Mar 02, 2024  
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Explanation of Course Descriptions

Graduate courses may be taken by persons other than regular or provisional graduate students in Arts and Sciences only with the consent of the chairperson of the department/program committee concerned.

Pairs of numbers (501,502) indicate continuous courses. A hyphen between numbers (501-502) indicates that the courses must be taken in the succession stated.

Courses involving laboratory or studio activity are so labeled. All others are classroom courses.

Semester hour credit for each course is indicated by numbers in parentheses.

 

 

Physics

  
  • PHYS 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring 0-2 Nelson. Graded Pass/Fail.

    Includes presentations by invited speakers on areas of active research in physics. The course also will include an overview of physics research at William and Mary and training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research.  No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course may be repeated.

  
  • PHYS 690 - Advanced Topics in Physics


    Fall and Spring Hours and credits to be arranged. Staff.

    Special topics of current interest. This course may be repeated for credit when the instructor determines there will not be a duplication of material.

  
  • PHYS 694 - Directed Research Topics


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Armstrong.

    Students design and conduct research on a relevant topic with a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 12 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements.

  
  • PHYS 702 - Advanced Mathematical Physics


    Spring 3 Staff. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 603 .

    Differential equations, Green’s functions, some hypergeometric functions, group theory, representation of groups. 

  
  • PHYS 721 - Quantum Field Theory - I


    Fall 3 Dudek. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 622 .

    Canonical quantization of scalar, spinor and vector fields; interacting field theories and Feynman diagrams; scattering theory; quantum electrodynamics and introduction to radiative corrections.

  
  • PHYS 722 - Quantum Field Theory - II


    Spring 3 Carlson. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 721 .

    Functional integral quantization of field theories. Renormalization. Quantization of gauge theories. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking and the Higgs mechanism.

  
  • PHYS 741 - Condensed Matter Physics


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): PHYS 622 , PHYS 630 .

    Introduction to the frontiers of condensed matter physics research; crystal structure, phonons, electrons, electric, optical, and magnetic properties, impurities, elementary excitations, band theory and experimental methods.

  
  • PHYS 742 - Advanced Condensed Matter Physics


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): PHYS 741  

    Selected topics from the frontiers of condensed matter physics research that may include semiconductors, magnetism, superconductivity, topological states of quantum matter.  Discussions of modern experimental and theoretical methods.

  
  • PHYS 761 - Atomic and Molecular Processes


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 622 .

    Theory of atomic structure; emission and absorption of radiation; fine and hyperfine structure; coupling schemes. Molecular structure and intermolecular forces; atomic and molecular collisions. Modern applications.  

  
  • PHYS 762 - Atomic and Molecular Processes


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 622 .

    Theory of atomic structure; emission and absorption of radiation; fine and hyperfine structure; coupling schemes. Molecular structure and intermolecular forces; atomic and molecular collisions. Modern applications. 

  
  • PHYS 766 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring (1-12) Armstrong. Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements.  This course may be repeated.

  
  • PHYS 772 - The Standard Model of Particle Physics


    Spring 3 Orginos. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 721  .

    Gauge theory. Electroweak interactions and unification. Quantum Chromodynamics. Particle phenomenology.

  
  • PHYS 773 - Topics in Nuclear and Particle Physics


    Fall 3 Stevens. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 772 .

    Topics of current interest in strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. This course may be repeated for credit when the instructor determines there will not be duplication of material.

  
  • PHYS 783 - Plasma Physics


    Fall 3 Staff.

    An introduction to plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics. Particle orbit theory, macroscopic equations, waves in collisional and collisionless plasmas. Vlasov equation. 

  
  • PHYS 784 - Advanced Plasma Physics


    Spring 3 Staff. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 783 .

    Selected topics such as plasma waves in a magnetic field, waves in a bounded plasma, plasma kinetic theory, and plasma radiation. 

  
  • PHYS 786 - General Relativity and Cosmology


    Spring 3 Staff.

    Introduction to general relativity, tensor analysis, gravitational field equations, gravitational waves, Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions, cosmological models, gravitational collapse.

  
  • PHYS 790 - Advanced Topics in Physics


    Fall and Spring Hours and credits to be arranged. Staff.

    Special topics of current interest. This course may be repeated for credit when the instructor determines there will not be a duplication of material.

  
  • PHYS 795 - Directed Dissertation Research


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 12 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.

  
  • PHYS 800 - Dissertation


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Tracy. Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.  Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.


Psychology

  
  • PSYC 500 - Topics in Psychology


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff.

    Course concerning special topics not covered in detail in regular course offerings. This course may be repeated for credit when the instructor determines there will be no duplication of material.

  
  • PSYC 566 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring variable 3-4 credits Graded Pass/Fail

    No credit earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • PSYC 618 - Professional Development Seminar


    Fall 2 Dallaire.

    This course will foster the professional development of our M.A. students by holding weekly seminars over the first two semesters of the M.A. program. They will consist of readings and discussions of philosophy of science, research methodology and design, research ethics including fabrication, falsification and plagiarism, critical analysis of published studies, research presentation and applying to Ph.D. programs.

  
  • PSYC 619 - Professional Development Seminar


    Spring 2 Dallaire.

    This course will foster the professional development of our M.A. students by holding weekly seminars over the first two semesters of the M.A. program. They will consist of readings and discussions of philosophy of science, research methodology and design, research ethics including fabrication, falsification and plagiarism, critical analysis of published studies, research presentation and applying to Ph.D. programs.
     

  
  • PSYC 631 - Advanced Statistics I


    Fall 3 Kirkpatrick, Staff. Corequisite(s): PSYC 631L .

    The first part of the advanced two-course statistics sequence covering topics from basic descriptive and inferential statistics through multiple regression, analysis of variance, and the general linear model.

  
  • PSYC 631L - Advanced Statistics I Laboratory


    Fall 0 Kirkpatrick. Corequisite(s):   

  
  • PSYC 632 - Research Methods


    Fall 3 Vishton, Staff.

    This course provides in-depth coverage of experimental and correlational approaches to quantitative research. A primary aim is to facilitate publication in respected journals by helping students to anticipate the kinds of critiques likely to arise during the peer-review process. Topics include hypotheses, theory, and meta-theory; assessment; psychometrics; causal inference; threats to internal/external validity; experimental and statistical controls; strengths and weaknesses of particular cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental designs; and acceptance criteria of peer-reviewed journals.

  
  • PSYC 633 - Advanced Statistics II


    Spring 3 Kirkpatrick, Staff. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 631  Corequisite(s): PSYC 633L .

    The second part of the advanced two-course statistics sequence covering topics from basic descriptive and inferential statistics through multiple regression, analysis of variance, and the general linear model.

  
  • PSYC 633L - Advanced Statistics II Laboratory.


    Spring 0 Kirkpatrick, Staff. Corequisite(s): PSYC 633 .

  
  • PSYC 660 - Proseminar in Developmental Psychology


    Fall 3 Dallaire, Zeman, Staff. Prerequisite(s): An overview of seminal and current theoretical and empirical work in developmental science in the domains of cognitive, linguistic, moral, social, and emotional development.

  
  • PSYC 661 - Proseminar in Cognition


    Spring 3 Ball, Kieffaber, Stevens, Staff. Prerequisite(s): Review of theoretical and empirical investigations of major topics in the field of cognition including perception, attention, memory, language, reasoning, decision making, problem solving, cognitive neuroscience, and applied cognitive psychology.

  
  • PSYC 662 - Proseminar in Personality.


    Fall 3 Thrash, Staff.

    This course provides an overview of historical and contemporary developments in the field of personality psychology, which encompasses individual differences, intrapsychic factors responsible for those differences, within-person processes, and the interface between the person and the social environment. Topics include personality traits, motives/goals, implicit/explicit processes, authenticity, emotion/affect, and well-being.

  
  • PSYC 663 - Proseminar in Behavioral Neuroscience


    Spring 3 Burk, Staff. Prerequisite(s): The study of behavior in the context of the physiology of the organism. Selected topics will be used to illustrate the research techniques and investigative procedures commonly employed by physiological psychologists.

  
  • PSYC 664 - Proseminar in Social Psychology


    Fall 3 Dickter, Staff.

    A survey of classic and contemporary theory and research in social psychology. Topics include social cognition, interpersonal relationships, attitudes, emotions, group performance, the self, and stereotyping.

  
  • PSYC 668 - Proseminar in Clinical Psychology


    Spring 3 Nichols, Shean, Ventis, Zeman

    Selected topics in clinical psychology, theory, research, and practice.

  
  • PSYC 671 - Statistical Modeling


    Spring 3 Thrash, Staff.

    This course provides an introduction to advanced statistical modeling techniques. Primary objectives of this course are (1) to provide a big-picture overview of diverse statistical modeling techniques (e.g., multiple regression, mediation/path models, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, multilevel modeling, cluster analysis) and their applications; (2) to provide a thorough introduction to structural equation modeling; and (3) to show how structural equation modeling encompasses and extends a variety of other statistical techniques.

  
  • PSYC 672 - Computer Applications in Psychological Science


    Fall 3 Kieffaber, Staff.

    Computer proficiency is essential for anyone involved in the psychological sciences. This course will review a variety of software applications in the context of the professional activities of psychological scientists. Topics will include APA-style document processing, reference management, basic programming concepts and computer-assisted acquisition of research data, data management, and statistical analysis.

  
  • PSYC 674 - Applied Decision Theory


    Spring 3 Langholtz, Staff

    The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with applied techniques for decision making, and to explain decisions as cognitive processes. Decision-making will be explored in terms of both psychological theory and real-world applications.

  
  • PSYC 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring (variable 0-2) Dallaire. Graded Pass/Fail.

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course may be repeated.

  
  • PSYC 690 - Directed Readings


    Fall and Spring 1-3 Dallaire.

    Credit will be from one to three hours depending upon work undertaken. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • PSYC 693 - Introduction to Graduate Research


    Fall and Spring (3 or 6) Staff.

    This course introduces students to graduate research. Students design and conduct research with a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated once, only for 3 semester credit hours, and only if no more than 3 semester credit hours have been earned already for 693.

  
  • PSYC 700 - Thesis


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Dallaire. Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.  Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a master’s thesis.


Public Policy

  
  • PUBP 500 - Mathematics for Public Policy Analysis


    Fall 1 McBeth. Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): College-level algebra.

    An introduction to mathematical methods applied to economics and policy analysis. The emphasis is on learning the techniques rather than proving theorems. Topics include: linear algebra, comparative static analysis, and optimization problems.

  
  • PUBP 514 - Topics in Public Policy


    Fall and Spring (1-3) Staff. Graded Pass/fail.

    Topics change each semester.  Please consult Open Course List for the current listing of topics offered. This course may be repated for 6 credits.

  
  • PUBP 566 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirments. This course may be repeated.

  
  • PUBP 590 - Policy in Practice


    Spring 1 McBeth. Graded Pass/Fail.

    An introduction to the practice of public policy. Students must complete a portfolio of experiences involving the practice of public policy outside of the classroom. A passing grade requires that the portfolio contain a written synthesis of the student’s observations of policy in practice and how their experiences have shaped their views on public policy. Those experiences must include, at a minimum, the following three elements: (1) participation in the Washington Program, normally in the fall of the first year of study; (2) completion of an approved 10-week full-time internship, normally occurring between the first and second year of study; and (3) participation in at least three Policy Dialogues offered by the program.

  
  • PUBP 600 - Independent Study


    Fall and Spring Variable credit, 1 to 3 credits Staff. Graded Pass/Fail or letter graded.

    Course content varies: special topics courses; independent supervised research; experimentation with new seminars. This course may be repeated for 6 credits.

  
  • PUBP 601 - The Political Environment


    Fall 3 Gilmour, Tierney

    An introduction to the political environment in which policy making occurs. Major themes include the impact of electoral incentives on the design of policy instruments, the importance of institutional structure, and the roles played by uncertainty and expertise in the political process. Sections will focus either on the U.S. Political Environment or Comparative Political Environments.

  
  • PUBP 602 - Quantitative Methods I


    Fall 3 Manna.

    An introduction to the methods and techniques of statistical analysis with emphasis on public policy applications. Topics include: descriptive statistics; probability; sampling; survey design; hypothesis testing; correlation; regression; and introduction to multiple regression. This course includes training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research, including discussions of the proper use of data and reporting of results in order to avoid fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism.

  
  • PUBP 603 - Quantitative Methods II


    Spring 3 He. Prerequisite(s): PUBP 602 .

    An introduction to theory and practice of econometrics with emphasis on techniques most useful to policy analysts. Topics include: regression estimation and the theory of least squares including examination of Gauss-Markov assumptions, properties of estimators, and estimation issues when Gauss-Markov assumptions are violated.

  
  • PUBP 604 - Microeconomics of Public Policy


    Fall 3 Sanders.

    This course develops basic concepts of microeconomic theory, with an emphasis on the economics of the public sector. Topics include: market economy, prisoner’s dilemma, preferences, constrained choice, consumer demand, profit maximization in a competitive market, market failure, and the effects of taxes, subsidies, and regulations.

  
  • PUBP 605 - Macroeconomics for Public Policy


    Spring 3 Schreiber. Graded Pass/Fail. Note: PUBP 605 and PUBP 651 can be taken instead of PUBP 606

    This course provides a broad based-based understanding of macroeconomic concepts and an introduction to the tools of global macroeconomic policy analysis.  It starts with the role of government policy in promoting long-term growth. In addition, the focus lies on the role of fiscal, monetary, and exchange rate policies in both developed and developing countries.  The impact of policies is studied both domestically and internationally with emphasis on the interdependence and global repercussions of specific policy choices.

  
  • PUBP 606 - Benefit-Cost Analysis


    Spring 3 McInerney. Note: PUBP 605 and PUBP 651 may be taken instead of PUBP 606

    This course examines basic concepts and techniques involved with benefit-cost analysis. This approach will be applied to a variety of public policy issues and programs. Topics include: choice of discount rate, treatment of income distribution, intergovernmental grants, tax expenditures, regulation, and program evaluation.

  
  • PUBP 607 - Law and Public Policy


    Fall 3 Byrne, Heller, Staff.

    Law and Public Policy examines the role of the judiciary as a policy-making institution, including its interactions with legislative, regulatory, and private-sector entities. Students analyze several cases currently before the United States Supreme Court and, through the prism of those cases and other readings, explore the concepts of judicial review, separation of powers, and federalism, and also external influences on law-making bodies, including lobbying, public opinion, and the media. Sections will focus either on the U.S. Legal System or Comparative Legal Systems.

  
  • PUBP 608 - Budget Policy-Making


    Fall 3 Gilmour, Howard.

    An introduction to public budgeting at the national, state, and local levels, presented from three perspectives: macroeconomics, political science, and public administration. Emphasis is also given to the budgetary strategies employed by bureaucrats, politicians, and interest group representatives as they pursue their policy agendas.

  
  • PUBP 609 - Ethics and Public Policy


    Spring 3 Staff.

    This course examines the ethical dimensions of domestic and international policy problems. It contrasts moral policy-assessment with economic, legal and political analysis; outlines a policy-making procedure that includes moral assessment; considers a code of professional ethics.

  
  • PUBP 610 - Policy Research Seminar


    Fall 3 Stafford.

    This one semester research and writing intensive seminar involves both the further development of policy research skills and communication skills relevant to policy-making. Students will be involved in small-group, client-driven policy analysis projects and an individual project. In addition, students will analyze at least one quick-turnaround policy problem.

  
  • PUBP 612 - Public Management and Organizational Behavior


    Fall 3 Staff.

    An examination of the ways in which public organizations and their leaders cope with the policy and management challenges that confront administrative agencies in a democratic society. Theoretical literature as well as case studies will be utilized.

  
  • PUBP 613 - Non-Profit Management


    Spring (3) Joosse.

    An examination of policy environment, funding constraints, and other management issues facing non-profit organizations and their leaders.  Theoretical literature as well as case studies will be utilized.

  
  • PUBP 614 - Topics in Public Policy


    Fall and Spring 3 Staff.

    Topics change each semester. Please consult the Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy web site for the current listing of topics offered. This course may be repeated for credit if there is no duplication of topic.

  
  • PUBP 615 - Cross Section Econometrics


    Fall 3 Hicks. Prerequisite(s): PUBP 603 .

    Economic data often come as a cross-section of data points, frequently collected as part of a sample survey. The nature of these data calls for the use of a specialized set of tools, which will be developed in the course. Among the models to be examined are discrete, censored and truncated dependent variable, sample selectivity and duration models. Hands-on analysis of data sets will feature prominently.

  
  • PUBP 616 - Time Series Econometrics


    Spring 3 Moody. Prerequisite(s): PUBP 603 .

    This course is an introduction to the econometric analysis of time series data. Topics include ARIMA models, forecasting, analysis of nonstationary series, unit root tests, co-integration and principles of modeling.

  
  • PUBP 617 - Survey Methodology


    Spring 3 Staff.

    An introduction to the formulation, implementation and analysis of political and public policy surveys. Topics to be covered include the psychology of the survey response, sampling, interviewing, focus groups, experimental design, hypothesis testing and data analysis. Students will carry out individually designed and group designed surveys, and write papers and reports around these projects.

  
  • PUBP 620 - Regulation of Markets


    Spring 3 Parman, Stafford.

    An in-depth study of government intervention in markets. Principal focus on characteristics and effects of rules and institutions governing markets and the definition of areas of market failure. Topics include: regulation of monopoly, antitrust enforcement, and regulation of spill-overs.

  
  • PUBP 621 - Administrative Law


    Fall 3 Devins.

    A study of practice in the administrative process, examining the procedures for administrative adjudication and rulemaking; legislative and judicial control of administrative action; and public access to governmental processes and information. Cross-listed with [LAW 453 ]

  
  • PUBP 622 - Environmental Policy


    Fall 3 Hicks.

    This course explores policy making for environmental problems and focuses on issues that are local, national, and international. This course will cover the application of welfare economics to environmental problems. Topics include differences in consumer surplus and other measures of economic welfare and techniques to measure the economic value of environmental resources. We examine national environmental policy, and how that policy is implemented at a local and regional level. We examine the U.S. laws and regulations as well as each agency’s approach for quantitatively assessing the benefits and costs of environmental policy.

  
  • PUBP 623 - Health Care Policy


    Fall 3 Rossiter, Mellor.

    The application of microeconomic theory, quantitative analysis, and policy evaluation to the health care delivery and financing systems. Coverage includes the economic dimensions of health care, health status, medical manpower, hospitals and other institutional providers, third party financing, quality assessment, systematic analysis, and national health policies.

  
  • PUBP 624 - Law and Medicine Seminar


    Spring 3 Hubbard.

    A study of medical jurisprudence and hospital law focusing on medical malpractice and tort law reform and contemporary problems including the regulation of health care delivery systems, access to health care, and antitrust challenges. Cross-listed with [LAW 518]

  
  • PUBP 626 - Law and Resource Management


    Spring 3 Taylor.

    An interdisciplinary course designed to examine the interrelationships between scientific and legal concepts. Issues, legislation, and institutions associated with coastal zone management, outer continental shelf development, fisheries, and other questions related to marine resource management will be examined. Cross-listed with [MSCI 543]

  
  • PUBP 627 - Law, Policy and Environment


    Spring 3 Malone.

    A study of the environmental policy-making process. Topics include: ecological and economic foundations of environmentalism, traditional institutional responses, the policy-making process in the context of our legal system, constitutional questions raised by judicial and agency involvement, and economic, political and ethical concerns raised by different theories of environmental decision-making. Cross-listed with [LAW 439]

  
  • PUBP 628 - Environmental Law


    Spring 3 Malone, Rosenberg.

    A study of nature and causes of environmental pollution and legal techniques for its control. The course considers common law, environmental impact assessment process, and basic regulatory framework for air, water and solid hazardous waste control, and main policy issues presented by each. Other: role of federal courts in reviewing agency action, new developments in administrative law, natural resource management and allocation issues, toxic and hazardous substance regulation, and enforcement of laws. Cross-listed with [LAW 424 ]

  
  • PUBP 630 - The Economics of Policy-Making at the State and Local Level


    Fall 3 McInerney.

    A topics course including, but not limited to, the measurement of state and local fiscal capacity, urban problems, urban infrastructure development, intergovernmental aid to localities, industrial location decisions, and local land use policy and its impact on growth and development.

  
  • PUBP 631 - State and Local Politics and Policy-Making


    Spring 3 Howard, McGlennon.

    This course examines the nature of state and local governments and their policy processes and outcomes, including relationships among levels of government, explanations for policy variations among states and localities, and constraints on attempts to deal with their public policy responsibilities.

  
  • PUBP 632 - Local Government Law


    Spring 3 Rosenberg.

    This course examines local government powers and relation to state and federal authority with emphasis on state and federal statutory and constitutional restraints on operation of local government entities. Topics include: Dillon’s Rule, home rule, preemption, annexation, personnel matters, public contracts, borrowing and taxation, and public entity tort liability and immunity. Cross-listed with [LAW 429 ]

  
  • PUBP 633 - Land Use Control


    Spring 3 Butler, Rosenberg.

    Analysis of legal doctrines governing use of land in modern society. Topics include: zoning, land planning, sub-division regulations, rezoning, variances, conditional uses, and mandatory dedications, common law doctrines and private law methods which affect land use, and historic preservation as a land use problem. Cross-listed with [LAW 425 ]

  
  • PUBP 635 - Fundamentals of Environmental Science for Policy


    Fall 3 Taylor.

    This course is intended primarily for students in Law, Public Policy and related disciplines, and is designed to introduce these students to the science of natural systems and ecological processes. The course examines the current state of our understanding in terms that will give the student confidence and the facility to critically assess theories and observations in environmental science. With this as a foundation, topics discussed will include: the enhanced greenhouse effect, coastal eutrophication, biodiversity loss, water resources, sea level rise, environmental contamination, land use trends, and invasive species impacts.

  
  • PUBP 640 - Labor Market Policy


    Spring 3 McHenry.

    This course examines how public policies affect the labor market. Topics include: wage determination, education, training, minimum wages, immigration, unemployment compensation, social security, disability insurance, comparable worth, workplace safety, welfare reform, and affirmative action.

  
  • PUBP 642 - Legal Foundations of American Social Programs


    Spring 3 Staff.

    This course examines law relating to major benefits programs, including social security, medicare/medicaid, unemployment, employee rehabilitation, AFDC, and Food Stamps, including decision-making processes used in governance of these programs and the basic substantive law created for and by these programs. Cross-listed with [LAW 430]

  
  • PUBP 643 - Employment Discrimination


    Spring 3 Grover.

    A study of federal laws prohibiting discrimination in employment on account of race, national origin, gender, religion and handicapping condition, with emphasis on Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and the Equal Pay Act. Cross-listed with [LAW 452 ]

  
  • PUBP 644 - The Financing of Higher Education


    Fall 3 Eddy, Finnegan.

    An overview of the financing of higher education. Besides becoming acquainted with the literature and main issues in finance, students will develop the ability to examine and analyze financial statements, assess the budget as an instrument of control, and relate the budget to the educational program. Cross-listed with [EPPL 676 ]

  
  • PUBP 645 - Higher Education and Public Policy


    Spring 3 Staff.

    A seminar for advanced graduate students in which the general topic of the relationship between the government and higher education is developed. Major attention is given to developments since World War II. Cross-listed with [EPPL 713 ]

  
  • PUBP 646 - Employment Law


    Fall 3 Abel, Douglas.

    This course will focus on a variety of common law and statutory legal issues surrounding the employer-employee relationship. Issues considered will include employment at-will, employee privacy, covenants not to compete, regulation of wages and hours, ERISA, worker’s compensation, occupational health and safety, and unemployment compensation. This course will not overlap either LAW 452 - Employment Discrimination  or LAW 407 - Labor Law  Cross-listed with [LAW 456 ]

  
  • PUBP 650 - International Trade: Theory and Policy


    Spring 3 Feldman, Lopresti.

    Trade influences national income, resource allocation, and the distribution of income. We use economic theory to develop these ideas and to relate them to the public policy debate. Topics include: the economics of protectionism, industrial policy and strategic trade issues, regional integration, and the policymaking process itself.

  
  • PUBP 651 - International Development and Policy


    Spring 3 BenYishay Note: PUBP 605 and PUBP 651 can be taken instead of PUBP 606

    This course applies relevant economic theories to the study of growth and structural change in less industrialized countries. Topics include sources of growth, industrialization, trade, income distribution, urbanization, and the state. Various techniques of policy analysis will be examined through selected case studies.

  
  • PUBP 652 - Public International Law


    Fall 3 Malone.

    An examination of the nature and sources of international law and municipal law; the law of treaties; principles of jurisdiction; statehood and recognition of states and governments; sovereign immunity; rights of aliens; human rights; environmental issues; and regulation of international coercion. Cross-listed with [LAW 409 ]

  
  • PUBP 653 - Diplomacy Lab


    Fall and Spring (1 to 3) Staff. Note: Instructor permission required.

    Course for students accepted into the State Department’s Diplomacy Lab program. Separate sections will be offered for each of the Diplomacy Lab projects. 

  
  • PUBP 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring variable 0-2 Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course may be repeated.


School Psychology and Counselor Education (SPACE) and Educational Foundations

  
  • EDUC C28 - Prevention Strategies in Schools and Communities


    (3).

    This course focuses on procedures and techniques for the prevention of and intervention in substance abuse, violence, unwanted pregnancy, school dropout and other behaviors that interfere with academic performance, health and well-being in schools and organizations. Students will acquire knowledge about models of prevention, policies, practices, and resources that are available. Students will also develop beginning prevention skills in working with individuals and groups and in the development and administration of programs.

  
  • EDUC C29 - Substance Abuse and Society


    (3).

    This course examines substance use and abuse in contemporary society. Topics are treated from a multi-disciplinary perspective including biological, social, pharmacological, cultural, psychological, political, economic, and legal aspects of substance abuse. Patterns of addiction, intervention and rehabilitation in respect to substance abuse also are analyzed. Assessments of the costs, options, and alternatives to addiction along with educational efforts toward prevention are examined.

  
  • EDUC C31 - Career Development


    (3).

    A study of the occupational structure of our society, of factors influencing career development, and of techniques for providing educational and occupational information. Both individual and group activities are stressed.

  
  • EDUC C32 - Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy


    (3).

    A study of the major concepts and practices of contemporary therapeutic systems as well as an overview of developmental and psychopathological issues presented by clients.

  
  • EDUC C33 - Techniques of Counseling


    (3). Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

    An intensive study of techniques utilized in individual counseling. Extensive use is made of case data and role playing.

  
  • EDUC C34 - Group Theory and Techniques


    (3).

    Group Theory & Techniques provides both theoretical and experiential understandings of group purpose, development, dynamics, techniques and skills, and various group approaches. The course focuses on helping beginning group leaders apply their new knowledge to working in groups with children, adolescents, and adults across diverse settings. Counseling theories and their application to working with groups are given consideration throughout the course. Through the use of experiential activities, both in and outside the classroom, students will acquire experience in conducting counseling, psychoeducational, and task/work groups.

  
  • EDUC C35 - Introduction to Professional School Counseling


    (3).

    This course is designed to give prospective school counselors: (a) an understanding of the historical impetus which led to the development of counselors and counseling programs in schools; (b) a means to make practical use of the counseling and guidance theories and techniques as they apply in the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) requirements; (c) exposure to administrative activities which provide the framework for school counseling services; (d) prevention and intervention strategies which contribute to students’ academic career, and personal social growth and development; and (e) an understanding of proactive leadership as it relates to student advocacy as well as the challenge of developing new paradigms for the future

  
  • EDUC C42 - Supervised Practicum in Counseling


    (3). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): EDUC C32   EDUC C33  and EDUC C34  

    The Counseling Practicum course is designed to provide students in counseling with their first client contact in a closely supervised setting. It is designed to help students begin to translate their academic understanding into actual counseling practice. Students complete a pre-determined number of hours of individual and group counseling in laboratory and field settings under supervision by doctoral-level Practicum Supervisors, the counseling faculty, and qualified field placement site supervisors.

  
  • EDUC C43 - Professional, Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling


    (3).

    This course will provide students with a foundation in issues that affect the profession of counseling. Students will examine: (1) professional issues, including professional identity, history and systems of counseling, professional organizations, counseling settings and counselor functions, and research issues affecting the conceptual base of the profession, (2) counseling ethics and ethical dilemmas, and (3) legal decisions that affect the practice of counseling. The course will emphasize active student participation in the exploration of these issues.

  
  • EDUC C44 - Addictions Counseling


    (3). Prerequisite(s): EDUC C29  , EDUC C32  , EDUC C33  and EDUC C34  

    This course is designed to cover those counseling theories and techniques utilized with clients suffering from addictions or substance abuse. Treatments will be discussed from the perspective of the medical, recovery, and transpersonal models of addiction.

  
  • EDUC C45 - Transpersonal Counseling: Theory, Research and Practice


    (3).

    This course offers an analysis of the field of transpersonal counseling; theory, research, and practice. The relationship of transpersonal theories to traditional theories will be examined. Special attention will be devoted to the use of transpersonal approaches in addictions counseling and substance abuse prevention.

  
  • EDUC C46 - Contemporary Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling


    (3).

    This course provides counselors who will work as licensed practitioners in clinical mental health settings with an understanding of the historical and philosophical background of clinical mental health counseling. It will cover the forces that influence the development of clinical mental health counseling, the role of the clinical mental health counselor, professional issues unique to clinical mental health counseling, client characteristics, principles of clinical mental health counseling, community needs assessment, and counseling program development.

  
  • EDUC C47 - Internship in Clinical Mental Health Counseling


    (3). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s):  EDUC C32 , EDUC C33 , EDUC C34 , EDUC C42 , and EDUC C43  

    The internship practicum is designed to give students the opportunity to demonstrate and improve their counseling skills in an agency setting. Students complete a minimum of 300 hours of counseling experience in a community agency setting under both university and field supervision. In addition, participation in a weekly group supervision session and an experience log are required.

  
  • EDUC C49 - Supervised Internship in School Counseling


    (3). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s):  

    EDUC C32 , EDUC C33 , EDUC C34 , EDUC C42 , and EDUC C43  

    This counseling internship is designed to give ad­vanced students in counseling the opportunity to put into practice the skills and knowledge they have developed throughout their counseling program. Students complete a minimum of 600 hours of counseling experience in a school setting under both college and field supervision. In addition, participation in a weekly group supervision session on campus is required.

 

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