .

    This course is a continuation of APSC 722 , and covers nondestructive evaluation techniques such as acoustic microscopy, optical, eddy current and radiographic NDE.

  
  • APSC 751 - Mathematical Physiology I


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): APSC 651  or consent of instructor.

    Computational and mathematical aspects of electrophysiology and cellular biophysics emphasizing stochastic and spatial modeling applied to cell signal transduction, the dynamics of intracellular calcium, and the visual neurosciences.

  
  
  • APSC 755 - Nonlinear Dynamics


    Fall (3)

    Linear systems of ODEs. Nonlinear systems; dynamical systems, existence/uniqueness of solutions; phase plane analysis; bifurcation; Poincare-Bendixson theory. Applications in biology, circuit theory, and mechanics. Discrete dynamical systems.

  
  • APSC 766 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring (1-12) Staff Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements.  This course may be repeated.

  
  • APSC 772 - Tensor Interaction in Magnetic Resonance


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): APSC 671  or consent of instructor.

    This course is intended for graduate students who have begun Ph.D. thesis work in magnetic resonance. Topics to be covered include: angular momentum theory, spherical representation of tensors, the Wigner-Eckart theorem and matrix elements of tensor operators, operator bases for representing the spin density matrix, and the theory and applications of spin relaxation.

  
  • APSC 776 - Acoustic Wave Propagation in Solids


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): APSC 722 .

    Wave propagation in solids with emphasis on the evaluation of materials and defects. Linear and non-linear wave propagation, mode analysis and mixing, reflection and refraction at interfaces, and wave scattering from defects in isotropic and anisotropic media will be discussed, along with the relationship between wave behavior and the reconstruction of material constitutive equations. The course also will describe the practical aspects of the generation and detection of acoustic waves for non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  
  • APSC 784 - Imaging Methods


    Spring (3) Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.

    Fundamentals and applications of the two complementary families of imaging techniques: optical microscopy and scanning probe methods. Topics covered include geometric and wave optics, optical imaging, basic forms of light–matter interaction, all major optical microscopy modes (including fluorescence and confocal), interfacial forces, atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and near-field optics.

  
  • APSC 785 - Acoustic and EM Scattering


    Fall (3) Prerequisite(s): APSC 723 .

    Acoustic, electromagnetic and elastic wave scattering for materials characterization and remote sensing. Subjects to be covered are: field equations, boundary conditions, Green’s functions; integral representations and integral equations, scattering amplitude and scattering matrices; plane, spherical and cylindrical scalar and vector wave functions; scattering of waves by spheres and cylinders; inverse scattering techniques.

  
  • APSC 790 - Readings in Applied Science


    Fall, Spring Hours and credits to be arranged.

    Subject and text to be selected by the instructor and students.

  
  • APSC 791 - Topics in Applied Science


    Fall, Spring Hours and credits to be arranged.

    Subject and text to be selected by the instructor and students.

  
  • APSC 795 - Directed Dissertation Research


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 12 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.

  
  • APSC 800 - Dissertation


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.   Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.


Biology

  
  • BIOL 501 - Evolutionary Genetics


    Spring 4 Staff. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220 or equivalent.

    The course is designed to consider evolution as a process: Basic population genetic theory; sources of variation; natural selection; isolating mechanisms and speciation. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour.

  
  • BIOL 502 - Microbiology


    Fall 4 Forsyth. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220 or equivalent.

    Homologies are stressed in the study of life using the elementary systems of selected bacteria and other microorganisms. With the ultimate goal of an understanding of current research, the areas covered include classical and modern techniques, biochemistry, sexual and asexual genetics. Two class hours, eight laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 504 - Topics in Biology


    Fall and Spring (1-4) Staff.

    Areas of special current research interest presented by resident and visiting faculty members as opportunity and demand arise. Hours to be arranged. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • BIOL 506 - Cell Biology


    Fall and Spring 3 Wawersik, Shakes.

    An introduction to the principles by which eukaryotic cells function with an emphasis on the molecular biology of cells and experimental approaches to their analysis. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 507 - Cell Biology Laboratory


    Fall 1 Shakes. Prereq/Corequisite(s): BIOL 506 .

    An introduction to the use of light and electron microscopy, histological procedures and biochemical techniques, including electrophoresis, centrifugation, respirometry and isotopes. Three laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 509 - Virology


    Fall 3 Williamson. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220, 221, 225, 226, and 310.

    This course gives an overview of fundamental concepts in virology. Topics include the discovery of viruses, principles of virus structure, viral morphogenesis, virus detection methods, viral vaccines, and ecological significance of viruses. A strong emphasis is placed on molecular mechanisms of viral replication. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 510 - Animal Behavior


    Fall 3 Cristol. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 302. PSYC 201 or equivalent recommended.

    The study of vertebrate and invertebrate behaviors as adapted traits under the influence of both genes and the environment. Animal behavior, including that of humans and endangered species, will be placed in an ecological and evolutionary context. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 511 - Animal Behavior Laboratory


    Spring 1 Cristol. Prereq/Corequisite(s): BIOL 510  and any course in statistics.

    This lab is not required for students taking BIOL 510 . Course designed to give students experience in designing and undertaking publication-quality research to solve real questions about animal behavior. Three laboratory hours, out-of-class data acquisition necessary.

  
  • BIOL 512 - Vascular Plant Systematics


    Fall 4 Case. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 304 or equivalent.

    A study of the principles and research methods of vascular plant systematics, emphasizing classification, evolution, and comparative morphology of the major families of vascular plants. Three class hours, four laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 514 - Biochemistry


    Spring 3 Staff. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 305 or CHEM 308 or consent of instructor.

    A study of the molecular basis of living processes. The chemistry of the important constituents of living matter; energy metabolism; enzyme kinetics; thermodynamics; biosynthesis; metabolic control. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 515 - General Endocrinology


    Spring 3 Bradley. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 302, CHEM 307.

    The role of hormones in homeostasis, control of metabolic processes, and reproduction. This is an introductory course and is a prerequisite for Experimental Endocrinology. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 516 - Ornithology


    Fall 4 Cristol. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 302. BIOL 510  and BIOL 413 recommended. Prereq/Corequisite(s): Offered in alternate years.

    Lectures, laboratory exercises, field experiments and birding trips will provide a comprehensive introduction to the ecology and evolution of birds. Phylogenetic relationships, behavior, conservation and identification of Virginia’s avian fauna will be stressed. Three class hours, three laboratory hours, and several early morning field trips.

  
  • BIOL 517 - Population and Community Ecology


    Fall 4 Staff. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 302 or equivalents.

    Discussion of the structure and dynamics of ecological populations and biotic communities. Emphasis will be on environmental constraints and species interactions that control population growth and determine both diversity and similarities in community structure and function. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 518 - Functional Ecology


    Spring 3 Sanderson. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 302 or equivalent

    Concepts and approaches in physiological ecology, biomechanics, and ecological morphology. The course emphasizes critical thinking, discussion, and student presentations on journal articles from the primary literature. Hypothesis formulation and methods of data collection and analysis will be studied. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 519 - Plant Development and Physiology


    Spring 4 Staff. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 304. Note: Offered in alternate years.

    An investigation of major topics in plant biology, emphasizing hormone signaling and post-embryonic development, and the use of genetic, molecular genetic, histological, biochemical and molecular systematics approaches to elucidate major outstanding questions. The accompanying lab introduces students to model plant systems and a range of molecular genetic, histological and systematics techniques.

  
  • BIOL 520 - Genetic Analysis


    Fall 3 Kerscher. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220, 225 or equivalents.

    Discussion of classical and modern genetics. Topics will be drawn from the following: Mendelian inheritance, recombination and linkage, cytogenetics, model genetic systems, mutation analysis, mitochondrial and chloroplast genetics. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 521 - Genetic Analysis Laboratory


    Spring 1 Staff. Prereq/Corequisite(s): BIOL 420 / BIOL 520 .

    Designed to illustrate genetic principles through experimental work with living organisms, including Drosophila, flowering plants and fungi. Three laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 522 - Phycology


    Fall 4 Staff. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 304.

    A study of eukaryotic algae emphasizing the local marine flora. Systematics, morphology, life histories, development, ecology and economic importance will be presented. The laboratory will offer opportunities for collection and identification of macrophytic marine forms and phytoplankton. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 526 - Aquatic Ecology


    Fall 4 Staff. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220.

    Introduction to the ecology of natural water; discussion of the important physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic environments and the adaptations of organisms living in water; community structure and the important processes affecting it, including major aspects of water pollution. Emphasis is on freshwater communities but various aspects of marine ecology are discussed also. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 528 - General Entomology


    Fall 4 Fashing. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220 and 225.

    An introduction to the biology of insects designed to give the student an overview of entomology. Included are such topics as classification, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology, and economic importance. Three class hours, four laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 531 - Physiological Ecology of Plants


    Spring 3 Staff. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 304. Note: Offered in alternate years.

    Consideration of the effects of environment on the growth, physiology, and distribution of plants. The factors which determine the adaptability of plants to various habitats will be discussed.

  
  • BIOL 532 - Principles of Animal Physiology


    Fall and Spring 4 Bradley, Heideman. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 302, CHEM 307.

    The function of the animal as a whole as indicated by the physiology and interrelationships of different organs and organ systems. The emphasis is on vertebrates, with comparative examples from selected invertebrates. Three class hours, four laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 533 - Developmental Biology


    Fall 3 Saha. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 302.

    An introduction to embryonic and postembryonic developmental processes in animals emphasizing cellular differentiation, the generation of form and shape, growth regulation, cellular recognition and communication, molecular control mechanisms of gene expression, developmental neurobiology, and cancer. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 534 - Developmental Biology Laboratory


    Fall 1 Staff. Prereq/Corequisite(s): BIOL 433 / BIOL 533 .

    An intensive examination of molecular techniques as applied to developmental processes; this semester long laboratory will involve cloning and analyzing a developmentally significant gene. Four laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 536 - Advanced Cell Biology


    Fall 3 Shakes. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 406 / BIOL 506 .

    An in-depth study of a specific topic in cell biology based on readings from the current primary literature. Topics will vary but may include the cytoskeleton or cell signaling. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 538 - Immunology Laboratory


    Spring 1 Zwollo. Prereq/Corequisite(s): BIOL 537.

    An introduction to current techniques available to study immune responses in mice. Includes tissue culture of lymphocytes, measuring antibody levels using ELISA techniques, and detection of proteins expressed during lymphocyte development using Western blot analyses.

  
  • BIOL 542 - Molecular Genetics


    Fall 3 Allison. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220, 225, 310 or permission of instructor.

    This course gives a comprehensive introduction to molecular genetics emphasizing genome organization, DNA replication and repair, synthesis of RNA and proteins, regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression, epigenetics, RNA processing, molecular genetics of cancer, DNA biotechnology and human gene therapy. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 543 - Molecular Genetics Laboratory


    Fall 1 Allison. Prereq/Corequisite(s): BIOL 542 .

    Experiments illustrating current techniques in molecular genetics, including basic cloning, transformation of bacteria with recombinant DNA, plasmid and genomic DNA purification, gel electrophoresis, restriction digests, DNA labeling, Southern transfer, PCR and green fluorescent protein expression in transfected mammalian cells. Three laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 546 - Nuclear Structure and Gene Activity


    Spring 3 Allison. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 442, or permission of instructor.

    An in-depth advanced exploration of the structure of the nucleus and molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic gene regulation, based on readings from the current primary literature. Topics will include mechanisms regulating nuclear import and export of transcription factors and RNA, the role nuclear architecture plays in gene activity and RNA processing, and how failure to appropriately coordinate these processes leads to abnormal or diseased states. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 549 - Sexual Selection


    Fall and Spring (1-4) Staff.

    Areas of special current research interest presented by resident and visiting faculty members as opportunity and demand arise. (Hours to be arranged.) This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • BIOL 566 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring variable 3-4 credits Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements.  This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • BIOL 601 - Introduction to Graduate Studies


    Fall 3 Staff.

    This course is required of all biology graduate students. This is a graduate only course designed to expose new students to a range of techniques and skills that will facilitate their involvement in independent research and graduate studies in biology. Students will receive training in critically reviewing the primary literature, developing research questions, research design and data analysis, oral and written presentations, and the responsible and ethical conduct of research, including discussions of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. Students will author both a grant and preliminary research proposal.

  
  • BIOL 610 - Topics in Animal Behavior


    Spring 3 Cristol. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 302. PSYC 201 recommended.

    The study of vertebrate and invertebrate behaviors as adapted traits under the influence of both genes and the environment. Students must also attend, complete assignments, and take exams for BIOL 510  but are not permitted to register for both classes. Course requires a comprehensive research paper based on library research. Three class hours, one discussion hour.

  
  • BIOL 617 - Population and Community Ecology


    Fall 4 Dalgleish.

    Ecology is the scientific study of interactions between organisms and their environment. This course explores the fundamental concepts and current intellectual debates in population and community ecology. In addition, students will be introduced to ecosystem ecology and the ecological study of global change. Because the advancement of ecological theory has relied heavily on conceptual and mathematical models, this class examines mathematical models of population and community dynamics. We will read current articles from ecological literature to illustrate hypothesis-based inquiry in ecology and application of concepts presented in class. The laboratory portion of this course will provide hands-on experience with sampling designs and experimental protocols used by ecologists. The laboratory/field exercises will emphasize ecological data analysis, experimental design, and scientific communication skills.

  
  • BIOL 627 - Wetland Ecosystems


    Fall 4 Perry and DeBerry.

    An investigation of the structure and function of wetland ecosystems, considering their formation and distribution at local, regional and continental scales. Interactions amongst biologic, geologic and hydrologic components in wetland development will be presented in lecture, lab and field exercises. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 636 - Topics in Advanced Cell Biology


    Spring 3 Shakes. Corequisite(s): BIOL 536 .

    Current literature in cell biology will be critically reviewed by class members, with students rotating as discussion leaders. Students must also attend and take exams in BIOL 536  but are not permitted to register for both classes. Four class hours.

  
  • BIOL 637 - Topics in Immunology


    Fall 3 Zwollo.

    Discussions of research articles on topics related to the structure and function of the immune system. Students must also attend, complete assignments, and take exams for BIOL 437 (Immunology) but are not permitted to register for both classes. Four class hours.

  
  • BIOL 639 - Gene Regulation


    Spring 3 Zwollo. Prerequisite(s): either BIOL 442 or BIOL 437 or permission of instructor.

    This course will give students experience in reading and critically analyzing articles from the primary literature. Topics will vary but will involve current research approaches in the field of gene regulation during development of the immune system. Can be taken independently of BIOL 437. Three class hours, one discussion hour.

  
  • BIOL 646 - Nuclear Structure and Gene Activity


    Fall 3 Allison. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 442 or permission of instructor.

    Current literature on the structure of the nucleus and molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic gene regulation will be critically reviewed by class members, with students rotating as discussion leaders. Students must also attend, complete assignments, and take exams for BIOL 546  but are not permitted to register for both classes. Four class hours.

  
  • BIOL 647 - Neurophysiology


    Spring 4 Griffin. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 225, BIOL 302, or permission of instructor.

    An exploration into the basic concepts related to the activity of the nervous system. The course will focus on electrical and chemical signaling within the nervous system and the ability to control and regulate other physiological systems. Three class hours, three laboratory hours, one discussion hour.

  
  • BIOL 648 - Evolutionary Biology


    Spring 3 Swaddle. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220 or BIOL 302.

    An introduction to the mechanisms and outcomes of evolution. Examples are drawn from many disciplines (e.g. genetics, behavior, and paleontology) to discuss how researchers study the evolution of organisms and develop evolutionary theory. Emphasis will be given to organismal processes. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 649 - Sexual Selection


    Spring 3 Swaddle. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220 or BIOL 302. Offered in alternate years.

    An advanced seminar course using the study of sexual selection as a framework to critically examine the primary literature in organismal evolutionary biology and behavioral ecology. Emphasis is placed on student participation in evaluative discussions of published studies and the development of novel ideas for hypothesis testing.

  
  • BIOL 650 - Microbial Pathogenesis


    Fall 3 Forsyth. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 440, or permission of instructor. Offered in alternate years.

    Class covers genetic, immunologic and evolutionary aspects of microbial virulence based on readings from the primary literature. Major bacterial and viral disease mechanisms will be examined.

  
  • BIOL 651 - Topics in Entomology


    Fall 4 Fashing. Corequisite(s): BIOL 528 .

    Depending on the number of students enrolled, current literature in selected fields of entomology will be critically reviewed by class members, or a research project will be assigned. For the literature review option, students will rotate as discussion leaders. Students must also attend lectures and take exams in BIOL 528  but are not permitted to register for both courses. Four class hours, four laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 654 - Biogeography


    Spring 3 Staff. Note: Offered in alternate years.

    Consideration of modern theories relating to the world-wide and local distribution of animals (especially vertebrates) and plants, both as species and as components of faunas, floras, and biotic communities. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 659 - Topics in Evolutionary Genetics


    Spring 4 Staff. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220 or equivalent.

    Students must attend lectures, complete assignments, and take exams in BIOL 501 , and will critically review current literature in population genetics and evolution. In extra meetings, students will rotate weekly as discussion leaders. Students are not permitted to register for both courses. Four class hours, one recitation hour.

  
  • BIOL 660 - Topics in Functional Ecology


    Spring 3 Sanderson.

    Current literature in functional ecology will be critically reviewed by class members, with students rotating as discussion leaders. Students must also attend and take exams in BIOL 518 but are not permitted to register for both classes. Four class hours.

  
  • BIOL 662 - Concepts of Community Ecology


    Spring 3 Staff.

    Consideration of historical and modern concepts of the structure, function, development, and dynamic nature of natural communities and ecosystems, stressing examination of the original scientific literature on dominance and diversity, energy flow and mineral cycling, competitive interactions, ecological succession, and related topics. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 664 - Topics in Plant Conservation


    Spring 2 Case. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 304, BIOL 417 (Population and Community Ecology).

    This is primarily a discussion-based course that introduces key theoretical concepts in the discipline of plant conservation, and examines the current literature focusing on the conservation of population, species, and communities. Students will present papers in the discussion sessions. Two class hours.

  
  • BIOL 665 - Topics in Endocrinology


    Spring 4 Bradley.

    Current literature in endocrinology critically reviewed by class members. Students will present papers and lead discussions. Students must also attend lectures and laboratories in BIOL 515  but are not permitted to register for both courses. Four class hours, four laboratory hours.

  
  • BIOL 667 - Mechanisms of Bacterial Symbiosis


    Fall 3 Forsyth. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 440, or permission of instructor.

    This course explores the molecular basis for bacterial diseases as well as the basis of bacterial host mutualistic relationships. Classic disease causing organisms and their mechanisms for host insult will be compared and contrasted with interactions with beneficial results for both participants. Three class hours.

  
  • BIOL 668 - Experimental Endocrinology


    Spring varies Bradley.

    Detailed study of selected areas of endocrinology. Two class hours, laboratory hours to be arranged.

  
  • BIOL 673 - Topics in Developmental Biology


    Spring 3 Saha.

    This course explores current topics in Developmental Biology through a critical analysis of the papers from the primary literature. Students must also attend lectures in BIOL 533  but are not permitted to register for both courses. Four class hours.

  
  • BIOL 676 - The Autonomic Nervous Systems


    Fall 3 Griffin. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 445 or BIOL 447, or permission of instructor.

    An in-depth look at the division of the central nervous system responsible for much of the basic regulation and drive responsible for survival. This course will focus on the functional anatomy and physiologic responses involved in this control. Three lecture hours, one discussion hour.

  
  • BIOL 682 - Research Seminar


    Fall and Spring 1 Staff.

    Presentations on and discussions of selected biological topics by graduate students. One class hour. This course may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 4 credits.

  
  • BIOL 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring variable 0-2 credits Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course may be repeated.

  
  • BIOL 690 - Problems in Biology


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff. Prerequisite(s): Consent of Departmental Graduate Committee.

  
  • BIOL 695 - Directed Thesis Master’s Research


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-9) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.    This course may be repeated, but no more than 9 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for submitting a master’s thesis.

  
  • BIOL 700 - Thesis


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.  Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a master’s thesis.

  
  • BIOL 766 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring (1-12) Staff Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements.  This course may be repeated.


Chemistry

  
  • CHEM 501 - Advanced Physical Chemistry


    Spring (3) Wustholz.

    Quantum chemistry and molecular spectroscopy.

  
  • CHEM 502 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry


    Spring (3) Pike.

    Principles and applications of symmetry to structure, bonding, and spectroscopy.
     

  
  • CHEM 503 - Advanced Organic Chemistry


    Fall (3) Abelt.

    A structure-reactivity approach to reaction mechanism and synthesis.

  
  • CHEM 504 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry


    Spring (3) O’Brien.

    Advanced topics in analytical chemistry.
     

  
  • CHEM 508 - Computational Chemistry


    Spring (3) Poutsma.

    Principles and applications of computational methods for the determination of molecular structure and energy.

  
  • CHEM 511 - Polymer Science I


    Fall (3) Staff. Note: Not offered in Fall 2017

    An introduction to the chemical aspects of polymer science at the molecular level. Topics include the preparation, modification, degradation, and stabilization of polymers. Reaction mechanisms are stressed.

  
  • CHEM 512 - Polymer Science II


    Spring (3) Staff. Note: (Not offered in 2018)

    A study of the relationships of chemical and physical properties of synthetic and biological polymers to their molecular structure.

  
  • CHEM 515 - Advanced Biochemistry


    Fall (3) Landino.

    A continuation of the study of biological processes on a molecular level begun in CHEM 313 or 414 or BIOL 314 or 414. Membrane biochemistry, molecular immunology, protein structure and function, biochemical applications of genetic engineering, and other topics of current interest.

  
  • CHEM 516 - Polymer Laboratory


    Spring (1) Staff. Note: (Not offered in 2018)

  
  • CHEM 519 - Bioinorganic Chemistry


    Fall (3) Bebout. Prerequisite(s): One semester of Biochemistry, equivalent to CHEM 314 or CHEM 414 or BIOL 314 or BIOL 414

    An intensive examination of current research approaches in the field of bioinorganic chemistry.  Students will gain experience in reading and critically analyzing articles from the primary literature.

  
  • CHEM 557 - Organic Synthesis


    Spring (3) Hinkle.

    An advanced treatment of organic synthetic methods which includes examples of natural products preparations.

  
  • CHEM 558 - Organic Spectroscopy


    Fall (3) Harbron.

    Theory and application of spectroscopic methods to the analysis of organic compounds. Topics include absorption, fluorescence, infrared, and proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies with an emphasis on structure elucidation and other practical applications.

  
  • CHEM 566 - Directed Study


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-4) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail.

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree credits. This course may be repeated.

  
  • CHEM 622 - Quantitative Materials Characterization


    Fall (4) Staff.

    This course presents a wide variety of means by which the properties and characteristics of materials can be experimentally determined. These include electrical, optical, acoustic, thermal, spectroscopic, and resonance methods. The objective is to discuss these separate means under the umbrella of fundamentals of interactions of matter with particles and waves. The course will address issues of data acquisition, such as sampling, discretization, and signal processing. Applications of these techniques to research in materials development, synthesis, processing, and in situ manufacturing. Cross-listed with APSC 622  

  
  • CHEM 623 - Materials Science of Surfaces and Interfaces


    Spring (3) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the Instructor

    Fundamental and applied aspects of metal, inorganic, polymer and other organic surfaces. Solid/solid, solid/liquid and solid/vapor interfaces. Their structure and defects, thermodynamics, reactivity, electronic and mechanical properties. Applications depend on class interests, but have previously included microelectronics, soils, catalysis, colloids, composites, environment sensitive mechanical behavior, UHV single crystal studies, materials durability, batteries and fuel cells, vacuum science and technology, and surface bioactivity. Cross-listed with APSC 623  

  
  • CHEM 640 - Membrane Proteins: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Research


    Fall (3) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor. Note: Chem 415 (Advanced Biochemistry) or the equivalent highly recommended.

    Biological membranes and their constituents are involved in virtually all processes vital to living organisms, including nutrient uptake, information transfer between the inside and outside of the cell, and the mediation of vital activities such as nerve impulse propagation and hormone signaling. It is therefore not surprising that our modern view of biological cells is profoundly related to the descriptions of their membranes and that membrane-associated receptors, enzymes, and ion channels are prime drug targets. This multi-disciplinary course will cover the interplay between the three-dimensional structures, dynamics, and functions of membrane proteins and lipids, the technical approaches used to characterize their functions and active sites under physiologically-relevant conditions, and the therapeutic potential of targeting membrane proteins to treat a broad range of illnesses, such as neurological disorders, infectious diseases, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Cross-listed with APSC 640  

  
  • CHEM 650 - Graduate Studies in Chemistry


    Fall and Spring (1) Pike.

    This course sequence, designed for the first year graduate student, acquaints them with the state of the art in chemical research with a focus on examination of the primary literature and training in oral presentations. Provides training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research, including discussions of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. Requires attendance at departmental colloquia.

  
  • CHEM 651 - Graduate Studies in Chemistry II


    Fall and Spring (2) Pike. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 650

    Continuation of CHEM 650

  
  • CHEM 652 - Topics in Physical Chemistry


    Spring (3) Staff.

  
  • CHEM 653 - Topics in Nuclear Chemistry


    Fall (3) Staff.

  
  • CHEM 654 - Topics in Inorganic Chemistry


    Spring (3) Staff.

  
  • CHEM 655 - Topics in Analytical Chemistry


    Fall (3) Staff.

  
  • CHEM 656 - Topics in Organic Chemistry


    Fall (3) Staff.

  
  • CHEM 664 - Topics in Biochemistry


    Fall (3) Staff.

  
  • CHEM 666 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail.

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements.  This course may be repeated.

 

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