Mar 02, 2024  
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017 - 2018 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Explanation of Course Descriptions

Graduate courses may be taken by persons other than regular or provisional graduate students in Arts and Sciences only with the consent of the chairperson of the department/program committee concerned.

Pairs of numbers (501,502) indicate continuous courses. A hyphen between numbers (501-502) indicates that the courses must be taken in the succession stated.

Courses involving laboratory or studio activity are so labeled. All others are classroom courses.

Semester hour credit for each course is indicated by numbers in parentheses.

 

 

Chemistry

  
  • CHEM 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring variable 0-2 Graded Pass/Fail

    Each full-time graduate student is required to enroll in this course each semester until classified as a Research Graduate. This course includes training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research, as well as discussions of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course may be repeated.

  
  • CHEM 693 - Introduction to Graduate Research


    Fall and Spring (3 or 6) Staff.

    This course introduces students to graduate research. Students design and conduct research with a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated once, only for 3 semester credit hours, and only if no more than 3 semester credit hours have been earned already for 693.

  
  • CHEM 695 - Directed Thesis Master’s Research


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-9) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty member. This course may be repeated, but no more than 9 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for submitting a master’s thesis.

  
  • CHEM 696 - Summer Graduate Research


    Summer (3) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

    This course may be repeated.

  
  • CHEM 700 - Thesis


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a master’s thesis.


Computer Science

  
  • CSCI 512 - Web Programming


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 421. May be taken for Audit.

    Overview of the Internet. Markup languages: HTML, CSS, XML. Server-side programming languages: Perl/Python, PHP, Java. Other topics include: N-tier programming, security, database access, XML processing.

  
  • CSCI 515 - Systems Programming


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Computer Organization.

    The design and implementation of programs which provide robust and efficient services to users of a computer. Macro processors; scripting languages; graphical interfaces; network programming. Unix and X are emphasized. Cross-listed with [CSCI 415]

  
  • CSCI 520 - Elementary Topics


    Fall or Spring 1, 2, or 3 credits, depending on material

    Will be published in the registration schedule. A treatment of elementary topics of interest not routinely covered by existing courses. Material may be chosen from various areas of computer science. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • CSCI 523 - Finite Automata and Theory of Computation


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Linear Algebra, Algorithms.

    Theory of sequential machines and finite automata. Turing machines, recursive functions, computability of functions.

  
  • CSCI 524 - Computer Architecture


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Computer Organization.

    An introduction to the principles of computer design. Topics include data representation, including adders, signed integer arithmetic, floating point representation and character representation. A study of microprocessor, minicomputer and mainframe architecture including clocks, memory management, bus communication and input/output.

  
  • CSCI 526 - Simulation


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Calculus, Algorithms.

    An introduction to simulation. Discrete and continuous stochastic models, random number generation, elementary statistics, simulation of queuing and inventory systems, Monte Carlo simulation, point and interval parameter estimation. Selected applications.

  
  • CSCI 527 - Computer Graphics


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Linear Algebra, Algorithms, Computer Organization.

    An introduction to computer graphics and its applications. Topics include coordinate systems, the relationship between continuous objects and discrete displays, fill and flood algorithms, two-dimensional geometric transformations, clipping, zooming, panning, and windowing. Topics from three-dimensional graphics include representations for objects, geometric and projection transformations, geometric modeling, and hidden line/surface removal algorithms.

  
  • CSCI 530 - Computer Languages


    Fall and Spring 1 or 2 credits, depending on material Prerequisite(s): Will be published in the preregistration schedule.

    Topics include syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of one computer language as well as aspects of that language’s intended areas of application which influenced its design. The language studied will vary; students may repeat the course for different languages.

  
  • CSCI 534 - Network Systems and Design


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Systems Programming, or permission of instructor.

    The Internet; principles and design of network applications, including web servers and multimedia; transport, network and data link layers; network security; network performance evaluation and capacity planning.

  
  • CSCI 535 - Software Engineering


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Programming Languages.

    The software life cycle. Software design methodologies. Testing and maintenance. Programming teams.

  
  • CSCI 542 - Compiler Construction


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Algorithms, Computer Organization, Programming Languages.

    Principles and tools for the construction of translators for programming languages. Topics include lexical analysis, block structure, grammars, parsing, error recovery, program representation, run-time organization and code generation.

  
  • CSCI 544 - Principles of Operating Systems


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Algorithms, Computer Organization, Systems Programming.

    The conceptual view of an operating system as a collection of concurrent processes; semaphores, monitors, and rendezvous. Real and virtual memory organization, resource allocation, file organization and management, processor allocation and management, and external device management.

  
  • CSCI 554 - Computer and Network Security


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 315.

    An introduction to the principles and practices of cryptography, network security, and secure software. Cryptography topics include: basic methods, key distribution and protocols for authenticated and confidential communications. The practice of network security includes: Kerberos, PGP, public key infrastructures, SSL/TLS, IP security, intrusion detection, password management, firewalls, viruses and worms, and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks.

  
  • CSCI 566 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring variable 3-4 credits Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirments. This course may be repeated.

  
  • CSCI 597 - Problems in Computer Science


    Fall, Spring and Summer 1 Graded Pass/Fail.

    Supervised projects selected to suit the needs of the graduate student, including those wishing to perform an internship as part of the Curricular Practical Training Program. Projects to be chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor. Acceptable research outlines and project reports are required. Students may count credits received in only one offering of this course toward the number of credits required for their degree.

  
  • CSCI 608 - Decision Theory


    3 Prerequisite(s): Equivalent of MATH 351.

    Development and use of systematic procedures for assisting decision makers in evaluating alternative choices. Emphasis is on problem formulation, uncertainty and risk assessment, Bayes, minimax and other decision rules and applications. Problems will be solved using appropriate software tools.

  
  • CSCI 616 - Stochastic Models in Computer Science


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Discrete Mathematics, Calculus.

    An introduction to stochastic models, problem solving, and expected value analysis as applied to algorithms and systems in computer science. Topics include probability, discrete and continuous random variables, discrete-time Markov chains, and continuous time birth-death processes.

  
  • CSCI 618 - Models and Applications in Operations Research


    3 Prerequisite(s): Equivalent of MATH 323.

    A study of realistic and diverse Operations Research problems with emphasis upon model formulation, interpretation of results and implementation of solutions. Topics include applications of linear programming, goal programming, decomposition of largescale problems, and job scheduling algorithms. Problems will be solved using appropriate software tools.

  
  • CSCI 626 - Data Analysis and Simulation


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Some knowledge of probability and statistics.

    Basic statistical analysis techniques for experimental data generation and collection, aiming at design, analytic modeling and implementation of systems. Covers basics from the areas of statistics, simulation, event queueing, and their application to Internet systems, data centers and cloud computing, storage systems, distributed systems, and hardware/software design.

  
  • CSCI 627 - Fundamentals of Computer Graphics


    Fall or Spring 3 Pieter Peers

    Introductory and advanced computer graphics topics and applications.  This course covers both projection-based and ray-based imaged synthesis. In addition, this course will also explore advanced Monte Carlo based methods for solving the radiative transport equation, and advanced surface reflectance and subsurface reflectance models for photorealistic image synthesis.

  
  • CSCI 628 - Linear Programming


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): Equivalent of MATH 211. Corequisite(s): Equivalent of CSCI 241.

    Theory and applications of linear programming. Topics include the simplex method, duality theory, sensitivity analysis and interior point methods. Problems will be solved using appropriate software tools.

  
  • CSCI 634 - Advanced Computer Networking


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Computer Networks, or permission of the instructor.

    Covers various aspects of computer networking: Internet design principles, wireless, mobile, and sensor networks, MAC protocols, routing, congestion/flow control, network topology and traffic analysis, network security, web service, and overlay networks.

  
  • CSCI 635 - Advanced Software Engineering


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): an undergraduate course in software development.

    Covers a range of topics that challenge today’s software development teams: the design of large systems, the necessity to adjust and maintain existing software systems over a longer than expected life cycle, the urge for correctness, robustness and performance of software.

  
  • CSCI 638 - Nonlinear Programming


    3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 628  and the equivalent of MATH 212.

    Topics include unconstrained optimization, nonlinear least-squares, feasible-point methods, and penalty and barrier methods, with an emphasis on effective computational techniques.

  
  • CSCI 648 - Network Optimization


    3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 628 .

    Network flow theory and algorithms, including transportation, maximum flow shortest path and minimum spanning tree problems. Applications to a variety of areas are also stressed. Problems will be solved using appropriate software tools.

  
  • CSCI 649 - Computational Methods


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): undergraduate Calculus and Linear Algebra.

    Covers a wide spectrum of numerical algorithms and techniques for solving real world computational problems. Topics include non-linear and linear equations, interpolation, integration, differentiation, and the central effects of floating point arithmetic. Both theory and programming aspects are covered.

  
  • CSCI 652 - Advanced Compiler Construction


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Finite Automata, Compiler Construction.

    A course on compiler technology with focus on program code optimizations, generation, and parallelization. Topics include data flow analysis, code transformations, dependence theory, parallelization and vectorization, register and cache management, and interprocedural analysis.

  
  • CSCI 653 - Analysis of Algorithms


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Algorithms.

    Algorithm design techniques including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming and greedy method. Analysis methods including worst case and average case. Additional topics chosen from among amortized analysis, lower bound theory and NP-completeness.

  
  • CSCI 654 - Advanced Computer Architecture


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Computer Architecture.

    A study of high performance computer architecture with emphasis on experiments and simulation. Topics include pipelining, memory hierarchies, I/O, multiprocessors, and new designs for performance improvements.

  
  • CSCI 658 - Discrete Optimization


    Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 628  and the equivalent of CSCI 303.

    Topics include relaxation techniques, constructive heuristics, improving search techniques (simplex method simulated annealing, tabu search), branch and bound schemes, and valid inequalities for branch and cut methods. Problems will be solved using appropriate software tools.

  
  • CSCI 663 - Theory of Computation


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Finite Automata and a strong mathematical background.

    An in depth study of Turing machines and the equivalent computational models such as recursive function theory and lambda calculus. Church’s thesis and incompleteness results. Computational complexity including NP-completeness.

  
  • CSCI 664 - Advanced Operating Systems


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): Operating Systems.

    Advanced topics in the design and implementation of modern operating systems, especially those which support a distributed computer environment. Topics include: synchronization, mutual exclusion, language support, process and thread management, scheduling, remote procedure call, fault tolerance, network and parallel file systems, security, modeling and performance.

  
  • CSCI 666 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Staff Graded Pass/Fail.

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements.  Cross-listed with CSCI 766. This course may be repeated.

  
  • CSCI 668 - Reliability


    3 Prerequisite(s): equivalent of MATH 401 and CSCI 141.

    Introduction to probabilistic models and statistical method used in analysis of reliability problems. Topics include models for the lifetime of a system of components and statistical analysis of survival times data. Problems will be solved using appropriate software tools.

  
  • CSCI 678 - Statistical Analysis of Simulation Models


    3 Prerequisite(s): equivalent of MATH 351, MATH 401 and CSCI 141.

    This course introduces statistical techniques used in the analysis of simulation models. The first half of the course develops techniques for determining appropriate inputs to a simulation model, and the last half develops analysis techniques that are applied to the output of a simulation model.

  
  • CSCI 680 - Topics


    Fall and Spring 1, 2, or 3 credits, depending on the material covered Prerequisite(s): Will be published in the preregistration schedule.

    A treatment of Master’s level topics of interest not routinely covered by existing courses. Material may be chosen from various areas of computer science. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • CSCI 685 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring (0-2) Graded Pass/Fail.

    Each full-time graduate student is required to enroll in this course. No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course includes training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research, as well as discussions of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism.

     

      Cross-listed with CSCI 785. This course may be repeated.

  
  • CSCI 688 - Topics in Computational Operations Research


    3

    A treatment of Master’s level topics of interest not routinely covered by existing courses. Material may be chosen from various areas of computational operations research. May be repeated for different topics. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • CSCI 690 - Readings in Computer Science


    Fall or Spring (1, 2, or 3 credits, depending on the material covered) Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor and the Chair.

    A description of the intended contents of the readings course must be approved by the Chair before the student may register for the course. Students electing to satisfy M.S. requirements by taking 24 credits and writing a thesis may not count credits received in this course toward the required 24. Students electing to satisfy M.S. requirements by taking 32 credits may count credits received in only one offering of this course toward the required 32. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • CSCI 695 - Directed Thesis Master’s Research


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-9) Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty member. This course may be repeated, but no more than 9 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for submitting a master’s thesis.

  
  • CSCI 698 - Simulation and Modeling Project in Computational Operations Research


    Fall 3 Prerequisite(s): equivalent of MATH 401 and CSCI 241.

    Simulation model building in a high-level simulation language (SIMAN) with C++/C interface. Topics include network, discrete-event, and continuous modeling approaches. Interfaces between the three modeling approaches are presented. Familiarity with univariate and multivariate probability distributions is required for input modeling and simulation output analysis. Course culminates in a semester project in SIMAN.

  
  • CSCI 700 - Thesis


    Fall and Spring (variable 3-12) Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their master’s thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor.   Students who are not submitting a master’s thesis may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a master’s thesis.

  
  • CSCI 708 - Research Project in Computational Operations Research


    Fall and Spring 2,2 Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Graduate Director.

    Students will select a faculty advisor and committee in their area of specialization within computational operations research, prepare a research proposal abstract for approval by the department’s director of graduate studies, undertake a research project, and write a paper describing their research. This course is normally taken after a student has completed 18 credit hours toward the M.S. degree with a specialization in computational operation research. Not open to students who receive credit for either CSCI 700  or CSCI 710 .

  
  • CSCI 710 - Research Project


    Fall and Spring 2,2 Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Graduate Director.

    Students will select a faculty advisor and committee in their area of research interest, prepare a research proposal abstract for approval by the department’s director of graduate studies, undertake a research project, and write a paper describing their research. This course is normally taken after a student has completed 18 credit hours toward the M.S. degree. Not open to students who receive credit for either CSCI 700  or CSCI 708 .

  
  • CSCI 712 - Advanced Compiler Construction II


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 542 , CSCI 652 .

    A project-oriented course involving compilers or compiler generators. Possible topics include syntactic error recovery, semantic analysis, code optimization and code generation.

  
  • CSCI 723 - Advanced Analysis of Algorithms


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 653  or consent of the instructor.

    Advanced aspects of the design and analysis of computer algorithms. The study of probabilistic algorithms and parallel algorithms for solving problems from graph theory, geometry, and number theory. Lower bound theory. Intractability theory and its application to modern cryptography.

  
  • CSCI 726 - Discrete Event Simulation


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 616 , CSCI 626 .

    Methods of discrete-event simulation. Markov chains. Simulation of open and closed networks of queues. Simulation of non-stationary Poisson processes. Transient and steady-state analysis. Event list algorithms and data structures. Theoretical and empirical tests of randomness. Selected applications.

  
  • CSCI 734 - Distributed Computing Systems


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 544  or equivalent.

    Time and order in distributed systems. Synchronous and asynchronous systems. Models of faulty behavior in distributed systems. Paradigms of distributed computing: network mutual exclusion, deterministic agreement (Byzantine and fail-stop), elections, global state acquisition, atomic transactions. Issues in programming distributed systems. Reliable distributed systems. Distributed databases. Selected case studies.

  
  • CSCI 746 - Discrete-State Stochastic Models


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 616 , CSCI 626 .

    Logic, performance, and reliability analysis of discrete-state systems. Exploration of the state space. Queuing networks, fault trees, reliability block diagrams, task graphs, Petri nets and domain-oriented languages. Underlying stochastic processes, solutions and approximations.

  
  • CSCI 749 - Numerical Algorithms


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 649 , or permission of the instructor.

    In-depth study of modern numerical algorithms central to solving many scientific and engineering problems, and of the techniques used to develop and analyze those algorithms, with an emphasis on algorithmic issues.

  
  • CSCI 754 - Performance Evaluation of Computer Systems


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 526 , CSCI 626 , or permission of the instructor.

    Analytical modeling techniques and their application in computer system performance modeling and prediction. Modeling of resource allocation policies in parallel systems, web server analysis, measurements and workload characterization of parallel computations and multimedia applications, hardware/software design, and bottleneck analysis.

  
  • CSCI 766 - Directed Studies


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Staff Graded Pass/Fail

    No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required to satisfy graduate degree requirements.  Cross-listed with CSCI 666

  
  • CSCI 774 - Parallel Computing


    Fall or Spring 3 Prerequisite(s): CSCI 652 , CSCI 653 , or permission of the instructor.

    This course introduces parallel computation as a means of achieving high performance in modern parallel architectures. A unified approach is followed, where the design of parallel algorithms, their implementation and performance evaluation is studied in relation to the underlying system.

  
  • CSCI 780 - Advanced Topics


    Fall or Spring (1, 2, or 3 credits, depending on material) Prerequisite(s): Will be published in the preregistration schedule.

    A treatment of doctoral-level topics of interest not routinely covered by existing courses. Material may be chosen from various areas of computer science. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • CSCI 785 - Colloquium


    Fall and Spring (1) Graded Pass/Fail.

    Each full-time graduate student is required to enroll in this course. No credits earned in this course may be applied to the number of credits required for a degree. This course includes training in the responsible and ethical conduct of research, as well as discussions of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. Cross-listed with CSCI 685. This course may be repeated.

  
  • CSCI 790 - Readings in Computer Science


    Fall or Spring (1, 2, or 3 credits, depending on the material covered) Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor and the Graduate Director.

    A description of the intended contents of the readings course must be approved by the Graduate Director before the student may register for the course. Students electing to satisfy M.S. requirements by taking 24 credits and writing a thesis may not count credits received in this course toward the required 24. Students electing to satisfy M.S. requirements by taking 32 credits may count credits received in only one offering of this course toward the required 32. This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  • CSCI 795 - Directed Dissertation Research


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail. Note: Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements.

    Students design and conduct research in support of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.  This course may be repeated, but no more than 12 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.

  
  • CSCI 800 - Dissertation


    Fall and Spring (3-12) Staff. Graded Pass/Fail.

    Students finish the research for and the writing of their dissertation under the direction of a faculty advisor.   Students who are not submitting a dissertation may not use this course to satisfy degree requirements. This course may be repeated, but no more than 6 semester credit hours may be used to satisfy degree requirements for a student submitting a dissertation.


Curriculum & Instruction

  
  • CRIN E03 - Elementary Reading and Language Arts Curriculum and Instruction


    (5). Corequisite(s): CRIN E04, CRIN L03 , and L04

    A course on the fundamentals of developmental and diagnostic reading instruction in elementary and middle schools. Included is study of the school reading program from emergent literacy to reading in content areas. Classroom diagnostic techniques and corrective methods are an integral part of the course.

  
  • CRIN E05 - Elementary Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction


    (2). Corequisite(s): CRIN L05  

    An exploration of the objectives, curricula, instruc­tional strategies, and evaluation of social studies education at the elementary school level. Included are experiences in the design of instructional materials for use in the classroom.

  
  • CRIN E06 - Elementary Science Curriculum and Instruction


    (2). Corequisite(s): CRIN L06 , CRIN E07 , CRIN E11 , and CRIN L20  

    A course in which students examine the goals, objec­tives, instructional strategies, student and teacher behaviors, philosophies, strengths, shortcomings of exemplary elementary school science curricula as a basis for designing science instruction.

  
  • CRIN E07 - Elementary Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction


    (2). Corequisite(s): CRIN L07  

    A lecture/laboratory course that assists the beginning teacher to become familiar with the elementary and middle school mathematics curriculum and with various manipulatives, models, materials, technology, and instructional methods appropriate for teaching this curriculum and to develop the ability to plan and execute instruction designed to teach skills, understanding, and problem solving at the elementary and middle school levels.

  
  • CRIN E08 - Introduction to Classroom Organization, Management and Discipline


    (1). Prerequisite(s): CRIN F11, F12, and F65

    A course designed to help prospective teachers promote positive student behavior. Emphasis is placed on the selection of strategies, procedures, and possible actions that enhance classroom organization and management and reduce and/or prevent misbehavior.

  
  • CRIN E09 - Designs for Technology-Enhanced Learning (Elementary Education)


    (2). Prerequisite(s): Admission to the elementary education teacher certification program.

    An introduction to computer-based instructional technologies, Internet resources, other emerging technologies, and instructional design. Students will acquire technical skills in selected software applications and integrate emerging technologies into the curriculum.

  
  • CRIN E10 - Adaptations for Exceptional Student Populations (Elementary Education)


    (1). Prerequisite(s): Open only to elementary education concentrators.

    A course designed for students concentrating in elementary education to enable them to develop and implement specific strategies for teaching exceptional children (e.g., students with disabilities, at-risk, gifted, culturally diverse) in general education classrooms.

  
  • CRIN E11 - Student Teaching Seminar in Elementary Education


    (1). Graded Pass/Fail. Corequisite(s): Courses in the third semester of Elementary Education Program.

    A seminar designed to provide students with an op­portunity to reflect on their classroom experiences and to refine their applications of their knowledge, decision-making, and skills in coordinating instruction, classroom organization, management, and discipline.

  
  • CRIN E22 - Characteristics of Exceptional Student Populations (Elementary)


    (1).

    This course, designed for graduate students concentrating in Elementary Education, provides an introduction to varying exceptionalities and characteristics of exceptional elementary age children (e.g., students who have disabilities, are at risk, are gifted/talented, come from culturally & linguistically diverse backgrounds) and provides an overview of applicable educational policies and services.

  
  • CRIN G60 - Master’s Thesis in Gifted and Talented Education


    (Var.) Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

  
  • CRIN G80 - Psychology and Education of the Gifted Learner


    (3).

    This course focuses on the nature of gifted learners and how they differ in cognitive, affective, develop­mental, and behavioral ways from more typical learn­ers. It will emphasize general theories of intelligence, development, and learning and how they apply to gifted learners.

  
  • CRIN G82 - Social and Emotional Development and Guidance of the Gifted Learner


    (3). Prerequisite(s): CRIN G80  or equivalent.

    This course focuses on the social and emotional characteristics and needs of the gifted individual and various counseling and guidance strategies that can facilitate his/her development over the life span. The course will emphasize theories of emotional develop­ment and self-actualization and their implications for guiding the gifted.

  
  • CRIN G84 - Practicum in Gifted Education


    (3). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): CRIN G80  & EPPL 612  

    This practicum is designed to provide direct experi­ences with gifted education programs and services. Both seminar and field experiences focus on com­prehensive articulated programs and services for this population.

  
  • CRIN G86 - Addressing the Individual Needs and Talents in the Regular Classroom


    (3).

    This course will outline instructional and managerial techniques that can be used in the heterogeneous classroom to address the individual learning needs, strengths, styles, and preferences of all students, but specifically, those with gifts and talents. This course will also teach students the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL).

  
  • CRIN L03 - Elementary Reading and Language Arts Curriculum and Instruction


    (1). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): CRIN E05  / CRIN L05 , CRIN E06  / CRIN L06 , CRIN E07  / CRIN L07   Corequisite(s): CRIN E03  

    A course designed to provide opportunities for students to observe and participate in developmental/diagnostic reading instruction in an elementary school classroom.

  
  • CRIN L05 - Elementary Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction (Practicum)


    (1). Graded Pass/Fail. Corequisite(s): CRIN E05  

    A course designed to provide the prospective el­ementary school teacher with the opportunities to experience and reflect on practices of social studies education in the school setting.

  
  • CRIN L06 - Elementary Science Curriculum and Instruction (Practicum)


    (1). Graded Pass/Fail. Corequisite(s): CRIN E06  

    A course designed to provide students with a first opportunity to reflectively apply/refine their skills/knowledge about the teaching of science as both a process and a product, as a way of knowing and as a body of knowledge.

  
  • CRIN L07 - Elementary Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction (Practicum)


    (1). Graded Pass/Fail. Corequisite(s): CRIN E07  

    A course designed to provide students with an op­portunity to apply, refine, and modify their preliminary beliefs about teaching mathematics.

  
  • CRIN L10 - Differentiating and Managing in Diverse Classrooms Practicum: Elementary


    (1).

    A course designed to provide the prospective elementary school teacher with the opportunities to experience and reflect. This course is a clinical practicum designed to acquaint students with the school personnel, policies, and instructional/behavioral practices of inclusive classrooms at the elementary level. The practicum provides students with a view to how different theoretical perspectives manifest in actual schools and classroom settings.

  
  • CRIN L20 - Supervised Teaching in Elementary Education


    (7) Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): First- and second-semester courses in elementary education program. Corequisite(s): Third-semester courses in elementary education program.

    A field-based experience designed to enable pre-service elementary teachers to become competent at the entry level in the roles, functions, and skills of classroom teachers.

  
  • CRIN L29 - Internship in Supervised Teaching (Social Studies)


    (7). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Corequisite(s):   , CRIN S09 , CRIN S42 , and CRIN S47  

     

    A field-based experience designed to enable pre-service secondary teachers to become competent at the entry level in the roles, functions, and skills of classroom teachers.

  
  • CRIN L30 - Internship in Supervised Teaching (English)


    (7). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Corequisite(s):  

     , CRIN S09 , CRIN S38 , and CRIN S43  

    A field-based experience designed to enable pre-service secondary teachers to become competent at the entry level in the roles, functions, and skills of classroom teachers.

  
  • CRIN L31 - Internship in Supervised Teaching (Modern Foreign Languages)


    (7). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Corequisite(s):  

     , CRIN S09 , CRIN S40 , and CRIN S45  

    A field-based experience designed to enable graduate pre-service K-12 teachers to become competent at the entry level in the roles, functions, and skills of classroom teachers.

  
  • CRIN L32 - Internship in Supervised Teaching (Mathematics)


    (7). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Corequisite(s):  

     , CRIN S09 , CRIN S39 , and CRIN S44  

    A field-based experience designed to enable graduate pre-service secondary teachers to become competent at the entry level in the roles, functions, and skills of classroom teachers.

  
  • CRIN L33 - Internship in Supervised Teaching (Science)


    (7). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Corequisite(s):  

     , CRIN S09 , CRIN S41 , and CRIN S46  

    A field-based experience designed to enable graduate pre-service secondary teachers to become compe­tent at the entry level in the roles, functions, and skills of classroom teachers.

  
  • CRIN M01 - Current Trends and Issues in Mathematics Education: Leadership I for Mathematics Specialists


    (3).

    This course will provide an introduction to the role of the mathematics specialist and a survey of current issues and trends in mathematics education. Focus will be on learning theory, assessment, and issues of diverse learners; self-reflection and collaboration; and instruction, especially the design, teaching, and evaluation of inquiry based lessons.

  
  • CRIN M02 - Development and Evaluation of Educational Staff: Leadership II for Mathematics Specialists


    (3).

    This course will provide continued study of the role of the mathematics specialist and a survey of current issues and trends in mathematics education. Focus will be on developing and refining coaching skills and skills to work with adult learners, building a deeper understanding of mathematics content pedagogy, and becoming familiar with the body of research related to selected topics within the NCTM strands in mathematics education.

  
  • CRIN M03 - Advanced Curriculum Theory in Mathematics: Leadership III for Mathematics Specialists


    (3).

    This course will provide continued study of the role of the mathematics specialist and a survey of current issues and trends in mathematics education. Focus will be on developing and refining knowledge and skills used to identify problems in teaching or learn­ing mathematics, to identify and use resources to address those problems, and to evaluate the results of an intervention. Participants will also develop and refine their knowledge and skills in grant writing and formal presentations.

  
  • CRIN M04 - Internship in Mathematics Leadership


    (3). Graded Pass/Fail.

    An internship is required of all master’s students in the K-8 Mathematics Specialist Program. Individual arrangements are made by the student, internship supervisor, and faculty.

  
  • CRIN R07 - Language Development and English Language Learners


    (3).

    This course focuses on language development, stages of language acquisition, methods of evaluating language performance, and strategies for improving the quality and quantity of oral language for first and second language learners. The influence of dialect and exceptionalities and the impact of oral language on early literacy development are addressed.

  
  • CRIN R08 - Literacy Instruction for Diverse Learners


    (3).

    A course designed to help teachers understand the foundations of children’s literacy development. Fo­cus is placed on the research-based best practices that promote student achievement in the teaching of reading and language arts to diverse groups of learners. Attention is given to the cultural context of literacy development.

  
  • CRIN R11 - Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum


    (3).

    A course intended for K-12 teachers who desire to improve their knowledge and skill in effectively integrating content reading into any subject area. Reading assessment and instructional strategies for content reading will be explored as well as instructional strategies for student who have reading difficulties in content areas.

  
  • CRIN R13 - The Teaching of Writing


    (3) Prereq/Corequisite(s):
     

    This course is designed to help teachers learn current practices and theories of teaching. All aspects of the writ­ing process will be explored as well as the role of grammar and spelling instruction within the context of student writing. Intervention strategies for writing will be demonstrated and implemented by teachers in the class.

  
  • CRIN R15 - Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties Practicum (K-6 Grades)


    (3). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s):  CRIN R07  and CRIN R08  

    This course is designed to help students identify potential and actual reading difficulties and to develop and implement effective reading instruction for K-6 grade students experiencing reading difficulties. It focuses on diagnostic techniques, interpretation of information gathered, and instructional strategies for these students.

  
  • CRIN R17 - Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties Practicum (6-12 Grades)


    (3). Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite(s): CRIN R07  and CRIN R08  

    This course is designed to help students identify potential and actual reading difficulties and to develop and implement effective reading instruction for 6-12 grade students experiencing reading difficulties. It focuses on diagnostic techniques, interpretation of information gathered, and instructional strategies for these students.

  
  • CRIN R21 - Diverse Literature for Children


    (3)

    This course provides a thorough look at the field of children’s literature to include the value and usage of diverse children’s literature across genres, criteria for evaluation and selecting books for all children, methods of extending children’s literature through creative activities, and the discussion of current issues in the field of children’s literature.

  
  • CRIN R22 - Word Knowledge: Phonics, Spelling and Vocabulary


    (3).

    This course examines the theoretical and practical context for word knowledge instruction for K-12 classrooms. This includes the developmental stages of word knowledge, methods of evaluating word knowledge and instructional strategies supporting children’s understanding of phonics, spelling, and vocabulary development.

 

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