Mar 02, 2024  
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Explanation of Course Descriptions

Graduate courses may be taken by persons other than regular or provisional graduate students in Arts and Sciences only with the consent of the chairperson of the department/program committee concerned.

Pairs of numbers (501,502) indicate continuous courses. A hyphen between numbers (501-502) indicates that the courses must be taken in the succession stated.

Courses involving laboratory or studio activity are so labeled. All others are classroom courses.

Semester hour credit for each course is indicated by numbers in parentheses.

 

 

Law

  
  • LAW 531 - Selected Topics in Criminal Justice - Mass Incarceration


    Spring (2-3) Jeffrey Bellin

    This seminar will study the phenomenon of “mass incarceration” in the United States. The first part of the class will explore the explosive growth in recent decades in the number of people sent to prisons and jails through the American Criminal Justice system. We will seek to identify the causes of mass incarceration and discuss potential mechanisms to reduce the country’s prison population. The second portion of the class will consist of student presentations related to the topic of mass incarceration. Each student will chose a topic, in consultation with the instructor, research the topic and make a short presentation to the class. Students will write short analytical papers on their topics. There is no final exam.

  
  • LAW 542 - American Jury Seminar


    Fall 3 Paula Hannaford-Agor

    This seminar provides a broad overview of contemporary jury system management and trial procedure with an emphasis on current policy debates concerning the American jury. The course begins with a brief review of the history of the jury and current public perceptions of its role in contemporary society. It then examines the jury selection process from summoning and qualification procedures through voir dire. After a brief examination of jury behavior and decision-making based on contemporary social science, the course focuses on contemporary issues concerning the American jury in civil and criminal litigation. Specific topics include juror comprehension of expert testimony, civil jury verdicts and awards including punitive awards, racial and ethnic bias in criminal verdicts, and the effects of death qualification procedures in capital juries. Grades are based on a combination of homework assignments, short essays, a group project and class participation.

  
  • LAW 546 - Government Contracts Seminar


    Spring 3 Gilbert Teal

    This course will examine the processes by which the federal government awards and administers contracts ranging from acquisitions of multi-billion dollar weapon systems and large public works contracts, to routine purchases of office equipment and supplies. Discussions will focus on how federal contracting differs from contracting under state law, and address special topics unique to government contracting, such as procurement ethics, socioeconomic considerations, bid protests, changes, contract disputes and litigation, fiscal law requirements, and terminations.

  
  • LAW 561 - Influence of Legal Profession on Legislative and Judicial Process Seminar


    Fall (2-3) Thomas Norment

    George Wythe was the ‘Father’ of the William & Mary Law School. He was an extraordinary lawyer who served in all three branches of Virginia’s government. Wythe’s curriculum insisted his students actively participate in mock legislative sessions which dealt with the substantive and procedural aspects of important legislation pending before the Virginia General Assembly. Wythe understood the inevitable and critical interplay between the legal profession, politics and public policy. History suggests the legal profession has disproportionately impacted legislative outcomes. Our focus this semester will be to examine how this principle remains a truism in the 21st century. In 2007, the Virginia General Assembly passed the highly controversial ‘Omnibus Transportation Bill’ that was dramatically impacted by the legal profession at every conceivable stage; and ultimately declared unconstitutional by the Virginia Supreme Court. This course will use this bill as a framework to more broadly examine the legal profession’s influence on both the substantive and procedural history of legislation. Active student participation will be expected as we analyze, dissect and advocate as appellants and appellees the constitutional merits of this legislation, offering individually, student drafted amendments to cure any constitutional infirmities.

  
  • LAW 587 - Animal Law Seminar


    Spring (1-3) Karen Welch

    This seminar offers a practical survey of legislative and regulatory effects and litigation on behalf of animals under U.S. and International law. The course will address the historical status of animals in the law; the current application of animal protection laws for companion animals, wildlife, and farm and other domesticated animals; legislative efforts and citizen initiatives to strengthen animal protection laws; and the limitations on implementation and enforcement of laws addressing anti-cruelty, wildlife, marine mammal and other areas of animal protection and the impacts of free speech, religious expression, and other Constitutional provisions on animal protection statutes will be explored.

  
  • LAW 595 - Citizen Lawyers Seminar - Lessons in Leadership


    Fall (1-3) Alan Rudlin

    In addition to offering professional advice as counselors at law, lawyers in America have often been citizen leaders, playing key societal roles in politics, business, and their community. How does traditional legal thinking and analysis work for lawyers in citizen leadership roles, often beyond a purely legal context? This class will address that question, and seek to broaden your approach to problem-solving. We will focus as a case study on how lawyer-leaders performed both in advising policy-makers and sometimes playing those policy roles during the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam war. We’ll assess the process of their decision-making, and see what lessons can be learned for all citizen lawyers. Henry Kissinger has commented that U.S. foreign policy has suffered in part because key players have often been lawyers, who lack an appropriate historical perspective in making decisions. We’ll consider if that is a valid criticism and examine other ways that decisions might have been better made. We will also address the topic of Executive War Powers authority, which remains a live issue for our country today. This class is intended to sharpen your skills in conceptual problem-solving, and how to think beyond narrow legal frameworks when appropriate. The goal is to develop that most vital of all lawyer skills: good judgement. We will also assess how ethical factors contribute to better leadership decision skills. Class Approach: There will be a variety of assigned reading, selected in part from the books noted below. We will consider four groups of decision makers: White House advisors, the State Department, Congress, and the Pentagon, and evaluate how each “client group” contributed to the decisions being made. Prominent guest speakers will be invited to address us as well. Student Eligibility: The seminar is primarily intended for second and third year law students. The course will be graded on Pass-Fail basis, based on class discussion and a short essay to be submitted after the course conclusion. Primary Assigned Reading (Selections): Dereliction of Duty - by Gen. H.R. McMaster Lessons in Disaster - by Gordon M. Goldstein

  
  • LAW 598 - Selected Topics in Juvenile Law Seminar


    Fall (1-2) Helivi Holland

    This course will explore issues relating to two groups of juveniles: those who may be in need of protection and those who come into conflict with the criminal law. This seminar will take place in five parts. Part I - Overview of Juvenile Law; Part II - Child Welfare - Juveniles in Need of Protection from Others and Themselves; Part III - Prosecution and defense of Juveniles Charged with Crimes; Part IV - Juveniles in Custody at a Juvenile Correctional Facility; Part V - The Judicial Considerations when Juveniles are Before the Court. Knowledge gained from this course will assist students as future lawyers and policy makers to better shape the juvenile court system. Grading for this course will be 20% class participation and 80% based on a paper. The course will be graded.

  
  • LAW 604 - Islamic Law Seminar


    Fall (1-3) Christie Warren

    This course will examine the historic roots of Islam and its significance as law and religion before surveying several representative systems of Islamic law. Satisfies the Writing Requirement.

    This course satisfies the writing requirement.
  
  • LAW 619 - Supreme Court Seminar


    Fall (2-3) Neal Devins

    This course will look at the Court’s most recent term, the current term, and consider the relationship of the Court to Congress (including the Gorsuch confirmation), the President, and state officials; this course will also provide students with an opportunity to meet leading judges (including Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, 2 federal court of appeals judges, and perhaps a state supreme court justice), Supreme Court advocates, and commentators. We will meet most but not all weeks at the regularly scheduled time. Students will also attend parts of the annual Supreme Court Preview program (Sept 15 evening & Sept 16 morning or afternoon), and take a 2 day field trip to Washington, DC to meet judges/justices, advocates, and attend oral arguments (most likely Nov 6-7). Students earning 3 credits will write a paper of around 25 pages and three short pass-fail memos (1 page). Students earning 2 credits will write three memos of around 5-6 pages. Students earning 2 credits must attend all class sessions and do related readings.

  
  • LAW 627 - Selected Topics in Insurance Regulation Seminar


    Fall (1-3) Stephen Carney

    Since its inception, insurance has evolved from a purely private contractual arrangement to a highly regulated industry. This course will explore how legal and regulatory principles have changed to address this ever more complex industry. We will also explore the public policy underpinning the development of our complex insurance regulatory system. Specific topics covered will include the creation and growth of the regulatory process, the state versus federal debate over the regulation of insurance, the powers of state insurance commissioners (both legal and practical), and how the regulatory process imposes specific restrictions and requirements on certain areas of insurance and certain types of insurance products. We will also explore how public policy pressures are currently affecting insurance law and regulation (e.g., legal and legislative reactions to the insurance industry’s handling of major catastrophes, such as hurricane Katrina, the attempts by both the states and the federal government to create residual markets to cover losses which the private market is unwilling to take on, and the effect of the current health care reform debate on the health insurance landscape). In addition to the writing requirement, students will have an opportunity to participate in a debate on the comparative benefits of state and federal regulation of insurance and to select a cutting-edge topic for class discussion.

  
  • LAW 628 - Selected Topics in Race & American Legal History Seminar


    Fall (1-3) Davison Douglas

    Seminar topics will vary from term to term but will focus on race as it relates to American legal history. NOTE: you may not register for this course if you have successfully completed or currently enrolled in LAW 685, Race, Law, & Lawyering in Diverse Environments.

  
  • LAW 630 - The Death Penalty Seminar


    Spring (2-3) Tommy Miller

    This course will explore the history, constitutional rules and implementation of the death penalty in the United States. We will examine the special requirements for a capital trial including the selection of a ‘death qualified’ jury, use of aggravating and mitigating evidence in the punishment phase of the trial, and the right to effective counsel. Arguments by proponents and opponents of the death penalty will be discussed. Students will write a research paper on an instructor approved topic and present the results of their research in class.

  
  • LAW 638 - Statutory Interpretation Seminar


    Fall (2-3) Allison Larsen

    This seminar is a scholarly exploration of the modern debate about how courts should (and do) interpret statutes. The course is not designed to be a comprehensive survey of thinking about statutory interpretation. Rather, the course is designed to introduce you to, and encourage you to think critically about, several of the major theories and themes that inform the modern debate (the virtues and vices of, for example, textualism, purposivism, legislative history, and the public choice theory of legislation). It is also designed to give each student an opportunity to sharpen his or her skills of critical analysis by writing critiques (and also defending) articles addressing issues of statutory construction. Grades will be based on the short written critiques (less than 10 pages a piece) and classroom participation.

  
  • LAW 644 - Taxation of Mergers & Acquisitions Seminar


    Spring (2-3) William Richardson Prerequisite(s): LAW 438

    This advanced course focuses primarily on corporate acquisitions. It will explore different ways to structure both nontaxable and taxable combinations of business entities, the tax goals and consequences of such transactions, and the role of the tax lawyer in representing a party to a business combination. This course will build on concepts introduced in the Law 438 Corporate Tax course, completion of which is a prerequisite unless waived by Professor Richardson. Waivers generally will be granted for students whose class rank is in the top 20% or whose grade in Federal Income Taxation (Law 311) is A- or higher. This course may be taken for either two or three credits; in order to earn three credits, students are required to write a paper of approximately ten pages, in addition to completing the exam.

  
  • LAW 649 - Selected Topics in Special Ed Law


    Summer only 1 Christina Jones

    This one week mini-course features national and regional experts teaching the following topics: special education case law, legislation, and regulations; utilizing evaluations, tests and measurements in determining eligibility in special education, and in the preparation of Individualized Education Programs and Section 504 Plans; issues of juvenile justice, behavior and discipline for students with disabilities; strategies for negotiating with schools and working with parents; dispute resolution procedures in special education; preparing legal claims and remedies on behalf of students with disabilities who are denied an appropriate education; and creating systemic change in the system. Students will attend more than 25 hours of instruction with fellow attorneys, law students, and experienced advocates interested in learning how to represent children and families in special education. Preparation for and participation in all sessions is required, as well as a paper of no less than ten double-spaced pages on a mutually agreeable topic, due to Professor Roberts by August 10th. This is a two-credit graded course. Further scheduling details can be found on the PELE Clinic website.

  
  • LAW 651 - The Resurgent Role of Legal History in Modern Judicial Decision-making Seminar


    Spring (2-3) D Kelsey

    Taught by Judge D. Arthur Kelsey of the Virginia Court of Appeals, this course examines the increasingly prominent role legal history plays in modern judicial decision-making and the jurisprudential factors that explain it. The class will survey recent U.S. Supreme Court and state cases decided primarily with historical reasoning, examine the cited historical sources directly, and consider academic praise and criticism of the judicial invocation of legal history all toward the goal of equipping students to confidently incorporate historical argument into their legal thinking as well as their future advocacy.

  
  • LAW 659 - Religion and American Law; A Contest of Values


    Fall (2-3) Mark McGarvie

    The United States is generally understood to have separated church and state through its First Amendment to the Constitution; but, the nation’s history belies this assumption. In this course, students will consider the history of Christian influences upon American law, from the colonial era to the present. Hopefully, students will form their own appreciations and understandings for both the role of law in shaping and adjudicating ideological debates and the limitations that competing cultural values impose upon the law. The classroom discussions will focus on weekly reading assignments offering a wide range of historical, legal, and cultural perspectives. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation in classroom discussions and a final paper. The final paper topic will be assigned on the first day of class and will be based entirely on materials used in the class. A different paper assignment is offered to students who take the class in fulfillment of the writing requirement. Two credit course; three credits if taken in fulfillment of writing requirement.

  
  • LAW 663 - Selected Topics in Sports Law Seminar


    Spring (1-3) Andrew Larsen

    This seminar will consider various topics regarding sports law. The nature of the topics will change from term to term

  
  • LAW 674 - Property Theory Seminar


    Spring (2-3) James Stern

    This seminar will explore advanced topics in property law, including the meaning of property and property rights, the way property systems and structures work, and the origins, justification, and limits of property law. Course materials will consist of foundational legal, historical, and philosophical texts, as well as significant current scholarship. After several weeks of background reading, each session will be devoted to intensive study of a single law review article. For each article, one student will prepare a written critique and one student will be asked to defend the article in class against the critique. The course will stress skills of close reading, critical analysis, and persuasive argumentation. Thorough preparation and active participation each session are essential. Grading will be based upon a ten-page critique of a designated law review article, oral defense of a designated article, and class participation.

  
  • LAW 677 - History of the Common Law Seminar


    Fall (2-3) Thomas McSweeney

    We use the term “common law” to refer to the Anglo-American legal system as a whole, but England and early America were actually patchworks of competing legal systems. There was no common law of marriage or probate, both of which came from canon law, or of trusts, which came from equity. Devices like the fee tail, which we think of as ancient common law, were actually statutory. Judicial review might have its origins in the relationship between England and the colonies, not in traditional common law doctrines, and an important point of debate after 1789 was the degree to which the U.S. constitution had either abrogated or adopted the common law. Over time, most of these competing legal systems have been incorporated into the system we know as the common law. In this course, we will examine the history of the common law from its beginning in the 12th century to the present by looking at its interaction and competition with these different systems of law. We will read and discuss both primary and secondary sources. Grading will be based on class participation and the written work submitted.

  
  • LAW 679 - Climate Change


    Fall (1-3) Lynda Butler

    This course will examine the phenomenon of global climate change and its implications for law and policy across all institutional levels. Climate change will be examined both as a physical and social phenomenon with implications for scientific, legal, economic, and political systems. In addition to exploring the global response, the course will study the U.S. approach, including federal, state, local and private initiatives. Topics of study may include, among others, renewable energy, sustainable land development, property rights and climate change, food sustainability, carbon sequestration, and regulation of greenhouse gas emissions.

  
  • LAW 683 - Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Seminar


    Fall (2-3) Jay Butler

    This seminar will examine the assertion of extraterritorial regulatory and enforcement jurisdiction over persons, entities and activities abroad. Topics likely: reach of the U.S. Constitution and of U.S. statutory law, the limits of personal jurisdiction, the Alien Tort Stature, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, cyber-crime and the application of the international treaties to armed forces serving overseas. A comparative approach to the exercise of extraterritorial jurisdiction may also be utilized. Grade to be based on a research paper.

  
  • LAW 684 - Elder & Disability Law Clinic II (EDLC II)


    Spring 2 Helena Mock Prerequisite(s): LAW 784

    Advanced clinical experience in Elder and Disability Law which allows up to four students selected by the Professor who have successfully completed the Elder & Disability Law Clinic I to expand and further refine their research, writing, and advocacy skills through increased autonomy in representation of clients in more complicated legal matters. Students in EDLC II will provide assistance and advocacy in matters involving competency, nursing home issues, and Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security and other public benefit programs, including service-connected compensation and non-service connected pension benefits from the VA. Students will also gain skills in working with state and local agencies on elder law issues, and in preparing themselves and their clients for legal and administrative hearings. They will hone the acquired knowledge and skills by presenting public seminars or preparing materials on issues important to the elderly community and those with disabilities. Students will be graded on the quality of their work and their ability to represent multiple clients and manage multiple cases. Students may be required to mentor EDLC I students in these skills. This clinic will be taught by Professor Helena Mock and Erin Smith. Weekly times TBD. Graded, 2 credit course. Prerequisite: Elder & Disability Law Clinic I, open to both 2Ls and 3Ls.

  
  • LAW 685 - Race, Law, and Lawyering in Diverse Environments


    Spring 3 Vivian Hamilton

    The primary goal of this course is to explore ways in which people have used law both to perpetuate and to challenge racial injustice in the United States. It begins with a brief survey of race-based law from the nation’s founding through the Supreme Court’s 1967 decision in Loving v. Virginia. It then explores the Critical Race Theory academic movement, perspectives on racial identity, race as social construction, and identity performance. And it examines the intersections of race and laws governing (inter alia) education, employment, criminal justice, affirmative action, and electoral processes. The secondary goal of the course is to explore ways in which the increasing diversity of society and of the legal profession affects the practice of law. Legal practice involves interpersonal activity, and all lawyers will interact with colleagues and clients whose cultural heritage differs from their own. This course thus explores the significance of culture and cultural differences in the practice of law. It introduces Intercultural Communication Theory - the study of interactions between people of different cultural backgrounds - to provide students (of all racial/cultural backgrounds) a framework upon which to enhance their capacities to communicate effectively and work productively with attorney colleagues and clients with identity backgrounds different than their own. Grading is based on (1) 2-3 short reflection papers or an in-class presentation (student’s choice); and (2) a take-home (24 hrs.) self-scheduled exam. NOTE: you may not register for this course if you have successfully completed or currently enrolled in LAW 628, Race and American Legal History.

  
  • LAW 688 - Mergers & Acquisitions Simulation


    Fall 1 Louanna Heuhsen Prerequisite(s): LAW 464

    This course is a joint venture involving law students and business students. Students will analyze, negotiate, and agree upon a corporate acquisition in a simulation exercise based on a real estate transaction. Students will work with experienced business professionals and mergers and acquisitions attorneys. The final work product will be a letter of intent and term sheet executed by both sides of the transaction, a memorandum outlining the duties of the target board, and a valuation presentation. The course will be graded pass/fail. The regular mergers and acquisitions course, LAW 464, is a prerequisite.

  
  • LAW 691 - Advanced Applied International Research


    Spring 2 Christie Warren

    After receiving training in International and Comparative Legal and Policy Research, students will be divided into small teams and assigned to work directly with international projects working in developing and post-conflict environments. As requested by project managers, research teams will conduct comparative legal and policy research used to support development and peacebuilding strategies. Participating projects may be located in countries such as Cambodia, China, Uganda, South Africa, Kyrgyzstan and the Hague. Students will be individually assigned to one of the participating organizations and will receive research assignments directly from field supervisors. Over the course of the semester each student will generate 15 to 20 pages of research to be reviewed and graded by Professor Warren before being turned in to field projects. Students interested in participating must apply directly to Professor Christie Warren at cswarr@wm.edu. Please submit a cover letter explaining your interest and any international or comparative coursework you have completed along with a current resume.

  
  • LAW 693 - Entertainment Law Litigation Seminar


    Spring 2 Paul Marcus

    This course will explore current issues involved in American entertainment law as litigated in our courts. The unifying features here will be problems that are current, practical, complex, and that involve constitutional, statutory, case law, and policy analysis. We will focus on four principal areas: protection of ideas by contract, defamation, rights of privacy (both public disclosure of private facts and false light), and the right of publicity. We will not consider in depth Copyright or Trademark Law. Enrollment is limited. Class will meet in one two-hour session each week. The first hour will be a discussion led by students on the assigned topic; I will then lead a further discussion of that topic for the second hour. At least two weeks prior to the designated oral assignment, students must meet with me to discuss the substance of their presentation, the format for it, and the preparation of reading materials and discussion questions for the other students in the class. Depending on class size, each student will prepare either two or three presentations as part of a group. There is no assigned text, readings will be distributed electronically throughout the semester. The grade for this class will be determined as follows: 50% for class presentation and class participation apart from the presentations, and 50% for a paper due the last day of class. There will be no final exam.

  
  • LAW 694 - Legal Aspects of Corporate Finance


    Spring 3 Kevin Haeberle Prerequisite(s): LAW 320 OR LAW 303

    This course provides a survey of some of the more prominent advanced-level topics in corporate and securities law as seen through the lens of economics (namely, financial economics). Topics will likely include the efficient capital markets hypothesis, modern portfolio theory, the valuation of rights to future cash flows, the mechanics and economics of financial-instrument markets (with a focus on the stock market), and the role of stock prices in capital allocation and corporate governance. It will also take a finance and economics-based look at issues relating to shareholder voting and corporate takeovers. Notably, Legal Aspects of Corporate Finance involves only very basic mathematical formulas, and emphasizes intuitive and graphical understandings of economics and finance for lawyers rather than math. Students must have completed Business Associations or Corporations before enrolling in this course.

  
  • LAW 697 - Securities Litigation


    Spring 3 Kevin Haeberle

    This course examines the federal law and policies governing the purchase and sale of securities, particularly the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as well as the regulations and case law relating to each. More precisely, the course focuses on the litigation devices that help ensure more robust securities disclosure. (Securities-disclosure law forms the heart of the closely related Securities Regulation class, and much securities and corporate transactional work relies on a strong understanding of that law.) Although this course will touch on securities-disclosure law, its primary focus is thus different than the Securities Regulation course. This litigation-focused course will instead primarily study public and private litigation under Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. It will also allocate much time to other important provisions under which much securities litigation proceeds today (namely, sections 11, 12, and 17 of the Securities Act of 1933). Lastly, the class will explore insider-trading prosecutions under the federal securities laws in an in-depth manner. Note; students may not enroll in LAW 697 Securities Litigation after successfully completing LAW 423 Securities Regulation, nor enroll for both courses concurrently.

  
  • LAW 701 - Legal Writing and Research


    Fall/Spring (1-2) Jennifer Stevenson

    Students will learn essential information about the U.S. legal system and fundamental principles of legal decision making, as well as legal analysis, writing, research, and other practical skills. Students will work with law school legal writing faculty and research librarians to research and write objective office memoranda and other legal documents.

  
  • LAW 703 - Directed Reading


    Summer/Fall/Spring 1 Staff

    An examination of a specialized subject that generally is not offered as a course within our curriculum on a regular basis. This course is arranged between an individual student or group of students (maximum, 5) through readings selected in agreement by the directing faculty member and students. This course meets for at least 700 minutes over the course of the term. Prior approval by the Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development is required. Students are limited to one Directed Reading credit per year. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

  
  • LAW 704 - Independent Legal Research


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-2) Staff

    This course requires the completion of a scholarly paper on a subject selected by the student, under the supervision of a faculty member. Does not satisfy the writing requirement. For Law 704-02 or 03, please see term description.

  
  • LAW 705 - Independent Legal Writing


    Summer/Fall/Spring 2 Staff

    This course requires the completion of a significant research paper on a topic selected by the student, under the supervision of a faculty member. Students may enroll in this course for credit no more than twice and this course satisfies the writing requirement. An important goal of the major paper requirement is to improve students’ writing skills. Faculty supervisors should communicate this goal to students at the beginning of the process and reinforce it throughout the paper-writing process, especially after submission of the first draft. Papers that satisfy the major paper requirement should evolve through four major stages, each of which should occur in consultation with the supervising faculty member: 1. Topic Development: The student should produce a succinct, coherent topic statement that sets out the thesis of the proposed paper. 2. Outline: The student should produce a reasonably comprehensive outline of the paper, including a statement of the basic steps in the argument, the major sources used, and a tentative conclusion or a comparable writing. 3. First Draft: The student should produce a first draft of the paper in time for the supervising faculty member to make comments and for the student to respond to those comments in the form of a second draft. Normally, the first draft should be submitted to the supervising faculty member by the end of the 10th week of classes. 4. Final Draft: The student should turn in the final draft of the paper by noon on the last day of exams for the semester, or as otherwise designated by the professor.

  
  • LAW 711 - Spanish for Lawyers


    Spring 1 Denise Koch

    This is a one-credit course that will give students an opportunity to use Spanish language skills in a legal context. This class will begin with a grammar review and an introduction to basic legal vocabulary in Spanish. Each class will then concentrate on one substantive area (i.e., Family Law, Immigration Law, Criminal Law and Business/Employment Law). Students will learn and be able to use in an oral and written context vocabulary related to each area. Oral exercises including discussion and role play will help students to further develop listening and speaking skills. Literature and films appropriate to the topics will be used to stimulate discussion related to the legal issues involved and the realities of Spanish speaking citizens in the U.S. The course will meet once a week for 50 minutes. Materials will include THE ABA LEGAL SPANISH PHRASEBOOK, AL TANTO: CATORCE CUENTOS CONTEMPORANEOS, CINEMA FOR SPANISH CONVERSATION, and various legal documents in the target language. This will be a pass/fail course. Students will be evaluated through vocabulary quizzes, performance on oral role playing exercises, and a final group project or written/oral examination TBD. Students should have intermediate or advanced proficiency in spoken and written Spanish.

  
  • LAW 716 - Power, Influence & Responsible Leadership


    Spring (1-3) Jose de Areilza

    This is a course about learning to use power and influence as effective tools for both understanding your surroundings and achieving your goals. It is a course about getting things done in the real world, where politics and personalities can often seem to hinder rather than help you. It is a course for those of you who want to make things happen, despite the obstacles that might stand in your way. Consequently, it is a course about you. Course Objectives: This course presents conceptual models, tactical approaches and self-assessment tools to help you understand political dynamics as they unfold around you and develop your influence style. By focusing on specific expressions of power and influence this course gives you the opportunity to observe their effective and ineffective uses in different contexts and stages of a person’s career. The subject matter will introduce different ethical questions. This course should challenge you to define what will constitute the ethical exercise of power and influence in your life. In this course we will rely on a mix of case studies, exercises, self-assessment tools and readings. Your grade will be based 50% on class participation and 50% on the final paper.

  
  • LAW 720 - Trial Advocacy - Basic Advanced Litigation


    Fall/Spring (1-4) Staff Prerequisite(s): LAW 309 OR LAW 308 OR LAW 309T

    An advanced litigation course intended for those students who have a substantial interest in litigation. The course is designed to develop the student’s skills as a trial lawyer for both civil and criminal cases. Trial Advocacy will deal with trial strategy, jury selection, opening statements, presentation of evidence, including the examination of witnesses, closing arguments, and preparation of jury instructions. Evidence presentation and related technologies will be fully integrated into all aspects of the course. A trial will be required. Students who take Trial Advocacy-Basic Advanced Litigation may not take any other Trial Advocacy section (Tech Trial Ad or National Trial Team Trial Ad) for credit. Pre-requisite: satisfactory completion of Evidence, or co-registration in Evidence. This course is open to any upper-level student who satisfies the pre-req or co-req.

  
  • LAW 722 - Mediation


    Spring (2-3) Charles Poston

    This course is designed for students who are interested in how to effectively incorporate mediation theory into practice. Different models and approaches to mediation will be discussed and students will learn a broad range of skills and techniques through lectures, discussions, video simulations, exercises and role-plays. The process of mediation including convening and preparing for mediation, opening the mediation session, defining the issues, facilitating communication and creative problem-solving, and structuring a mediation will be covered. Skills that are valuable for mediators and advocates such as developing trust and rapport, active listening, formulating questions, gathering information, reframing, and effective interaction for facilitated decision making will be covered. In addition, we will examine legal, ethical and policy issues that arise in the mediation context. This is a 3 credit, graded course.

  
  • LAW 724 - Negotiation for Lawyers


    Spring (1-4) Cynthia Ward

    This course will explore the theoretical and strategic fundamentals of negotiating in a variety of legal situations. The course will be taught in a once-weekly, 2 1/2 hour format and will focus heavily on class exercises and simulations by students working in teams of two, three, or four. The course will cover various issues central to the topic, including the stages of negotiation; psychology of negotiation and related issues such as verbal and non-verbal communication and power and control in the bargaining process; the principal-agent relationship; substantive and strategic differences between unilateral and multilateral negotiations; and the law of settlement. The course grade will be based on (1) student participation in class discussions and exercises; (2) student performance in simulated negotiations; and (3) a final exam which will draw heavily on weekly class discussions of the assigned class materials.

  
  • LAW 727 - Foreign & International Research


    Spring 1 Jennifer Sekula

    Foreign and International Research is a 1-credit pass/fail course that introduces students to a variety of foreign and international law sources and research methods over seven class sessions. Students will learn how to efficiently research secondary information, treaties, and other international agreements, foreign and European Union law, and United Nations documents. Classes meet once a week for seven weeks, and students complete in-class and out-of class research assignments. There is no final exam or required textbook.

  
  • LAW 730 - Advanced Brief Writing


    Fall 2 Jennifer Franklin

    Jennifer Franklin

  
  • LAW 737 - Planning a Chapter 11 Filing


    Fall 1 Jeffrey Schlerf

    This course will provide students with a practical exploration of corporate restructuring and the Chapter 11 process. The course will follow a role-playing, case-study format, in which students will learn about advising a company on restructuring options including preparing for a bankruptcy filing. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis, with assessment based on class participation and some very limited written work product by student teams during the role-playing exercises. Prior knowledge of bankruptcy law is not necessary. 1 credit pass/fail

  
  • LAW 738 - Technology-Augmented Trial Advocacy


    Spring 4 Fredric Lederer Prerequisite(s): LAW 308 OR LAW 309

    Technology-Augmented Trial Advocacy combines instruction in traditional trial practice, including basic deposition practice, with contemporary technology-augmented trial practice techniques, including use of a high-tech record at trial, technologically presented evidence, and remote witness testimony. The course will address trial strategy, jury selection, opening statements, presentation of evidence, including the examination of witnesses, closing arguments, and preparation of jury instructions and will encompass both civil and criminal cases. The course requires satisfactory completion of a jury trial using role-played witnesses. This is a 4-credit pass/fail course open to second-year and third-year students. Students may not enroll in or have Basic Advanced Litigation. Students may take or have taken National Trial Team Trial Ad. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Evidence or Applied Evidence.

  
  • LAW 741 - Virginia Coastal Policy Practicum I


    Fall/Spring 3 Elizabeth Andrews

    Open to 2Ls and 3Ls, the Virginia Coastal Policy Practicum is an experiential class offered by the Virginia Coastal Policy Center (see www.law.wm.edu/vacoastal). The practicum is clinical and interdisciplinary in nature and it focuses on a broad range of policy challenges facing coastal communities and resources. The practicum is taught by Professor Elizabeth Andrews. Graded course.

  
  • LAW 743 - Federal Tax Clinic


    Fall/Spring 3 Craig Bell

    Open to 3Ls, the Federal Tax Clinic offers eight students the opportunity to assist in the representation of low income Virginia taxpayers seeking assistance from the nonprofit Community Tax Law Project before the IRS, U.S. Tax Court, and U.S. District Court. Students will find it helpful if they have taken Federal Income Tax, however Tax is not a prerequisite. Taught by Professor Craig Bell. Pass/fail course.

  
  • LAW 745 - Domestic Violence Clinic


    Fall/Spring 3 Darryl Cunningham

    The goal of this clinic is to represent victims in our community who may not be able to afford legal services so that they can obtain protective orders, and other needed services arising out of that abuse, as well as to educate the community about domestic violence and safety planning. This clinic offers 8 students who have their third-year practice certificate the opportunity to work with the Williamsburg Legal Aid Office (Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia, aka LASEVA) and local shelters and organizations to provide legal assistance to victims of domestic violence and their families. Students will learn the effects of domestic violence on victims, their families, and the community at-large. Students will learn to interview clients, examine witnesses, and prepare for hearings. Under the supervision of attorneys, students will provide legal representation to victims of domestic violence in protection order hearings, child custody and support hearings, and advocate for clients to obtain other needed services. Students will learn about and advise clients on safety planning strategies. In addition to meetings with Professor Darryl Cunningham, LASEVA’s Senior Attorney in Williamsburg, and the clinic’s resident Fellow, Lindsay Barna, there is a one and a half hour classroom meeting per week and planning sessions to prepare presentations to educate the local community about domestic violence. To receive credit for this course, each student MUST attend the first meeting. Pass/Fail course.

  
  • LAW 746 - Family Law Clinic


    Fall/Spring 3 Darryl Cunningham

    Open to 3Ls, the Family Law Clinic offers eight students who have their third-year practice certificate the opportunity to represent and advise clients of limited financial means from the Williamsburg office of the Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia (LASEVA), in divorce, custody, support and equitable distribution matters. Taught by Professors Darryl Cunningham and Lindsay Barna. Pass-fail course.

  
  • LAW 747 - Innocence Project Clinic I


    Fall (2-3) Frederick Gerson

    This clinic offers eight students the opportunity to engage in the legal investigation and research of inmate claims of actual innocence under Richmond attorney Fred Gerson. Using primary sources including police and forensic reports, court pleadings, transcripts, appellate briefs and opinions, students will research and prepare written summaries of the cases referred to the Clinic by the Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project (MAIP), so that MAIP may determine whether or not to pursue the innocence claim. Students will have the opportunity to conduct interviews of inmates and possible witnesses, as well as other preparatory case work with private investigators, forensics experts and attorneys. The Clinic’s focus will include DNA evidence, investigative activities, post-conviction remedies and procedures, and in-class simulations. Students will gain an understanding of the various ways innocent people are convicted and discuss remedies for exoneration. In-class discussions will systematically prepare students to undertake the investigations necessary to assess prisoner’s claims of factual innocence. Although the investigations are as varied as the cases, they can generally be placed into two categories; (1) cases involving searches for DNA evidence, and (2) cases involving non-biological evidence. In all of the cases, students, supervised by the professor and MAIP staff and volunteers, will work with the prisoner, former attorneys, courts, and police departments to create complete files to determine an investigative strategy. In DNA cases, students contact (and sometimes visit) courthouses, police departments, labs, and hospitals to determine whether any testable physical evidence remains in files or warehouses from cases that are often decades old. In non-DNA cases, students will interview eyewitnesses, alibi witnesses, co-defendants, and, in some cases, alternative suspects, and perform other necessary investigation, again to include travel throughout the Commonwealth. Occasionally cases also require travel to a prison in order to interview a prisoner. Ideally, in instances where MAIP accepts the case and assigns it to an attorney, the Clinic students who worked on the case will remain involved with it, thus preserving continuity and providing students with an even fuller learning experience. Innocence Project II will be offered in the spring semester for those who choose to enroll and have successfully completed Innocence Project Clinic I; ideally the students from IP I will enroll in IP II, for a more in-depth semester of work and skill building on their assigned cases. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in or have completed Evidence. Weekly clinic seminar Thursdays 6:00-8:30 pm. To receive credit for this course, each student MUST attend the first meeting. Pass/fail course. Pre or Co-requisite: Evidence Law 309 or Law 309T.

  
  • LAW 749 - Non-Profit Organization Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Robert Kaplan

    Eligible placements include U.S. civil legal services/legal aid organizations and U.S. private, nonprofit, 501(c)(3) organizations. Private nonprofit organizations with IRS status other than 501(c)(3) are not eligible for externship credit. Organizations outside the U.S. are eligible if they would qualify for 501(c)(3) status if they were U.S. organizations. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 1-3 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 752 - Virginia Attorney General Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Catherine Bellin

    Eligible placements include the divisions/sections of the Virginia Attorney General’s office. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 1-3 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 753 - State & Local Government Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Catherine Bellin

    Eligible placements include state or local government agencies and offices, such as city/county attorneys, attorneys general, and state legislators. This type of externship covers all William & Mary offices. Placements with prosecutors and public defenders are covered by their respective externships. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 1-3 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 754 - Judicial Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Robert Kaplan

    Eligible placements include judges (including administrative law judges), hearing officers, courts, and organizations that provide research, educational, and management services to judges and courts (e.g., the National Center for State Courts, the Federal Judicial Center, the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts). Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 1-3 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 756 - US Attorney Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Catherine Bellin

    Eligible placements include the civil or criminal divisions of U.S. Attorney offices. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 1-3 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 758 - Federal Government Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Catherine Bellin

    Eligible placements include Federal agencies (including JAG Corps). They also include Congressional committees and members of Congress, subject to the prohibition on partisan political activities and lobbying. Federal Public Defenders are covered by the Public Defender Externship; U.S. Attorney offices are covered by the U.S. Attorney Externship. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. (1-3 credits). Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 759 - Private Practice/In-House Counsel Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Catherine Bellin

    Eligible placements include solo practitioners, law firms, and in-house law departments of corporations and trade associations. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 1-3 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 760 - William & Mary Law Review


    Fall/Spring (1-4) Nathan Oman

    Preparation and editing of comments and notes for the William and Mary Law Review; editing of professional articles. Limited to the board and staff members of the Review.

  
  • LAW 761 - William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal


    Fall/Spring (1-4) Neal Devins

    Preparation and editing of student notes for the William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal; and editing of professional articles. Limited to the board and staff members of the Journal.

  
  • LAW 762 - William & Mary Environmental Law & Policy Review


    Fall/Spring (1-4) Ronald Rosenberg

    Preparation and editing of student notes for the William and Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review; editing of professional articles. Limited to the board and staff members of the Review.

  
  • LAW 763 - William & Mary Journal of Women & the Law


    Fall/Spring (1-4) Vivian Hamilton

    Preparation and editing of student notes for the William and Mary Journal of Women and the Law; editing of professional articles. Limited to the board and staff members of the Journal.

  
  • LAW 764 - William & Mary Business Law Review


    Fall/Spring (1-4) Darian Ibrahim

    Preparation and editing of student notes for the William & Mary Business Law Review; editing of professional articles. Limited to the board and staff members of the Review.

  
  • LAW 766 - Advanced Professional Development II for 2Ls and 3Ls (APD II)


    Spring 2 Fredric Lederer Prerequisite(s): LAW 765 OR LAW 765 OR LAW 765 OR LAW 765

    Advanced Professional Development is a two semester legal skills course based on simulated (role-played) clients. The course supplies additional experiential lawyering skills and experience to both 2L and 3L students. For purposes of simulated representation, participating students will be divided into two simulated law firms, each with two working groups of four students. Each firm will have a supervising faculty “Senior Partner.” Each working group will represent at least two realistic role-played simulated clients. APD II requires APD I and will deal with more advanced and realistic role-played clients than did APD I, with clients ordinarily coming from outside the law school. Each client will require student counsel to interview, negotiate, conduct legal research, and prepare written memoranda. APD II will require student counsel to use creativity and a range of legal mechanisms and procedures to achieve client goals. Time-keeping and (simulated) billing are required. Clients will present occasional professional responsibility issues for student resolution. When the course is fully implemented, student lawyers will also have to use proficiently a wide selection of legal technology. Client representations will be “open-ended,” meaning that should unforeseen issues develop in a representation, students must cope with them unless the Senior Partners determine that doing so would not be academically advantageous. Dean Ende will contribute his experience, knowledge and the results of his discussions with law firms and other employers to ensure that the course addresses what employers believe to be deficiencies in many law school graduates. The course curriculum will have input from Dean Ende, Professor Killinger, and Professor Roberts. Grading is Honors, pass/fail.

  
  • LAW 769 - Curricular Pratical Training in Law


    Summer only 1 Robert Kaplan

    This course is for international JD students in F-1 status who want to engage in paid internships and require Curricular Practical Training (CPT) authorization. Although CPT is not required for unpaid internships, the Reves Center for International Studies strongly recommends credit for unpaid internships. The Law School endorses that recommendation. Prior approval for CPT - for either a paid or unpaid internship - is required from both the University’s Designated School Official (DSO) in the Reves Center and Dean Kaplan. Students cannot complete more than 15 paid CPT hours per week during fall or spring semesters. There is no weekly maximum hour limit for summer paid CPT. To apply for CPT authorization, the student and the student’s supervisor must complete a CPT Objectives and Site Agreement. A written report by the student of at least five pages and a written evaluation by the student’s field supervisor are due by the date in the CPT course syllabus. The syllabus also describes the format and content of the report and the evaluation. Credit earned for this course does not apply toward the total credits required for the JD degree, nor does the credit count toward the total pass/fail credits permitted for graduation. In addition, this course is distinct from credit-bearing externships. Credit earned and hours completed for the CPT course cannot be counted toward an externship, and externship credit and hours completed cannot be counted toward the CPT course. However, a student may earn CPT credit and externship credit for the same internship if the student satisfies the requirement for both courses.

  
  • LAW 770 - Prosecutor Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Catherine Bellin

    Eligible placements include state and local prosecutors. Placements with U.S. Attorney offices are covered by the U.S. Attorney Externship. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 1-3 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 771 - Public Defender Externship


    Summer/Fall/Spring (1-3) Robert Kaplan

    Eligible placements include federal, state, and local public defenders. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 1-3 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 772 - Washington, DC Semester Externship (3Ls with minimum 3.0 GPA; fall semester only)


    Fall only 12 Judith Conti

    3Ls With Minimum 3.0 GPA; fall semester only. Eligible placements include federal, state, and local government agencies, courts/judges, prosecutors, public defenders, legal aid offices, or 501(c)(3) organizations in Washington, DC, or the Northern Virginia or Maryland suburbs of DC. Finalizing an externship requires 3 steps before the registration deadline: (1) securing an externship; (2) submitting a completed Externship Agreement; and (3) registering for the correct course and the correct number of credits. 12 credits. Externships are graded Pass/Fail.

  
  • LAW 780 - Veterans’ Benefits Clinic I


    Fall/Spring 3 C. Stone, D. Boelzner

    Puller Veterans Clinic - Disability Compensation and Appeals (DCA)

  
  • LAW 782 - Special Education Advocacy Clinic I (PELE)


    Fall/Spring 3 Christina Jones

    Open to 2Ls and 3Ls, the Special Education Advocacy Clinic (PELE) I offers eight students the opportunity to assist children with special needs and their families in special education matters. Taught by Professor Crystal Shin. Graded course.

  
  • LAW 783 - Puller Veterans Clinic-Separation,Discharges&Leg Adv (SDLA)


    Fall/Spring 3 Aniela Szymanski

    This Puller Veterans Clinic - Separations, Discharges and Legislative Advocacy (SDLA) offers students an opportunity to represent veterans in discharge upgrade cases with the Boards of Correction for Military Records and the Administrative Review Boards of the service branches; assist service members in administrative separations when a mischaracterization of service may result; and advocate for legislative policy changes impacting veterans at the state and/or federal level. The clinic will be taught by Professor Aniela Szymanski and Professor Eleyse D’Andrea. There is a required day-long Boot Camp on Friday, August 25th, for those who have not attended previously. Graded course. Open to 2Ls and 3Ls.

  
  • LAW 784 - Elder & Disability Law Clinic I (EDLC I)


    Fall/Spring (1-3) Helena Mock

    Open to both 2Ls and 3Ls, this clinic will offer ten students the opportunity to practice substantive legal issues affecting the elderly and members of society with disabilities, including estate planning, probate, elder abuse, and guardianships, emphasizing the challenges of identifying the client when there may be diminished capacity. This clinic will be taught by Professors Helena Mock and Erin Smith. Graded course.

  
  • LAW 785 - Innocence Project Clinic II


    Spring only 3 Frederick Gerson Prerequisite(s): LAW 747 AND LAW 309 OR LAW 309T OR LAW 308 AND LAW 309

    Students in the Innocence Project Clinic II will continue to work on cases assigned in the Innocence Project Clinic I, engaging in more in-depth investigative activities, post-conviction remedies and procedures, and in-class simulations relating to inmate claims of actual innocence. Building on the foundation laid in Innocence Project Clinic I, the in-class portion will focus on client and case specific theories of innocence, and will include skills development in interviewing witnesses, handling ethical issues, organizing investigative tasks, and digesting transcripts, among others. The class is designed such that students will act as intake investigators to determine whether representation of a prisoner’s claim of innocence should be undertaken. The work entails understanding core legal concepts relating to criminal trials, reading transcripts, performing legal analysis, and investigating cases in order to determine whether an inmate has a claim worth pursuing. Prerequisites: Innocence Project Clinic I

  
  • LAW 788 - Appellate & Supreme Court Clinic I


    Fall 3 Tillman Breckenridge

    This clinic will introduce eight students to appellate practice in the federal Courts of Appeals and the United States Supreme Court. Students will work as a team to identify cases suitable for the clinic and then work as pairs to prepare appellate briefs in cases involving the First and Fourth Amendments. In Clinic matters, students will prepare briefs on the merits, amicus briefs, petitions for rehearing or certiorari, appendices, and other appellate filings. For cases in the federal courts of appeals, students will present oral argument when the court allows. Classes will meet every week for general instruction on appellate practice and to discuss draft briefs, petitions, and issues that have arisen in the Clinic’s cases. Students will be graded based on the quality of their written product, and when appropriate, oral argument, as well as their level of effort and participation in preparing ancillary appellate materials such as appendices and filing documents. Students will interview for admission into the Clinic with Richmond attorney, Tillman Breckenridge, and there will be a preference for students who have taken Federal Courts or the Appellate Advocacy Track of the Legal Practice Program, though neither is a prerequisite. Graded course. Appellate and Supreme Court Clinic II will be offered in the spring semester for those who choose to enroll and have successfully complete Appellate and Supreme Court Clinic I. Graded course. IMPORTANT!! Participation in this clinic is by application and selection by the professor. To apply, send your resume, transcript and writing sample electronically to Professor Breckenridge at tbreckenridge@baileyglasser.com. Applications will be accepted in early March each year (be on the lookout for the application due date in the Docket Digest), and interviews by Skype or in person will be held in late March. Please note that preference will be given to those students who intend to take Appellate & Supreme Court Clinic II, to be offered in the spring as a three credit graded course, following successful completion of Appellate Clinic I. Clinic is limited to 3Ls and has an enrollment cap of 8 students. To receive credit for this course, each student MUST attend the first meeting.

  
  • LAW 789 - Appellate & Supreme Court Clinic II


    Spring 3 Tillman Breckenridge Prerequisite(s): LAW 788

    Appellate Clinic II will continue the work of Appellate Clinic I, introducing eight students to a more in-depth look at appellate practice in the federal Courts of Appeals and the United States Supreme Court. Students will continue to work as a team to identify cases suitable for the clinic and work as pairs to prepare appellate briefs in cases involving the First and Fourth Amendments. Students will be graded based on the quality of their written product, and when appropriate, oral argument, as well as their level of effort and participation in preparing ancillary appellate materials such as appendices and filing documents. Successful completion of Appellate Clinic I is a prerequisite. Graded course.

  
  • LAW 790 - Special Education Advocacy Clinic II


    Fall/Spring 3 Christina Jones Prerequisite(s): LAW 782

    Open to 2Ls and 3Ls, the Special Education Advocacy Clinic (PELE) II is an andvanced clinical experience for up to four students. Students will refine their own advocacy skills by continuing work on their cases, as well as build their leadership, supervision and collaborative skills by mentoring PELE Clinic I students. Taught by Professor Crystal Shin. PELE I is a prerequisite. Graded course. Class time TBD based on student schedules.

  
  • LAW 791 - Virginia Coastal Policy Practicum II


    Fall/Spring 3 Elizabeth Andrews Prerequisite(s): OR LAW 679 OR LAW 424

    Open to 2Ls and 3Ls, the Virginia Coastal Policy Practicum II allows up to four students the opportunity to work on advanced projects in support of the Virginia Coastal Policy Center. The advanced practicum will be taught by Professor Elizabeth Andrews. VCPC Practicum I, or Climate Change, or Environmental Law is a pre-requisite. Graded course. Class time will be set according to class members’ schedules at the start of the semester.

  
  • LAW 792 - CorpSec, Counterintel, Counterespionage,&the Insider Threat


    Fall (1-3) Robert Trono

    In an evolving global trade environment, corporate America is becoming an increasingly hot target for economic and industrial espionage. Intelligence collectors come from a variety of sources including foreign nation states, industry competitors, and trusted insiders. This course will illustrate this aggressive threat landscape and thoroughly review how intellectual property has emerged as a coveted target for adversaries and the impact those losses have on economic and national security. One of the most potentially damaging actors to both government and private industry comes from the insider threat. This course will delve into the insider threat phenomenon to understand motivating factors, behavioral indicators, and organizational circumstances which contributed to an insider’s success. The course will examine Edward Snowden as a case study of insider threat activity and lessons learned in the aftermath of his actions. The course will discuss the many challenges faced by counterintelligence, both in government agencies and the private sector. This includes fundamental issues such as information sharing between public and private sectors, growth in offensive technological advancements, and effective employee screening. As theft of U.S. innovation continues to grow at an alarming rate, many companies have implemented counterintelligence and insider threat mitigation measures within their business framework. The course will also examine the vast legal and regulatory requirements associated to these measures, such as program oversight, employee privacy, program transparency, and prosecutorial authorities. The course will analyze Federal statutes covering economic espionage and theft of trade secrets, the Presidential Executive Order on the Insider Threat and the National Industrial Security Program. The grade will be pass/fail based on a final paper.

  
  • LAW 794 - Corporate Counsel - Legal Issues and Practice Difficulties


    Spring (1-3) Sharon Owlett Prerequisite(s): LAW 303 OR LAW 320

    The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to the critical and strategic analysis required to run a successful in-house practice. Students will review problem scenarios in five different areas of corporate operations: management structure, contracts, employment, business integration, and audit. Through analysis and discussion of relevant documents and facts, students will gain an understanding of the multiple and often conflicting considerations that general counsel must weigh and balance in order to provide effective representation. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify stakeholders in corporate interactions and their various interests; be alert to pitfalls impacting counsel’s ability to operate; have a basic understanding of fact-finding within the corporate environment; and gain appreciation of counsel’s role in advising executives, board members and employees as well as in dealing with external parties such as auditors and outside counsel. Students will be evaluated on a legal and business analysis of a contract problem involving multiple tiers. The grade will be pass/fail based on a final paper. Completion of Corporations or Business Associations is a prerequisite.

  
  • LAW 797 - War Powers - The National Security Law Constitution


    Spring 3 Mark Newcomb

    This course will examine the distribution of national security powers amongst the three coordinate branches of government and the development of law and policy governing use of force, military operations, homeland security, intelligence collection, protection of national security information, foreign intelligence surveillance, and contemporary issues in the national security arena. The class is lecture and discussion based, with reading from the Dycus, Berney, Banks & Raven-Hansen’s NATIONAL SECURITY LAW; supplemental materials will be assigned and distributed as appropriate. This class will be graded by an examination (80%) and class participation (20%).

  
  • LAW 798 - Puller Veterans Clinic - Military Sexual Trauma (MST)


    Fall/Spring 3 Elizabeth Tarloski

    Open to 2Ls and 3Ls, the Puller Veterans Clinic - Military Sexual Trauma (MST) offers students the opportunity to learn veterans’ disability law and procedure and aid military veterans who are survivors of military sexual assault in the filing, adjudication, and appeal of their disability claims with the VA. In addition, legislative and policy issues will be explored, with students proposing systemic change through legislative and regulatory reforms. Students will also be engaged in the study of the psychological impact of trauma. The course will be taught by Professor Liz Tarloski. There is a required day-long Boot Camp on Friday, August 25th. Graded course.


Mathematics

  
  • MATH 503 - Intermediate Analysis


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Sequences and series of functions; analysis in metric spaces and normed linear spaces; general integration and differentiation theory.

  
  • MATH 505 - Complex Analysis


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    The complex plane, analytic functions, Cauchy Integral Theorem and the calculus of residues. Taylor and Laurent series, analytic continuation.

  
  • MATH 508 - Advanced Linear Algebra


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Eigenvalues, singular values, matrix factorizations, canonical forms, vector and matrix norms; positive definite, hermitian, unitary and nonnegative matrices.

  
  • MATH 509 - Probability and Statistics for Teachers


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    An introduction to probability, descriptive statistics, and data analysis; exploration of randomness, data representation and modeling. Descriptive statistics will include measures of central tendency, dispersion, distributions, and regression. Methods of reliable data gathering. First approaches to statistical inference. A basic course for preparation of K-8 Mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 510 - Special Topics in Mathematics


    Fall and Spring (1-3)

    A treatment of topics of interest not routinely covered by existing courses. Material may be chosen from topology, algebra, differential equations and various other areas of pure and applied mathematics. This course may be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.

  
  • MATH 512 - Introduction to Number Theory


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    An elementary course in the theory of integers, divisibility and prime numbers, a study of Diophantine equations, congruences, number-theoretic functions, decimal expansion of rational numbers and quadratic residues.

  
  • MATH 513 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis I


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    A discussion of the mathematical theory underlying selected numerical methods and the application of those methods to solving problems of practical importance. Computer programs are used to facilitate calculations. The topics covered are: roots of equations, systems of linear equations, interpolation and approximation, and numerical integration. Students planning to take MATH 514  are strongly encouraged to take MATH 513 first.

  
  • MATH 514 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis II


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    A discussion of the mathematical theory underlying selected numerical methods and the application of those methods to solving problems of practical importance. Computer programs are used to facilitate calculations. The topics covered are: iterative methods for linear systems, eigenvalue computations and differential equations. Students planning to take MATH 514 are strongly encouraged to take MATH 513  first.

  
  • MATH 516 - Geometry and Measurement for Teachers


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Explorations of the foundations of informal measurement and geometry in one, two, and three dimensions. The van Hiele model for geometric learning is used as a framework for how children build their understanding of length, area, volume, angles, and geometric relationships. Visualization, spatial reasoning, and geometric modeling are stressed. As appropriate, transformational geometry, congruence, similarity, and geometric constructions will be discussed. A basic course for preparation of K-8 Mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 517 - Vector Calculus for Scientists


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Directional derivatives, differential forms and the Poincaré lemma, chain rule; Jacobians, change of variable and application to Lagrangian mechanics; path integrals and the deformation theorem, surface integrals and Stokes’ theorem. Additional topics will be covered if time permits.

  
  • MATH 524 - Operations Research: Stochastic Models


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    A survey of probabilistic operations research models and applications. Topics include stochastic processes, Markov chains, queuing theory and applications, Markovian decision processes, inventory theory and decision analysis.

  
  • MATH 528 - Functional Analysis


    Spring of odd-numbered years 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Introduction to the geometry of Hilbert spaces, bounded linear operators, compact operators, spectral theory of compact selfadjoint operators, integral operators and other applications.

  
  • MATH 535 - Numbers and Number Sense


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Basic number strands in fractions and rational numbers, decimals and percents; ratios and proportions in the school curriculum. Interpretations, computations, and estimation with a coordinated program of activities that develop both rational number concepts and skills and proportional reasoning. A basic course for preparation of K-8 Mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 536 - Functions and Algebra for Teachers


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Examination of representation and analysis of mathematical situations and structures using generalization and algebraic symbols and reasoning. Attention will be given to the transition from arithmetic to algebra, working with quantitative change, and the description of a prediction of change. A basic course for preparation of K-8 Mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 537 - Rational Numbers and Proportional Reasoning


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    In this class students explore the conceptual and procedural basis of rational numbers including fractions, percents, and decimals. The essential role that proportional reasoning plays in higher mathematics is discussed. The logic and interpretations of order, operations, and algorithms are investigated using visual and physical representations. A basic course for preparation of K-8 Mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 538 - Algebra, Functions and Data Analysis


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    In this class, students explore the use of mathematics as an analytical tool in applied problems including those with practical and/or scientific settings. Algebraic methods will be applied to problems of coding, growth and decay and probability theory. Elements of statistical analysis of experimental data will also be discussed. This course is designed for secondary mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 539 - Discrete Mathematics


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Topics for discussion in this class will include graph theory, linear programming, identification numbers and check digits, and recursion formulas. Time permitting, symmetry and tilings will also be considered. This course is designed for middle and high school mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 541 - Introduction to Applied Mathematics I


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    A study of mathematical principles and techniques common to different scientific disciplines. The central topics are differential and matrix equations. Beginning with symmetric linear systems and associated matrix theory, the course continues with equilibrium equations, least squares estimation, vector calculus, calculus of variations, Fourier series and complex variables. Applications to structures, electrical networks, data analysis, etc. are included.

  
  • MATH 542 - Introduction to Applied Mathematics II


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): MATH 541  or Consent of instructor.

    A continuation of Mathematics 541. Topics are numerical methods for linear and nonlinear equations and eigensystems, finite elements, initial-value problems with introduction to the phase plane and chaos, stability analysis, network flows and optimization. Applications to simple fluid flow, heat transfer, assignment and transportation problems, etc. are included.

  
  • MATH 543 - Exploring Algebra and Trigonometry


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Students will examine polynomial, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions as precursors to their use in calculus. Graphical analysis of these functions and its relationship to the solution of non-linear equations will be considered. Applications to science and engineering will be included. This course is designed for secondary mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 544 - Exploring Calculus


    Summer 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Students will study the role of limiting processes in the analysis of the standard functions that arise in applied mathematics. Differentiation and integration of polynomials, exponentials and logarithms will be considered. Geometric implications of the methods will be a central topic in this study. Applications from science, economics and finance will be included. This course is designed for secondary mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 550 - Modeling and Computer Programming


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    In this class, students will examine mathematical models of a variety of scientific, engineering and economic regimes. As the need arises, computer processing will be employed to demonstrate the implications of these models. Microsoft Excel is a likely choice for the computing language. This course is designed for secondary mathematics teachers.

  
  • MATH 551 - Probability


    Fall and Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

    Topics include: combinational analysis, discrete and continuous probability distributions and characteristics of distributions, sampling distributions.

 

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